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Old April 26th, 2009 #1
wildbill
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Default A Favor to Ask of Slavic Language Speakers

I hope somebody here can help me out. My wife's grandmother came from Eastern Europe, somewhere in or near Russia, we think. Possibly the Carpathian mountain area, but nobody is sure. My father-in-law remembers the old folks often talking about a group of people back in Europe they referred to as "the mumirushaks". I'm spelling that phonetically, so the spelling is certainly incorrect. Anyone have a guess as to what this word means?

Thanks for the help.
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Old April 26th, 2009 #2
Mark Kerpolt
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My guess is Marmatian Rutheneans? In the Romanian region of Maramureş with a sizable Ruthenean, or Russyn, minority.

Rutheneans are interesting. The majority of them appear to make up a huge part of nowadays' Ukrainians, though a lot also prefer to consider themselves Russian instead. From what I understand — as their name more or less suggests — they're actually core descendants of Kievan Ruś.
 
Old April 26th, 2009 #3
wildbill
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Originally Posted by Euvipro View Post
My guess is Marmatian Rutheneans? In the Romanian region of Maramureş with a sizable Ruthenean, or Russyn, minority.
After I posted that, I started thinking "mumirushak" might be a name of some family back in the old country. My wife's grandmother's maiden name was Fedelishak.
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Old April 27th, 2009 #4
Stegura
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Originally Posted by wildbill View Post
My wife's grandmother's maiden name was Fedelishak.
Your Grandmother's name sounds Ukrainian. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries alot of Ukrainian, Ruthenian, and Slovakians immigrated into Western Pennsylvania for jobs in the Steel Mills.

My paternal Great-Grandparents were Carpatho-Rusyns from Uzhorod, Ukraine (back then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire). They came to Pittsburgh for work in the Steel Mills. Today, many colorful beautiful Byzantine Catholic churches dot countryside of Southwestern Pennslyvania, the legacy of Ruthenian immigrants to the region.

Think of the film "Deer Hunter".



Wonderful movie about the children of Ruthenian immigrants and their ethnic upbringing in the western Pennslyvania steel mill industry. I especially liked the opening church wedding scenes.

 
Old April 27th, 2009 #5
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Originally Posted by Euvipro View Post
Rutheneans are interesting.
Yes they are. My paternal Grandparents were Carpatho-Rusyns or Ruthenians as they liked to be called.



The Rusyn language is divided as follows: (From wikipedia)

* Hutsul is spoken in the montaineous part of Suceava County and Maramures County in Romania and the extreme southern parts of the Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast (as well as in parts of the Chernivtsi and Transcarpathian Oblasts, and on the northern slopes of the Carpathian Mountains.

* Boyko is spoken on the northern side of the Carpathian Mountains in the Lviv and Ivano-Frankivsk Oblasts. It can also be heard across the border in the Subcarpathian Voivodship of Poland

* Lemko is spoken outside Ukraine in the Prešov Region of Slovakia along the southern side of the Carpathian Mountains.

* Dolinian Rusyn or Subcarpathian Rusyn is spoken in the Transcarpathian Oblast.

* Pryashiv Rusyn is the Rusyn spoken in the Prešov (in Ukrainian: Pryashiv) region of Slovakia, as well as by some émigré communities, primarily in the United States of America.

* Bačka Rusyn is spoken in northwestern Serbia and eastern Croatia. Rusin language of the Bačka dialect is one of the official languages of the Serbian Autonomous Province of Vojvodina)

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though a lot also prefer to consider themselves Russian instead.
That's a real shame.

I used to call my Rusyn Grandparent's "Russian" but they took offense to it. They later took the time to tell me that they have never considered themselves to be Russians and that Ruthenians had their own unique culture, history, and ethnic identity.

Ruthenia's culture and history is much more closely tied to Central Europe, Catholicism, and the Hapsburg monarchy then it is to Eastern Europe, Orthodoxy, and the Russian Federation.

Historically, Ruthenia belonged to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, then the Czechoslovaks, and then briefly to the Hungarians. Tragically, the eastern half of Ruthenia fell into the Russo-Soviet sphere of influence after WW2.
 
Old April 27th, 2009 #6
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Bačka Rusyn is spoken in northwestern Serbia and eastern Croatia. Rusin language of the Bačka dialect is one of the official languages of the Serbian Autonomous Province of Vojvodina)
A good friend of mine is half Rusyn from his mother's side.

There are about 15,000 of them in Vojvodina.


Rusyn Church in Ruski Krstur
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Old April 27th, 2009 #7
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Originally Posted by Stegura View Post
Your Grandmother's name sounds Ukrainian. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries alot of Ukrainian, Ruthenian, and Slovakians immigrated into Western Pennsylvania for jobs in the Steel Mills.
Thanks for that info. I think you are right. We live in the Pittsburgh area. My wife's grandmother went to a Byzantine Catholic church. I recall my wife's Mom wasn't too keen on that because her side of the family were all Roman Catholics.

My father-in-law said that back during the Cold War many people from Russia or Ukraine didn't want to be suspected of being unpatriotic or a spy so they would often give vague descriptions of their nationality. He said that's why if asked his mother would say her family were from the Carpathian mountain area instead of naming an actual country. Most people here in the America would not know where that was unless they looked at a map. This is probably the main source of the confusion.
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Old April 27th, 2009 #8
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Originally Posted by Stegura View Post



That's a real shame.

I used to call my Rusyn Grandparent's "Russian" but they took offense to it. They later took the time to tell me that they have never considered themselves to be Russians and that Ruthenians had their own unique culture, history, and ethnic identity.
I disagree, I am part Western/Ukranian myself but I recognize that the Russian ethnicity is the most superior in that part of Europe. (Serbia being the most superior ethnicity in SE Europe) Consider that for example the greatest Ukrainian called the Ukrainian language dirty Russian and is to this day considered a Russian noble. It's nice to have some minor identity but when it comes to ethnicity being Russian is better than any other baby ethnicity which always feels threatened and insignificant.

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Ruthenia's culture and history is much more closely tied to Central Europe, Catholicism, and the Hapsburg monarchy then it is to Eastern Europe, Orthodoxy, and the Russian Federation.
And you feel proud of being a Catholic? One of the most militant, greedy and blood thirsty religions on Earth? Disgusting.

The truth is Ruthenia's roots is common with all of Russia's, the same Rus' people, the same Kievan Rus' , that you want to divide essentially the same people by RELIGION shows that you have a low character.
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Historically, Ruthenia belonged to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, then the Czechoslovaks, and then briefly to the Hungarians. Tragically, the eastern half of Ruthenia fell into the Russo-Soviet sphere of influence after WW2.
Uh for recent History Ruthenia has been Russian that is why many consider themselves Russian which as I said is a superior ethnicity.

As I said before Ruthenia IS historically Rus' just like Russians. That you consider yourself closer to the West just by religion just shows you're a globalist. I am very happy to know, though, that most Ruthenians don't fall for the religious scam

Last edited by psychologicalshock; April 27th, 2009 at 10:53 AM.
 
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