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Old May 25th, 2019 #1
ColdFire
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Default Hip Hop music least popular in Ireland , study says


. . can 't share a link because this story recently was on German t.v.

There were interviews with urban kids conducted from all across Europe, including Ireland.


Apparently the Irish aren't that into Hip Hop.

- - -

Now . . those of you who read my posts may know that I take quite a mild position on Hip Hop ( the music as such , NOT the groids doing it . .) but . .

. . many people , until today , associate Hip Hop with 'black ghetto culture'.

You know, "doin' 'G's' , sellin' crack . . ." etc.

Apparently not so in Ireland . .

- - - -

The Irish , for European standards, are said to be a very traditional county, still . . .

Some malevolently even call that 'rustical'.

A lot of rural land, lot of tradition , "pub-culture".

- - - -

Anyway , out of all European countries , Ireland seems to be the place where Hip Hop falls on deafest ears.
- - - -

Hmmm . .

I wonder what 'Everlast' would say to that . . .
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Pain


 
Old May 26th, 2019 #2
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Peter Casey, running for EU parliament isn't afraid to refer to himself as racist:

https://www.reddit.com/r/ireland/com...ople_say_im_a/

"People say you're a racist, of course I'm a racist. I'm a very proud Irishman."
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Old May 26th, 2019 #3
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Originally Posted by Breanna View Post
Peter Casey, running for EU parliament isn't afraid to refer to himself as racist:

https://www.reddit.com/r/ireland/com...ople_say_im_a/

"People say you're a racist, of course I'm a racist. I'm a very proud Irishman."

. . I smell a "termination" comin'.










. . .
 
Old June 23rd, 2019 #5
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Boo-hoo-hoo-hoo ! !

. . . you are a female after my own heart ,sister

I also am a sucker for Irish Folk . . .


Now , I do take quite a mild position on Hip Hop ( read my other threads on that subject) but Irish music is great







Last edited by ColdFire; June 23rd, 2019 at 08:27 AM.
 
Old June 23rd, 2019 #6
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There is something unique about Irish people voices.
 
Old June 24th, 2019 #7
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Originally Posted by ColdFire View Post
Boo-hoo-hoo-hoo ! !

. . . you are a female after my own heart ,sister

I also am a sucker for Irish Folk . . .


Now , I do take quite a mild position on Hip Hop ( read my other threads on that subject) but Irish music is great

Dubliners The wild Rover



The Wild Rover (No, Nay, Never) - Lyrics ,

Irish Drinking Songs- The Blarney Lads - Muirsheen Durkin

I'll Tell Me Ma - The Blarney Lads
Ah, the Irish. A lyrical people.

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Old June 26th, 2019 #8
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There is something unique about Irish people voices.
The Irish ,if you ask me, often have that whiskey-celebration flavour in their voices . .

I do not mean that in a negative way, i. e. that they're all drunk-asses but that they are a very customs-conscious people

And . . I know I've said it on this forum many times . .the Irish pronounciation was more or less the precursor of American English in contrast to for example the English spoken in England . . The U.S. did start out as an English colony but since the beginning of the 1800s more and more Irish settled there even to the point that the original 'British English' spoken there took on an Irish pronounciation. .

British English . .


Irish pronounciation . .

 
Old July 4th, 2019 #10
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Old July 4th, 2019 #11
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Cool

 
Old July 6th, 2019 #12
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Old July 10th, 2019 #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdFire View Post
The Irish ,if you ask me, often have that whiskey-celebration flavour in their voices . .

I do not mean that in a negative way, i. e. that they're all drunk-asses but that they are a very customs-conscious people

And . . I know I've said it on this forum many times . .the Irish pronounciation was more or less the precursor of American English in contrast to for example the English spoken in England . . The U.S. did start out as an English colony but since the beginning of the 1800s more and more Irish settled there even to the point that the original 'British English' spoken there took on an Irish pronounciation. .
I find this notion somewhat strange as American English sounds so different from either a British or Irish accent I thought its more a blend of a bunch of different European voices like French and maybe Polish and German and stuff like that in there too? Saying "my" instead of "me" where does that come from as in "me hand" what Irish and English people say rather than "my hand" what Americans say? I'm from an island settled entirely by people from Bristol in England and Devon and southern Ireland and peoples accents are extremely different from the accents on mainland North America such that it becomes immediately obvious that I am a foreigner and every American/Canadian I'm ever after meeting thinks I'm from the UK.
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Old July 10th, 2019 #14
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Originally Posted by Breanna View Post
I find this notion somewhat strange as American English sounds so different from either a British or Irish accent I thought its more a blend of a bunch of different European voices like French and maybe Polish and German and stuff like that in there too? Saying "my" instead of "me" where does that come from as in "me hand" what Irish and English people say rather than "my hand" what Americans say? I'm from an island settled entirely by people from Bristol in England and Devon and southern Ireland and peoples accents are extremely different from the accents on mainland North America such that it becomes immediately obvious that I am a foreigner and every American/Canadian I'm ever after meeting thinks I'm from the UK.
Sister , it is a fact that from about 1800 on more and more Irish settled in North America.

I think at the core Irish pronounciation for English was the root of 'American English' . .

For example , a person from England for the word 'car park' would pronounce 'cuh puk' while and American would emphasize the r's , 'carr parrk' . . . Or he wouldn't say 'city' , emphasizing the 't' , but would pronounce it 'ciddy' . . . you know what I mean.

The basics for American English I think was the pronounciation of Ireland.


The Irish influence into American culture can be seen by 'Wild West' phenomena such as banjo playing , drinking whiskey , dancing reel et al . .

The U.S. did start out as an English colony , so the Founding Fathers a la Washington , Jefferson et al must still have spoken British but from 1800 on more and more Irish moved there . . This was also the high phase of the American 'Wild West' from about 1800 to 1900 which was comprised like I said of banjo playing , whiskey drinking folks.

You have an interesting theory as well but for me it is out of question that the U.S.A. was heavily influenced by Ireland.
 
Old July 10th, 2019 #15
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Originally Posted by ColdFire View Post
Sister , it is a fact that from about 1800 on more and more Irish settled in North America.

I think at the core Irish pronounciation for English was the root of 'American English' . .

For example , a person from England for the word 'car park' would pronounce 'cuh puk' while and American would emphasize the r's , 'carr parrk' . . . Or he wouldn't say 'city' , emphasizing the 't' , but would pronounce it 'ciddy' . . . you know what I mean.

The basics for American English I think was the pronounciation of Ireland.


The Irish influence into American culture can be seen by 'Wild West' phenomena such as banjo playing , drinking whiskey , dancing reel et al . .

The U.S. did start out as an English colony , so the Founding Fathers a la Washington , Jefferson et al must still have spoken British but from 1800 on more and more Irish moved there . . This was also the high phase of the American 'Wild West' from about 1800 to 1900 which was comprised like I said of banjo playing , whiskey drinking folks.

You have an interesting theory as well but for me it is out of question that the U.S.A. was heavily influenced by Ireland.
I don't contest that the USA has an Irish influence but to me it does not seem like it was the main influence. The accent and the culture is very different and I say so because I live in a place that has an accent/culture that is a direct blend of English and Irish and the dialect is so different from the standard American accent. Some words have the exact opposite pronunciation for example the words tie and toy. Here, tie is pronounced like "toy" and toy is pronounced like "tie" which is the same as how it is in Ireland, the exact opposite of America. Likewise boil is pronounced like "bile," boy like "bye" and words like right are pronounced like "roight" and life as "loife" which is how it is in Ireland and in England. If I could point to a more well-known accent that is a direct blend of England and Ireland it would probably be in Australia which is also very different from the USA. There's also the regional differences between the North and the South in the USA with the accents what does that come from? Surely it must come from a different ethnic origin of the two regions?

Interesting with what you say about the r's and the t's in some words here the t is pronounced very hard, much harder than in America but in some words the t is not pronounced at all. A double t in the middle of a word won't be said at all for example the word kettle will be said "keh-ul" or battle "bah-ul" or little "lih-ul." But in other words the t will be pronounced very exaggerated in a word such as shout, water, wait, which to me sound like "shoud," "wadder," "waid" when an American says it.

The rs here sound much more exaggerated than the American rs too in words like car, heart, and so on. Then we have h's pronounced here in words a lot for example in "white" you will hear the h but even in words that don't have an h for example water sounds more like "what-her" and red like "rhed." All that comes from Ireland if I'm not mistaken but those are things I really don't hear in an American accent.

The stereotypical American to me and Americans I met lack the stereotypical Irish personality of being very merry and jovial, they're more stereotypically impatient, always in a rush, and not as happy or polite.
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Old July 10th, 2019 #16
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I don't contest that the USA has an Irish influence but to me it does not seem like it was the main influence. The accent and the culture is very different and I say so because I live in a place that has an accent/culture that is a direct blend of English and Irish and the dialect is so different from the standard American accent. Some words have the exact opposite pronunciation for example the words tie and toy. Here, tie is pronounced like "toy" and toy is pronounced like "tie" which is the same as how it is in Ireland, the exact opposite of America. Likewise boil is pronounced like "bile," boy like "bye" and words like right are pronounced like "roight" and life as "loife" which is how it is in Ireland and in England. If I could point to a more well-known accent that is a direct blend of England and Ireland it would probably be in Australia which is also very different from the USA. There's also the regional differences between the North and the South in the USA with the accents what does that come from? Surely it must come from a different ethnic origin of the two regions?

Interesting with what you say about the r's and the t's in some words here the t is pronounced very hard, much harder than in America but in some words the t is not pronounced at all. A double t in the middle of a word won't be said at all for example the word kettle will be said "keh-ul" or battle "bah-ul" or little "lih-ul." But in other words the t will be pronounced very exaggerated in a word such as shout, water, wait, which to me sound like "shoud," "wadder," "waid" when an American says it.

The rs here sound much more exaggerated than the American rs too in words like car, heart, and so on. Then we have h's pronounced here in words a lot for example in "white" you will hear the h but even in words that don't have an h for example water sounds more like "what-her" and red like "rhed." All that comes from Ireland if I'm not mistaken but those are things I really don't hear in an American accent.

The stereotypical American to me and Americans I met lack the stereotypical Irish personality of being very merry and jovial, they're more stereotypically impatient, always in a rush, and not as happy or polite.
Sis , concerning your scepticism about American English having been influenced by Ireland . .

Largely two things separate British and American ( in the long run ) . .

That the Americans much more emphasize the 'r' ( like I said , "car park" - - > British "cuh puk" ; American 'carr parrk' ) and that t's are often made d's ( 'city' - - -> 'ciddy' ; 'sexuality' - - > 'sexualeddy' . .) . .

Listen to many Irish people speaking , that accent in the long run originates in Ireland . .


Concerning the rest of what you wrote . .

Yes , the USA has different dialect zones.

I once heard that for example the Boston area still has an accent which sounds a lot like British , that New York has its own accent and , most of all , that people in the American south have a characteristic accent.

Well .. Boston is in the New England states , New York has seen lots of European ethnicities and , concerning the south . .

I once heard that the American South was heavily influenced by Scotland ( most people there seem to have had that ancestry ) even to the point that many claim the American Southern dialect was influenced by Scottish.

I have never been to the U.S. (even though I plan to . .) yet these are interesting facts.
 
Old July 26th, 2019 #17
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The part of the USA I live in is very Irish-influenced
 
Old 3 Weeks Ago #18
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The part of the USA I live in is very Irish-influenced
. .

You yourself are German-American , I take it . .?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dillenburg

 
Old 2 Weeks Ago #19
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More media obsession from the fantasist cattle?

Btw this is Ireland's current top 40

https://www.officialcharts.com/chart...singles-chart/

Just to demonstrate you're talking out of your rectal cavity as usual
 
Old 2 Weeks Ago #20
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sure, irish had a lot of influence on America
 
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