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Old October 11th, 2012 #1
Alex Linder
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Interesting story about the company that makes all those cheap knockoffs you see on the Sci Fi channel. They churn out dozens of movies for under $1m apiece, and they make good money. Imagine a WN factory duplicating their model on a smaller scale. Why not? The graphic effects they use are shitty, but it doesn't matter. Why couldn't a few enterprising WN turn out stereotype-reversed knockoffs of Hollywood products at 10k a pop?

http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/...ery-box-office
 
Old October 11th, 2012 #2
Steven L. Akins
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My thought would be to produce a "fantasy" type storyline, but one that is actually entirely based upon actual history told from our point of view, begining around the time that Christianity was first introduced into Europe and showing the growing problem of Jewish infiltration into White European culture and politics.

I had this idea running through my head the other night as I was lying in bed, and got up to jot down a few things:

Quote:
It first began long ago, at the very dawning of the Second Age, when our people ruled all of Arocharia, and the tribes still worshiped their own gods.

The Zemians came into our lands, having been conquered by the Latians, who ruled over the province of Romalia in southern Arocharia.

They were few at first, but later there would be many. They came as traders and merchants from their own country of Zemia, which lay to the east, travelling through our towns and villages, plying their wares; or as actors and entertainers, performing plays and music.

They were a small people, somewhat darker than us. Not warriors like ourselves, but weak and spider-like, with close-set eyes that strained to see the fine markings on the coins that they were paid with; always keeping a close eye on every penny that passed through their fingers, tucking them carefully away into their purses and money-boxes.
It would be actual history presented as a fantasy epic, with the names of the races and countries changed but clearly identifiable as to their intended representation.

By not being too upfront and obvious about it, you would more easily capture the attention of the average viewer (who isn't terribly bright to begin with) but still be able to impart our point of view regarding the history of our race and our struggle with our opponents.

It's just a pity that we don't have Peter Jackson on our side.
 
Old August 29th, 2013 #3
Karl Lueger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
Interesting story about the company that makes all those cheap knockoffs you see on the Sci Fi channel. They churn out dozens of movies for under $1m apiece, and they make good money. Imagine a WN factory duplicating their model on a smaller scale. Why not? The graphic effects they use are shitty, but it doesn't matter. Why couldn't a few enterprising WN turn out stereotype-reversed knockoffs of Hollywood products at 10k a pop?
I know a few white people who are still in California
[yup.. struggling actors and musician types]
and they are trying to get their own production companies started,
as a means of creating career opportunities not available trghough the usual grind of auditions/begging, or other ways...

sadly none of them are nationalistic, at best call them "christling conservatives"
trying to compete against the corrupt morals of the movie biz as they see them without any condemnation of jews..
so itz a losing game so far..
__________________
"To survive a war, you gotta become war."

Rambo, John J.
 
Old January 22nd, 2014 #4
Alex Linder
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actors who got screwed or tricked by directors

http://www.cracked.com/article_20791...ent-movie.html
 
Old February 2nd, 2014 #5
Alex Linder
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Infographic shows the most common problems in screenplays

Last year, a scriptreader read 300 scripts for 5 studios, all the while taking notes on the problems and trends he saw. The number 1 problem? The story started too late in the script.

The scriptreader listed 37 frequently occurring problems, here are the top 20:

The story begins too late in the script
The scenes are void of meaningful conflict
The script has a by-the-numbers execution
The story is too thin
The villains are cartoonish, evil-for-the-sake-of-evil
The character logic is muddy
The female part is underwritten
The narrative falls into a repetitive pattern
The conflict is inconsequential, flash-in-the-pan
The protagonist is a standard issue hero
The script favors style over substance
The ending is completely anti-climactic
The characters are all stereotypes
The script suffers from arbitrary complexity
The script goes off the rails in the third act
The script's questions are left unanswered
The story is a string of unrelated vignettes
The plot unravels through convenience/contrivance
The script is tonally confused
The protagonist is not as strong as [he or she needs to] be

http://io9.com/infographic-shows-the...myspiritguide1
 
Old May 8th, 2014 #6
Alex Linder
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10 Filmmaking Heavyweights Predict the Future of Cinema
By Emerson Rosenthal — May 5 2014

It seems like long ago that Francis Ford Coppola was waxing poetic on the Warholian notions of what the filmmaking landscape might look like in the prosumer era. This was in 1991, a year before I was born, of course, into a budding world of DIY-CGI DSLR filmmaking, but the idea that there were once prohibitive barriers to both saying what you want to say, cinematically, and finding an audience, sounds as silly as the title of this Onion article, "James Cameron Says Future Of Movies Will Be Watching Them Sitting On His Lap."

"It's really a space that you can hardly guess where those stories and where those experiences are gonna take us," World Media Lab director Alex McDowell says about the future of cinema, in our documentary Leviathan: The Future Of Storytelling. "We're really moving rapidly into a new narrative space."

Filmmakers are often the bellwethers of the zeitgeist, but that noble position often comes with a desire to make sweeping predictions about what the future of filmmaking will be. In many cases, including, in the case of critic Roger Ebert's predictions in 1987, these prognostications can turn out to be both right and wrong. What's important, though, is that an educated public is taking note.

A number of filmmakers have taken to seminars and trades recently, to weigh in on the future of filmmaking in our ever-increasingly digital world. Below, we've collected ten of our favorite directorial divinations so that you can decide for yourself where you stand:

George Lucas, in conversation with Steven Spielberg:

“You’re going to end up with fewer theaters, bigger theaters with a lot of nice things. Going to the movies will cost 50 bucks or 100 or 150 bucks, like what Broadway costs today, or a football game. It’ll be an expensive thing. … (The movies) will sit in the theaters for a year, like a Broadway show does. That will be called the ‘movie’ business...

“There’ll be big movies on a big screen, and it’ll cost them a lot of money. Everything else will be on a small screen. It’s almost that way now. ‘Lincoln’ and ‘Red Tails’ barely got into theaters. You’re talking about Steven Spielberg and George Lucas can’t get their movies into theaters.”

Spielberg: “I believe we need to get rid of the proscenium,” Spielberg said. “We’re never going to be totally immersive as long as we’re looking at a square, whether it’s a movie screen or whether it’s a computer screen. We’ve got to get rid of that and we’ve got to put the player inside the experience, where no matter where you look you’re surrounded by a three-dimensional experience. That’s the future.”

David Lynch, in an interview with The Independent:

“It’s a very depressing picture. With alternative cinema—any sort of cinema that isn’t mainstream—you’re fresh out of luck in terms of getting theater space and having people come to see it.

“Even if I had a big idea, the world is different now. Unfortunately, my ideas are not what you’d call commercial, and money really drives the boat these days. So I don’t know what my future is. I don’t have a clue what I’m going to be able to do in the world of cinema.”

Steven Soderbergh, in his "State-of-Cinema Address":

"You can take a perfectly solid, successful and acclaimed movie and it may not qualify as cinema. It also means you can take a piece of cinema and it may not qualify as a movie, and it may actually be an unwatchable piece of shit. But as long as you have filmmakers out there who have that specific point of view, then cinema is never going to disappear completely. Because it’s not about money, it’s about good ideas followed up by a well-developed aesthetic."

James Cameron to Smithsonian Magazine:

"I think there will be movie thea*ters in 1,000 years. People want the group experience, the sense of going out and participating in a film together. People have been predicting the demise of movie theaters since I started in the business."

Martin Scorsese, in an open letter:

"The art of cinema and the movie business are now at a crossroads. Audio-visual entertainment and what we know as cinema—moving pictures conceived by individuals—appear to be headed in different directions. In the future, you’ll probably see less and less of what we recognize as cinema on multiplex screens and more and more of it in smaller theaters, online, and, I suppose, in spaces and circumstances that I can’t predict."

Keanu Reeves, writing for The Guardian:

"The rise of digital technology has prompted a lot of debate about the 'death of film.' If you'd asked me six months ago if we were at that point I'd have said the situation was dire. Fuji announced it was not going to produce commercial stock any more, companies such as Panavision and Arri have stopped making new film cameras...

"But it's unlikely that film will completely vanish, at least in the near future. I wouldn't call it a backlash against digital, but there is a significant body of directors still using film for image acquisition. It's important that they have the tools to make films in the way they want to. I'm certainly much less worried about the fate of celluloid than I was when I started making the documentary [Side by Side]."

Creator Chris Milk, on working with Oculus Rift:

“At the beginning of cinema they were shooting trains coming at cameras and everyone was freaking out. This is a language that has been established over many, many years. I don’t know what these new stories are going to look like … but I’m creating the tools now to hopefully figure out what the language and narratives of this new evolving storytelling canvas eventually will be.”

"Drone-wielding filmmaker" Caroline Campbell, on working with drones:

"We feel that it is no more intrusive than something like Google Street View,” and on using them to peer inside the Facebook offices: “Our argument is that Facebook has no expectation of privacy as their founder Mark Zuckerberg at one stage said privacy was no longer a social norm.”

Whatever your position may be, it's no small feat for the imagination to decipher what'll happen in five years time, let alone tomorrow. Then again, that's why they're filmmakers.

http://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/b...future-of-film
 
Old February 1st, 2015 #7
Roger Bannon
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http://www.tessgerritsen.com/gravity...lls-hollywood/

Quote:
. Every writer who sells film rights to Hollywood must now contend with the possibility that the studio they signed the contract with could be swallowed up by a larger company and that parent company can then make a movie based on your book without compensating you. It means Hollywood contracts are worthless.
 
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