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Old March 11th, 2008 #81
RebelWithACause
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Homeschoolers Sweep Mock Trial District
2 Teams To Compete At State Competition
posted March 10, 2008

Two Chattanooga Homeschool Mock Trial Teams captured the opportunity to compete in the 28th annual Tennessee Bar Association High School Mock Trial Competition. The teams, affiliated with Family Christian Academy, will represent the district and compete in Nashville, March 14 and 15.

FCA Red and FCA Blue won first and second place in the district final championship round against 18 private and public school teams. The Honorable Judge Moon and attorney Christian Coder were the presiding judges for the trials held at the Cherry Street Courts Building sponsored by the Chattanooga Bar Association.

Attorney Jeff Atherton has coached the homeschoolers’ mock trial teams in Chattanooga for 17 years and this will be the third time he has taken two teams to the state competition. Nathaniel Goggans, attorney, participated in high school mock trial with Coach Atherton and has joined him in coaching the teams the past two years.

The homeschoolers have consecutively competed at the state level for 11 years, and is the only group/school in the nation to win three national High School Mock Trial titles, in 2002, 2003 and 2007.

This year’s competition is a civil case involving a car accident with the injured passenger suing the car’s driver for medical expenses and other damages. The case centers on whether the driver was telephone “texting” while driving and may have caused the accident. At the Tennessee Bar Association High School Mock Trial Competition, FCA Blue and FCA Red will be competing against the other district winners from across Tennessee.

http://www.chattanoogan.com/articles/article_123678.asp
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Old March 14th, 2008 #82
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Will a California ruling reshape homeschooling?

By David Zizzo

Somewhere between $14 and $60,000 a year. Or more. That's what homeschooling can cost, depending on how you look at it.

But before you start paying for it, you've got to get started in your homeschooling career. That's easy, particularly in Oklahoma, says Marcus Hulings, treasurer and conventions director for the Oklahoma Christian Home Educators Consociation, one of the state's largest homeschooling organizations.


Oklahoma is friendly territory for homeschooling because of a phrase inserted in the original state constitution by a farmer/legislator, Hulings said. Section XIII-4 states that "The Legislature shall provide for the compulsory attendance at some public or other school, unless other means of education are provided...” (emphasis added.) For thousands of Oklahoma families, that other means is homeschooling.

On getting started
If you are parents with young children who have never been in public school, you just start teaching, Hulings said. "That's it. You don't have to do anything.”

However, if you pull your older child out of a public school to begin homeschooling, you must notify the school in writing that the child is withdrawing. "If there's no notification, the school can claim them as a truant student” and can send an officer to check on the child, he said.

There are no standards, organized testing or other government requirements for homeschooling in Oklahoma, he said, although most homeschool parents test their children to assure they meet achievement levels of their counterparts in public schools.

Hulings, who along with his wife homeschooled two of their three sons, said homeschooling can be very economical. Teaching through the first two or three grades can be accomplished with a set of books that cost $14.

After that, you can buy new books for a few hundred dollars a year, or you can buy them used for pennies on the dollar.

"There's used material around, especially if you're in a support group,” Hulings said.

Other costs add up
Other costs can include transportation, membership fees in museums or support organizations, uniforms for sports and musical instruments. Although some parents pay $25 to $75 an hour for tutors in some subjects, many belong to "co-ops” in which parents with skill in certain subjects volunteer to teach courses. Homeschool lessons can be anything, Hulings said. A trip to the grocery store, for instance, he said.

If one jar has 250 slices of pickles while another has 140 but is only 10 cents cheaper, which one's cheaper per sandwich? "That's a math problem,” Hulings said. "Everything's a learning process.”

In support groups, costs can even drop to zero for curriculum, books, sports equipment or other materials if parents simply pass their used and unneeded items down to families with younger children.

"We don't really sit down and figure out what it costs to homeschool our students,” Hulings said.

One estimate: $3,200
Some people have though. According to Homefires, an online homeschooling journal, the average family responding to a survey conducted in San Francisco spent $3,200 a year. However, none of this accounts for what is likely the largest expense of homeschooling.

"Lost income is probably the biggest opportunity cost of homeschooling,” homeschooler Barbara Frank wrote in Home Educator's Family Times magazine. She estimated homeschooling was costing her family up to $60,000 a year in her lost wages, while the cost would be more for others with higher potential salaries.

Hulings agrees the family income effect can be great.

"It is a major decision and it changes your lifestyle,” he said.

http://newsok.com/article/3216086/1205467595

[No mention of what the parents and child gain from homeschooling.]
 
Old March 14th, 2008 #83
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BTL on ridiculous anti-HS editorial in LAT

http://principleddiscovery.com/2008/...ti-democratic/
 
Old March 16th, 2008 #84
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[More alternative structures: HSers build alternative athletic programs.]


Growing Cheers for the Home-Schooled Team
By JOE DRAPE

OKLAHOMA CITY — Taber Spani, one of the best high school girls basketball players in the nation, holds hands with two opponents as a coach reads a Bible verse. It is the way each game in the National Christian Homeschool Basketball Championships begins.

This is more than a postseason tournament for the 300 boys and girls teams from 19 states that have competed here over the past six days. As the stands packed with parents and the baselines overrun by small children attest, this is also a jamboree to celebrate faith and family.

“You build friendships here with other girls who know what it’s like to be self-motivated and disciplined and share your values,” said Spani, a junior who plays for the Metro Academy Mavericks of Olathe, Kan. “I wouldn’t trade this tournament for anything.”

Only a decade ago, home-school athletics was considered little more than organized recess for children without traditional classrooms. Now, home-school players are tracked by scouts, and dozens of them have accepted scholarships to colleges as small as Blue Mountain in Mississippi and as well known as Iowa State.

When the field for the N.C.A.A. women’s basketball tournament is selected Monday, there will be plenty more evidence that standout players can be plucked from a prayer circle as well as from a playground. Rachel McLeod of Liberty University, Corrie Hester of Oral Roberts and Shalin Spani of Kansas State, Taber’s older sister, all played in the national home-school tournament.

Taber Spani, however, is the movement’s most celebrated player. Two coaching giants in women’s college basketball, Connecticut’s Geno Auriemma and Tennessee’s Pat Summitt, who between them have won 12 national titles, are pursuing her.

An estimated two million children are schooled at home, and only 18 states have laws that grant them access to athletic teams at public schools. So it was perhaps inevitable that home-school programs and tournaments developed.

“As the home-school movement has gotten older, there has been much more demand for extracurricular activities,” said Ian M. Slatter, a spokesman for the Home School Legal Defense Association. “Parents had already crossed the hurdle of educating children at home, so now they have turned their energy and resources to athletics.”

Many of the best teams here were founded by some of the home-school athletic movement’s pioneers. In 1992, Tom Sanders bought some reversible jerseys and founded the Homeschool Christian Youth Association Warriors in Houston so his 14-year-old son could play organized basketball with his friends. He had to plead with small Christian schools, even reform schools, to schedule 14 games that season.

By 1998, Sanders’s program had sent Kevin Johnson, a 6-foot-8 center, to the University of Tulsa on a scholarship. Before this tournament, the Warriors had a 33-3 record against some of the best high school teams in Texas. Sanders’s son Jesse will play for Rice next season. The Warriors were represented by 12 teams and more than 100 players last week.

Likewise, Tim Flatt has built the Oklahoma City Storm into a feared opponent among the state’s high schools the past 10 years. His program has 125 boys and girls, ages 8 to 18, on 11 teams. As with most home-school groups, it was built on word of mouth and financed out of parents’ pockets and the occasional bake sale.

“We went from not being very good to not being scheduled again after we beat some big schools,” said Flatt, whose varsity boys team was 20-6 this season. “The culture has changed, and there is less of a stigma if you lose to a home-school team. It’s not a slap in the face now when we beat a high school team. They know we make them better for their state playoffs.”

In 2001, Flatt, a retired sports memorabilia dealer, took the National Christian Homeschool Basketball Championships here. He wanted to create not only a basketball showcase, but also a destination for families. He understood that fielding a home-school team remained an independent and often taxing endeavor. Rounding up opponents is a grind, as is raising as much as $20,000 annually for uniforms, renting gyms and traveling to tournaments.

“A lot of home-school teams play in small gyms, church gyms, and they play against weaker competition,” Flatt said. “They don’t get to experience something at a national scale. I wanted to make the kids feel like they were getting big-time treatment, and their parents want to take a week of vacation to come here.”

Flatt’s vision was on full display Wednesday at the 5,000-seat Sawyer Center at Southern Nazarene University. It was standing room only as parents and children shared pizza and watched the National Christian Homeschool all-American boys and girls teams compete in all-star games, as well as 3-point and dunk contests.

“There’s an aura about home-schoolers that we’re nerds with Coke-bottle glasses,” said Adam Krejci, who plays at nearby Oklahoma Christian University and helps with the tournament. “When you start talking about players like Taber, and you watch some of the teams and players coming through here, it is hard to laugh at us.”

There was little doubt that Wednesday night belonged to Spani, a 6-1 left-handed guard. She drained 3-pointers, used nifty moves to score driving baskets, and hit teammates with precise no-look passes. It was difficult to tell who was more appreciative — the fans who cheered her or her parents, Gary and Stacey.

The Spanis knew they wanted to home-school their five daughters but were more aware than most how important sports might become to them. Gary is a former all-American linebacker at Kansas State who played nine seasons for the Kansas City Chiefs in the National Football League.; Stacey is the daughter of Frosty Westering, who won four national titles as the football coach at Pacific Lutheran University.

“Our Christian faith is No. 1 why we did it,” Gary Spani said of why he and Stacey chose to home-school their children. “We’re team oriented, and we wanted to make sure our family was supporting one another. We also agreed that when our daughters reached eighth grade, we’d let them decide if they wanted to go to high school.”

So far Shalin, Taber and Tanis, a sophomore, have decided to stay home and play for Stacey, who coached the Mavericks to a 30-5 record against high schools in Kansas and Missouri this season. Chances are good that Sajel, in seventh grade, and Taris, in fourth grade, will also decide to keep their mother as their teacher and coach. It means that the Spanis will leave at 5:20 a.m. for the long drive to practice each day for eight more seasons.

“It’s a family thing — I wanted the opportunity to be with my sisters constantly,” Taber Spani said of continuing to be home-schooled. “It really was an easy decision. I never felt like I was going to be missed by colleges.”

She has, indeed, gotten looks from college recruiters, and more than 100 Division I teams have contacted her. Still, Spani says she is in no hurry to decide between Connecticut or Tennessee. She may even join her sister Shalin at Kansas State, their parents’ alma mater.

“No matter where I go, I’ll be ready,” she said. “No matter where I go, I’ll also miss this tournament. It really has been the highlight of my high school experience.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/16/sp...nt&oref=slogin
 
Old March 16th, 2008 #85
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[Out of 2,000 comments, the SF liberal chooses these "three different views"]

READERS' PLATFORM
Who needs teachers? Who needs credentials?

Andrew S. Ross

Last week was not a good one for the state's public school teachers. Not only are up to 10,000 of them facing pink slips, thanks to Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's budget proposals, but their entire raison d'etre has been called into question during the raging debate over homeschooling. The recent state appeals court ruling that would impose stricter credentialing requirements on homeschooling was denounced by Schwarzenegger, not to mention newspaper editorials and opinion pieces.

Given its parlous condition, "who needs public education anyway?" was a common sentiment expressed by Chronicle readers on SFGate. Many seemed to believe that qualifications to teach were about as tough to obtain as the ability to flip burgers. As one Bay Area teacher remarked on SFGate, everything she has gone through seems to have produced, at the end of the day, just one thing: "People on message boards insult all of your efforts."

Below, edited for space, are three differing views, drawn from the more than 2,000 homeschool comments on SFGate.

- Andrew S. Ross, Chronicle Interactive Editor

Doing something right

Lack of respect for teaching as a profession seems to be a phenomenon unique to the United States (and the Middle East). My goal is to help students develop the ability to acquire knowledge, filter out the garbage, and draw their own conclusions about the meaning of the information.

My school's (Academic Performance Index) is in the high 700s. We are also identified as low income on the Federal Register. We must be doing something right.

Sure, homeschooled kids have a better adult-to-student ratio, and homeschooling parents have the power to discipline a misbehaving or underperforming student in ways that a teacher does not. If teachers had those luxuries, their students would perform at or above the same level.

If the system would allow us to fail those students without being punished for it, we would. We are also threatened with lawsuits. If too many students fail, (No Child Left Behind) punishes us. If students are passed and don't deserve it, we are punished.

Perhaps if we were allowed to make the professional decisions we were hired to make without having to answer to a bunch of bureaucrats and selfish parents, we could do what you say we don't. A better approach is to examine what public schools are doing right and emulate that, and figure out what's wrong that can be fixed.

- John Middleton, 42, San Diego

Putting our money where our mouth is

I teach middle school, and I have a bachelor of arts degree, a master of arts degree, and am (working) on my doctorate. I have gone through two credentialing processes to become a certified teacher.

California teachers have the toughest licensing requirements in the nation. The reason our schools have declined in quality over the last 25 years is the decline in revenue from local property taxes (directly related to the passage of Proposition 13 in 1978). Localities contribute almost 50 percent of the education budget for districts and schools, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

If we, as a society, put our money where our mouth is - teacher salaries are pitiful - we would have better schools. We're not willing to pay for it, though.

- Bryan Johnson, 30, Los Angeles

Rights - and obligations

Why is it such a burden to the homeschooling parent to become state accredited? If their knowledge and teaching abilities are superior to the average public school teacher, as many seem to believe, then what's the big deal - it should be a piece of cake, right? Any state has the right to control the education system to make sure that every child is given the chance at a quality education (emphasis on the word "chance").

If it can be shown that a parent meets the minimum standards the state has put forth for teaching, then more power to that parent. If homeschooler parents don't have to be credentialed, why should public school teachers have to get credentials? If parents want the "right" (too many people think we have the right to do many things which are simply privileges) to homeschool their children, then they ought to be vetted.

They ought to be able to prove themselves. Sometimes we've got to do things we don't like or agree with to get what we want.

- Jason Andre, 28, Portage, Mich. ("recently of Vacaville")

E-mail Andrew S. Ross at [email protected].

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl.../IN04VI14C.DTL


[Three views straight from the NEA. The bottom line is public schooling is a bad idea. It's also tyranny. HSers are forced to pay to subsidize views they hate, while the tyrants try to prevent them from outing out of the system at their own cost! Then the jew-controlled media back the teachers unions because they're part of the same government-education-media complex.]
 
Old March 16th, 2008 #86
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[Why does homeschooling exist? Because jews have forcibly integrated human children with niggers and mexcrement.]


CELL PHONE CAMERA CAPTURES NASTY BUSINESS

Bouncing off the California appellate court homeschooling decision, bloggers and homeschoolers have been buzzing about cell-phone camera videos of classroom chaos posted on YouTube.com. Iowa State University education professor Scott McLeod posted them at DangerouslyIrrelevent.com to ask whether students should get in trouble for posting such videos. Homeschool supporter Steve Olson at TheFreeSavage.com comments, "No wonder they want to ban cell phones in school buildings. ... Remember only large government institutions and licensed professionals can deliver service like this." Has he ever asked for help in a Wal-Mart? Then again, Wal-Mart doesn't expect you to pay a fortune in property taxes to support it whether your kids go there or not.

http://www.thefreesavage.com/2008/03...ool-classroom/
 
Old March 16th, 2008 #87
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John Stuart Mill said, “a general state education is a mere contrivance for molding people to be exactly like one another … [which] establishes a despotism over the mind, leading by natural tendency to one over the body.”
 
Old March 16th, 2008 #88
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With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

by Greg Perry

I’m not surprised by California’s attack on homeschooling. I’m surprised people are surprised.

California despises freedom unless you’re an illegal Mexican (one who President Bush so lovingly calls "Guest Worker"). Even some LewRockwell.com readers have written me saying I should not use the term illegal Mexican. I don’t understand why not. When statistically 100% of illegal immigrants are Mexican why is it incorrect to call them what they are? I don’t hate Mexicans. Using such an accurate term helps pinpoint the problem instead of hiding the destruction it causes. Are we just going to start throwing away adjectives from daily usage now?

http://www.lewrockwell.com/perry/perry41.html
 
Old March 19th, 2008 #89
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Raymond & Dorothy Moore

Almost simultaneously, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, educational professionals Raymond and Dorothy Moore began to research the academic validity of the rapidly growing Early Childhood Education movement. This research included independent studies by other researchers and a review of over 8,000 studies bearing on Early Childhood Education and the physical and mental development of children.

They asserted that formal schooling before ages 8–12 not only lacked the anticipated effectiveness, but was actually harmful to children, particularly boys (due to their lag in maturity). The Moores began to publish their view that formal schooling was damaging young children academically, socially, mentally, and even physiologically. They presented evidence that childhood problems such as juvenile delinquency, nearsightedness, increased enrollment of students in special education classes, and behavioral problems were the result of increasingly earlier enrollment of students.[8] The Moores cited studies demonstrating that orphans who were given surrogate mothers were measurably more intelligent, with superior long term effects – even though the mothers were mentally retarded teenagers – and that illiterate tribal mothers in Africa produced children who were socially and emotionally more advanced than typical western children, by western standards of measurement.[8]

Their primary assertion was that the bonds and emotional development made at home with parents during these years produced critical long term results that were cut short by enrollment into schools, and could neither be replaced nor afterward corrected in an institutional setting.[8] Recognizing a necessity for early out-of-home care for some children — particularly special needs and starkly impoverished children, and children from exceptionally inferior homes — they maintained that the vast majority of children are far better situated at home — even with mediocre parents — than with the most gifted and motivated teachers in a school setting (assuming that the child has a gifted and motivated teacher). They described the difference as follows: "This is like saying, if you can help a child by taking him off the cold street and housing him in a warm tent, then warm tents should be provided for all children — when obviously most children already have even more secure housing."[9]

Similar to Holt, the Moores embraced homeschooling after the publication of their first work, Better Late Than Early, 1975, and went on to become important homeschool advocates and consultants with the publication of books like Home Grown Kids, 1981, Home School Burnout, and others.[8]

One common theme in the homeschool philosophies of both Holt and the Moores is that home education should not be an attempt to bring the school construct into the home, or a view of education as an academic preliminary to life. They viewed it as a natural, experiential aspect of life that occurs as the members of the family are involved with one another in daily living.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeschooling
 
Old March 20th, 2008 #90
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Quote:
After that, you can buy new books for a few hundred dollars a year, or you can buy them used for pennies on the dollar.
Books yes , but computers have become more important . An entire life's reading can be put on one SD card . Computer programs to drill on math , spelling , grammar etc. can be made to create infinite practice problems , which a book can't . Additionally , computers can self-tailor practice problems to emphasize the places where the student has particular difficulty , so the learners understanding is more complete .

Animation , which is impossible in a book , can show complex concepts. Such as engine dynamics , chemical concepts and a myriad of other ideas .

The power of the computer in education hasn't even begun .
 
Old March 21st, 2008 #91
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Computers are good for looking things up, they're not good for reading full books on.

The head must be over the material being read for it to be properly absorbed.
 
Old March 23rd, 2008 #92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
Computers are good for looking things up, they're not good for reading full books on.
TTS ( text to speech ) . Audio Books in MP3 . Durant's "Story of Civilization" , all 11 volumes in MP3 on one DVD , text on one CD . Project Gutenberg , Librivox.com , booksshouldbefree.com, americanaphonic.com etc.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
The head must be over the material being read for it to be properly absorbed.
Chin on pillow looking down at notebook on nightstand below , counts ?
 
Old March 24th, 2008 #93
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WHITE CHILDREN FLEE STATE SCHOOLS
AUSTRALIA CALLING

(3/18/08) White Australian parents are pulling their children out of government schools in huge numbers and paying for private education free of niggers and Lebs, a secret government report has revealed.

http://www.nsm88radio.com/Aussie%20calling/AC031608.mp3

[Country doesn't matter. Whites always react the same way to muds, whether in Australia or in America. That proves two things: that the White race exists, and that it prefers its ways to jew-foreign ways.]
 
Old March 25th, 2008 #94
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Private Colleges Proliferating, Worldwide

With the demand for higher education ever-growing and unmet internationally, the private sector continues to grow. A paper to be presented this week at the Comparative and International Education Society conference in New York explores global patterns in the growth of private higher education – how it increases access and who for, how private institutions expand, and what the worries are.

“Fewer and fewer countries disallow private higher education, whereas many did several decades back,” writes Daniel C. Levy, a professor and director of the Program for Research on Private Higher Education at the State University of New York at Albany. “Furthermore, while private growth has often exploded unexpectedly and on the fringes of legislation, it has also emerged where laws have been liberalized” – in various Indian states and Chinese provinces, for instance. Whereas private education earlier developed in Latin America outside of a “state directive,” it’s increasingly common, Levy writes, for governments in Asia, Eastern Europe, Africa and the Middle East “to articulate a rationale for private access.” In the context of the report and international higher education, “private” can mean nonprofit, for-profit or somewhere in between.

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2008/03/19/private
 
Old March 25th, 2008 #95
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From the January, 2003 issue of Harper's magazine ("Harper's Index" page):

"Percentage change since 1900 in the number of U.S. schoolchildren labeled 'disabled': +37.

Percentage of U.S. high schools receiving federal aid whose students' contact information the army sought last fall: 100.

Average amount of aid each school district stands to lose if its schools do not supply the information: $762,083.

Page of the No Child Left Behind education law passed last year on which this new requirement is noted: 559."
 
Old March 27th, 2008 #96
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I have a question about homeschooling in Ireland. Personally I love the idea of home schooling my daughter, and future children, but I was wondering if Ireland allows this and what are the statistics of home schooled Irish kids vs. Schooled Irish kids? Meaning are they smarter, etc. I am not sure how well the school system is here, but seeing as each year this country is going down hill I can only imagine by the time she does start school they will be teaching a lot of things I wish my child were not taught.

Also what do you need to do or know as a parent in order to home school your child? I am a good at Math but bad at English (good at writing essays though) and I know in Ireland you must learn Gaelic in order to graduate, in which case I do not know Gaelic as I am not of Irish descent but I am a quick learner and was at one point going to make a career of learning and knowing languages.

Any info would be helpful. I was thinking of letting her go to preschool and kindergarten and then homeschool her as I do want her to socialize with other white children but from what I have read on here home schooled children that were home schooled before entering hish school tend to be more intelligent. I am at a loss of what to do at this time as her attending school is in the future and again I do not know if the schooling here will be as bad as everywhere else when the time comes for her to begin school.
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Old March 27th, 2008 #97
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Summer View Post
I have a question about homeschooling in Ireland. Personally I love the idea of home schooling my daughter, and future children, but I was wondering if Ireland allows this.
In Ireland although the constitution says you have a right to teach your children at home there is a system of assessment and registration.

If you don't pass the assessment then you won't be registered, and if you are not registered you can't home school.

Here's the assessment booklet, in pdf format:

http://www.education.ie/servlet/blob..._education.pdf
 
Old March 27th, 2008 #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francis Playfair View Post
In Ireland although the constitution says you have a right to teach your children at home there is a system of assessment and registration.

If you don't pass the assessment then you won't be registered, and if you are not registered you can't home school.

Here's the assessment booklet, in pdf format:

http://www.education.ie/servlet/blob..._education.pdf
Thank you for your information. I will add that to my favourites and definately look into it. I do not know if you live in Ireland or who on this forum does but it would be nice to hear from someone who does live here and has attended school here to give me an outlook on how the schooling is and if it is going downhill or not. I can tell that the students alone are going downhill by seeing whom they hang out with (niggers) on lunch breaks and how short the girls shorten their skirts during schooltime, but that does not necessarily mean the schooling is bad.
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Old March 29th, 2008 #99
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Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA) is the first place to go for HS news

Here's there Ireland info:

http://www.hslda.org/hs/internationa...nd/default.asp

Home page:

http://www.hslda.org/
 
Old March 30th, 2008 #100
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francis Playfair View Post
In Ireland although the constitution says you have a right to teach your children at home there is a system of assessment and registration.

If you don't pass the assessment then you won't be registered, and if you are not registered you can't home school.
Does this 'assessment' include appropriate holocaust indoctrination ?
 
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