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Old July 12th, 2009 #21
KellyThorensen
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If a miracle happens and I'm able to homeschool my daughter (I have a few years until she is school age), how do I go about getting the text books and things?
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Old July 12th, 2009 #22
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I can send you a bunch of German text books. Even ones in the pre-capitulation alphabet. Problem is: You'll need a tutor
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Old July 12th, 2009 #23
KellyThorensen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kind Lampshade Maker View Post
I can send you a bunch of German text books. Even ones in the pre-capitulation alphabet. Problem is: You'll need a tutor
I took a little German in high school, but yeah, I probably wouldn't be able to get past the first page.
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Old July 12th, 2009 #24
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I could tutor you, while a native German speaker tutors your daughter
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Old July 12th, 2009 #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kind Lampshade Maker View Post
I could tutor you, while a native German speaker tutors your daughter
Uh huh.
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Old August 2nd, 2009 #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KellyThorensen View Post
If a miracle happens and I'm able to homeschool my daughter (I have a few years until she is school age), how do I go about getting the text books and things?
Contact your local school board. Most states will supply, free of charge textbooks. Otherwise, find a website and purchase your choice in textbooks.

Or, you can take the route of "unschooling." I would not recommend "unschooling." Most of the homeschooling parents I have come in contact with choose "unschooling." They preach on it. They preach how it is not as important to learn the three r's as it is to learn "other" things. Whatever the "other" things are that they are referring to, I have no clue (perhaps they are talking about Xtianity type things ). It is pretty sad when an "unschooled" child cannot read at the age of 8 and the parent says "reading just isn't his thing."

Then you have homeschooling parents who brag on things such as "I've been homeschooling my children for 20 years and I have written their diplomas and they're legitimate." Really? Some homeschooling parents will go to great lengths with such lies to convince other parents their way is the right way. No school of higher learning is going to accept a diploma written by a homeschooling parent with a bogus school that is usually named after the parent. Homeschoolers who may choose to go on to higher learning are required to have a GED to be accepted into that institution.

Home schooling has it's +'s and -'s just as public schooling has +'s and -'s.

A parent can send their child to public school and educate them at home too. It depends on how much time you choose to spend with your child correcting incorrect school learning.
 
Old August 4th, 2009 #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kristina View Post
Contact your local school board. Most states will supply, free of charge textbooks. Otherwise, find a website and purchase your choice in textbooks.
The whole point of HS is NOT to use public school textbooks. If they were using good books, there wouldn't be any problem sending your kid to them. Instead they use history books filled with lies and anti-White teaching. They use books that teach math and reading by perverse methods.

Research on the 'Net to find the best stuff for teaching kids whatever you want to teach them, then buy it online.
 
Old August 12th, 2009 #28
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Govt of Sweden to Ban Homeschooling:

http://www.lifesitenews.com/ldn/2009/aug/09081104.html
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Old August 13th, 2009 #29
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The homeschoolers should ban Sweden.

The philosophy (I think psychology) of Plato is behind this state worship.

It is the form of the ideal, which is considered to be "reality."

Reality is not the stuff you're looking at right now.

As Mussolini put it-

"The Fascist conception of the State is all embracing; outside of it no human or spiritual values can exist, much less have value. Thus understood, Fascism, is totalitarian, and the Fascist State - a synthesis and a unit inclusive of all values - interprets, develops, and potentates the whole life of a people"

You see, anything outside of the STATE does not count!
Of course, this includes non-government schooling.
If the STATE is reality, then those outside the state are outside reality and are therefore insane! And must be coerced (or treated) for the good of all! The Soviets called this sluggish schizophrenia! Have some Soma! Or prozac!

http://www.worldfuturefund.org/wffma.../mussolini.htm
 
Old August 28th, 2009 #30
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New Nationwide Study Confirms Homeschool Academic Achievement

Ian Slatter
Director of Media Relations

August 10, 2009

Each year, the homeschool movement graduates at least 100,000 students. Due to the fact that both the United States government and homeschool advocates agree that homeschooling has been growing at around 7% per annum for the past decade, it is not surprising that homeschooling is gaining increased attention. Consequently, many people have been asking questions about homeschooling, usually with a focus on either the academic or social abilities of homeschool graduates.

As an organization advocating on behalf of homeschoolers, Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA) long ago committed itself to demonstrating that homeschooling should be viewed as a mainstream educational alternative.

We strongly believe that homeschooling is a thriving education movement capable of producing millions of academically and socially able students who will have a tremendously positive effect on society.

Despite much resistance from outside the homeschool movement, whether from teachers unions, politicians, school administrators, judges, social service workers, or even family members, over the past few decades homeschoolers have slowly but surely won acceptance as a mainstream education alternative. This has been due in part to the commissioning of research which demonstrates the academic success of the average homeschooler.

The last piece of major research looking at homeschool academic achievement was completed in 1998 by Dr. Lawrence Rudner. Rudner, a professor at the ERIC Clearinghouse, which is part of the University of Maryland, surveyed over 20,000 homeschooled students. His study, titled Home Schooling Works, discovered that homeschoolers (on average) scored about 30 percentile points higher than the national average on standardized achievement tests.

This research and several other studies supporting the claims of homeschoolers have helped the homeschool cause tremendously. Today, you would be hard pressed to find an opponent of homeschooling who says that homeschoolers, on average, are poor academic achievers.

There is one problem, however. Rudner’s research was conducted over a decade ago. Without another look at the level of academic achievement among homeschooled students, critics could begin to say that research on homeschool achievement is outdated and no longer relevant.

Recognizing this problem, HSLDA commissioned Dr. Brian Ray, an internationally recognized scholar and president of the non-profit National Home Education Research Institute (NHERI), to collect data for the 2007–08 academic year for a new study which would build upon 25 years of homeschool academic scholarship conducted by Ray himself, Rudner, and many others.

Drawing from 15 independent testing services, the Progress Report 2009: Homeschool Academic Achievement and Demographics included 11,739 homeschooled students from all 50 states who took three well-known tests—California Achievement Test, Iowa Tests of Basic Skills, and Stanford Achievement Test for the 2007–08 academic year. The Progress Report is the most comprehensive homeschool academic study ever completed.

The Results

Overall the study showed significant advances in homeschool academic achievement as well as revealing that issues such as student gender, parents’ education level, and family income had little bearing on the results of homeschooled students.

National Average Percentile Scores
Subtest Homeschool Public School
Reading 89 50
Language 84 50
Math 84 50
Science 86 50
Social Studies 84 50
Core a 88 50
Composite b 86 50

a. Core is a combination of Reading, Language, and Math.
b. Composite is a combination of all subtests that the student took on the test.

There was little difference between the results of homeschooled boys and girls on core scores.

Boys—87th percentile
Girls—88th percentile

Household income had little impact on the results of homeschooled students.

$34,999 or less—85th percentile
$35,000–$49,999—86th percentile
$50,000–$69,999—86th percentile
$70,000 or more—89th percentile

The education level of the parents made a noticeable difference, but the homeschooled children of non-college educated parents still scored in the 83rd percentile, which is well above the national average.

Neither parent has a college degree—83rd percentile
One parent has a college degree—86th percentile
Both parents have a college degree—90th percentile

Whether either parent was a certified teacher did not matter.

Certified (i.e., either parent ever certified)—87th percentile
Not certified (i.e., neither parent ever certified)—88th percentile

Parental spending on home education made little difference.

Spent $600 or more on the student—89th percentile
Spent under $600 on the student—86th percentile

The extent of government regulation on homeschoolers did not affect the results.

Low state regulation—87th percentile
Medium state regulation—88th percentile
High state regulation—87th percentile

HSLDA defines the extent of government regulation this way:

States with low regulation: No state requirement for parents to initiate any contact or State requires parental notification only.

States with moderate regulation: State requires parents to send notification, test scores, and/or professional evaluation of student progress.

State with high regulation: State requires parents to send notification or achievement test scores and/or professional evaluation, plus other requirements (e.g. curriculum approval by the state, teacher qualification of parents, or home visits by state officials).

The question HSLDA regularly puts before state legislatures is, “If government regulation does not improve the results of homeschoolers why is it necessary?”

In short, the results found in the new study are consistent with 25 years of research, which show that as a group homeschoolers consistently perform above average academically. The Progress Report also shows that, even as the numbers and diversity of homeschoolers have grown tremendously over the past 10 years, homeschoolers have actually increased the already sizeable gap in academic achievement between themselves and their public school counterparts-moving from about 30 percentile points higher in the Rudner study (1998) to 37 percentile points higher in the Progress Report (2009).

As mentioned earlier, the achievement gaps that are well-documented in public school between boys and girls, parents with lower incomes, and parents with lower levels of education are not found among homeschoolers. While it is not possible to draw a definitive conclusion, it does appear from all the existing research that homeschooling equalizes every student upwards. Homeschoolers are actually achieving every day what the public schools claim are their goals—to narrow achievement gaps and to educate each child to a high level.

Of course, an education movement which consistently shows that children can be educated to a standard significantly above the average public school student at a fraction of the cost—the average spent by participants in the Progress Report was about $500 per child per year as opposed to the public school average of nearly $10,000 per child per year—will inevitably draw attention from the K-12 public education industry.

Answering the Critics

This particular study is the most comprehensive ever undertaken. It attempts to build upon and improve on the previous research. One criticism of the Rudner study was that it only drew students from one large testing service. Although there was no reason to believe that homeschoolers participating with that service were automatically non-representative of the broader homeschool community, HSLDA decided to answer this criticism by using 15 independent testing services for this new study. There can be no doubt that homeschoolers from all walks of life and backgrounds participated in the Progress Report.

While it is true that not every homeschooler in America was part of this study, it is also true that the Progress Report provides clear evidence of the success of homeschool programs.

The reason is that all social science studies are based on samples. The goal is to make the sample as representative as possible because then more confident conclusions can be drawn about the larger population. Those conclusions are then validated when other studies find the same or similar results.

Critics tend to focus on this narrow point and maintain that they will not be satisfied until every homeschooler is submitted to a test. This is not a reasonable request because not all homeschoolers take standardized achievement tests. In fact, while the majority of homeschool parents do indeed test their children simply to track their progress and also to provide them with the experience of test-taking, it is far from a comprehensive and universal practice among homeschoolers.

The best researchers can do is provide a sample of homeschooling families and compare the results of their children to those of public school students, in order to give the most accurate picture of how homeschoolers in general are faring academically.

The concern that the only families who chose to participate are the most successful homeschoolers can be alleviated by the fact that the overwhelming majority of parents did not know their children's test results before agreeing to participate in the study.

HSLDA believes that this study along with the several that have been done in the past are clear evidence that homeschoolers are succeeding academically.

Final Thought

Homeschooling is making great strides and hundreds of thousands of parents across America are showing every day what can be achieved when parents exercise their right to homeschool and make tremendous sacrifices to provide their children with the best education available.

http://www.hslda.org/docs/news/200908100.asp
 
Old September 11th, 2009 #31
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There is another difference between the old days of the blue back speller and McGuffey's Readers. Today, children begin school when they are six or seven years old. They are too young! Their physical brain has not developed sufficiently to grasp much of anything taught in any school.

If a child begins elementary school at age 12, he can learn in one year all that it now takes him 6 years to learn beginning school at age 7. Elementary school can be reduced to one year if a child begins school at age 12. He will also have already learned (picked-up) reading and writing from his parents and friends. And what need has a child to be educated before he is 12 years old?

How long does it take for a fully mature adult to obtain a G.E.D.? One year?

Why teach a 16 year-old Latin?

Why educate negroes?

Which would be more beneficial: learning foreign languages and taking courses in rhetoric, or learning about natural law and shamans?

Why is it that culture and refinement are always the culture and refinement of a foreign country, of another people?

I wasted two years of high school taking French. It was all about college prep. I went to the University of Texas in 1965. Do you know what you get from Liberal Arts? You get arty liberals. I went to business college where there were no hippies. But my economics teacher was a Marxist and my elective was sociology. The teacher was a real air-head fruit cake Liberal. I quit and ended up in Viet Nam. Nice place to be from.

The only real education anyone ever gets is from the school of hard knocks.
 
Old November 6th, 2009 #32
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Dumbest Generation Getting Dumber

The Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) is an international comparison of 15-year-olds conducted by The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) that measures applied learning and problem-solving ability. In 2006, U.S. students ranked 25th of 30 advanced nations in math and 24th in science. McKinsey & Company, in releasing its report "The Economic Impact of the Achievement Gap in America's Schools" (April 2009) said, "Several other facts paint a worrisome picture. First, the longer American children are in school, the worse they perform compared to their international peers. In recent cross-country comparisons of fourth grade reading, math, and science, US students scored in the top quarter or top half of advanced nations. By age 15 these rankings drop to the bottom half. In other words, American students are farthest behind just as they are about to enter higher education or the workforce." That's a sobering thought. The longer kids are in school and the more money we spend on them, the further behind they get.

While the academic performance of white students is grossly inferior, that of black and Latino students is a national disgrace. The McKinsey report says, "On average, black and Latino students are roughly two to three years of learning behind white students of the same age. This racial gap exists regardless of how it is measured, including both achievement (e.g., test score) and attainment (e.g., graduation rate) measures. Taking the average National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) scores for math and reading across the fourth and eighth grades, for example, 48 percent of blacks and 43 percent of Latinos are 'below basic,' while only 17 percent of whites are, and this gap exists in every state. A more pronounced racial achievement gap exists in most large urban school districts." Below basic is the category the NAEP uses for students unable to display even partial mastery of knowledge and skills fundamental for proficient work at their grade level.

The teaching establishment and politicians have hoodwinked taxpayers into believing that more money is needed to improve education. The Washington, D.C., school budget is about the nation's costliest, spending about $15,000 per pupil. Its student/teacher ratio, at 15.2 to 1, is lower than the nation's average. Yet student achievement is just about the lowest in the nation. What's so callous about the Washington situation is about 1,700 children in kindergarten through 12th grade receive the $7,500 annual scholarships in order to escape rotten D.C. public schools, and four times as many apply for the scholarships, yet Congress, beholden to the education establishment, will end funding the school voucher program.

Any long-term solution to our education problems requires the decentralization that can come from competition. Centralization has been massive. In 1930, there were 119,000 school districts across the U.S; today, there are less than 15,000. Control has moved from local communities to the school district, to the state, and to the federal government. Public education has become a highly centralized government-backed monopoly and we shouldn't be surprised by the results. It's a no-brainer that the areas of our lives with the greatest innovation, tailoring of services to individual wants and falling prices are the areas where there is ruthless competition such as computers, food, telephone and clothing industries, and delivery companies such as UPS, Federal Express and electronic bill payments that have begun to undermine the postal monopoly in first-class mail.

At a Washington press conference launching the McKinsey report, Al Sharpton called school reform the civil rights challenge of our time. He said that the enemy of opportunity for blacks in the U.S. was once Jim Crow; today, in a slap at the educational establishment, he said it was "Professor James Crow." Sharpton is only partly correct. School reform is not solely a racial issue; it's a vital issue for the entire nation.

Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University.

http://economics.gmu.edu/wew/article...tingDumber.htm
 
Old November 7th, 2009 #33
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The reason home school is successful is because it's generally done by the upper middle class with a higher education themselves, if it was being done by high school drop outs I am pretty sure many homeschooled kids would come out to be retards on the SATs.
 
Old November 7th, 2009 #34
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We use books and curriculum from Rod and Staff and Abeka. If you want more info on specifics or have trouble contacting them for a catalog, PM me.
 
Old November 10th, 2009 #35
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There is almost nothing that the government does which private industry couldn’t do more morally, cheaper and more efficiently. The Brookings Institute’s John Chubb once set out to find out how many bureaucrats work in the central administrative office of the New York City public school system. It took him 12 phone calls to find someone who knew the answer and would tell him: 6,000. Chubb then called the Archdiocese of New York to find out how many bureaucrats it takes to run the city’s Catholic schools, which educate one fifth the amount of students the public schools do:

“Chubb’s first telephone call was taken by someone who did not know the answer. Here we go again, he thought.

“But after a moment she said, ‘Wait a minute; let me count.’ Her answer: 26.”

What Paul doesn’t point out is that, with private competition, schools would be answerable to parents and couldn’t carry out multicultural indoctrination at will.

http://www.vdare.com/misc/091109_hoste.htm
 
Old November 13th, 2009 #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stronza View Post
Govt of Sweden to Ban Homeschooling:

http://www.lifesitenews.com/ldn/2009/aug/09081104.html
That doesn't surprise me from a country that forces boys to wear skirts to school in the name of sex equality.
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Old November 13th, 2009 #37
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The State is Reality.

Challenging the State equals challenging Reality
.

The challenger is mentally incompetent, or deluded.

All challengers need conservatorship.
 
Old February 17th, 2012 #38
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[good example of socialist regulation]

The Lunch Nazis Are Coming! No, They're Here.
Posted by Karen De Coster on February 15, 2012 05:09 AM

I really wish I was making this up. This is from the Carolina Journal Online:

A preschooler at West Hoke Elementary School ate three chicken nuggets for lunch Jan. 30 because a state employee told her the lunch her mother packed was not nutritious.

The girl’s turkey and cheese sandwich, banana, potato chips, and apple juice did not meet U.S. Department of Agriculture guidelines, according to the interpretation of the agent who was inspecting all lunch boxes in her More at Four classroom that day.

The Division of Child Development and Early Education at the Department of Health and Human Services requires all lunches served in pre-kindergarten programs — including in-home day care centers — to meet USDA guidelines. That means lunches must consist of one serving of meat, one serving of milk, one serving of grain, and two servings of fruit or vegetables, even if the lunches are brought from home.

When home-packed lunches do not include all of the required items, child care providers must supplement them with the missing ones.

The child was forced to eat processed chicken nuggets - after all, they meet the federal dietary guidelines! - in place of the lunch her mother chose for her. And the parents can be charged for the federalist foods provided to their children without their permission. Does this quote from the article bring you to the realization that you are sending your children to a centrally-planned, totalitarian gulag?

“With a turkey sandwich, that covers your protein, your grain, and if it had cheese on it, that’s the dairy,” said Jani Kozlowski, the fiscal and statutory policy manager for the division. “It sounds like the lunch itself would’ve met all of the standard.” The lunch has to include a fruit or vegetable, but not both, she said.

This is the consequence of a government's fascist "war" on obesity and its fraudulent health & wellness paradigm.

http://www.lewrockwell.com/blog/lewr...es/105822.html
 
Old February 29th, 2012 #39
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11 Reasons To Get Your Kids Out of the Government Schools

http://lewrockwell.com/rep3/get-your...t-schools.html
 
Old March 8th, 2012 #40
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I didn't read through this thread and I'm 5 years out of high school, but you've got to be obscenely ignorant to think sending your children to a public school won't seriously psychologically damage them. Your children will be completely brainwashed into Marxism and disciplined against listening to their natural instincts. Their friends and acquaintances will enforce and reflect the nigger-loving bullshit their teachers say and you'll hear your kids spew that faggot bullshit back at you.

I understand the problem people have when they say they don't want their children to be sheltered, but public school is not the solution. If you're going to raise children properly, raise them in white nationalist environment and community.

Teachers, leave them kids the fuck alone...
 
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