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Old February 8th, 2009 #1
Joe_J.
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I have been spreading compost all over my garden spot. Also using a garden claw to do some cultivating with. I don't need a tiller this year. Using a twenty foot by twenty five foot area. That doesn't sound big but you can get a lot in an area that size by wide row planting method, which is similar to what Whites in Rhodesia are doing so they don't starve.

Quote:
Because we have limited space and want to utilize every inch that is available, we have used this method in our garden for several years. With the rising cost of produce we consider this to be especially important. My vegetable beds are about four feet wide and 20 feet long. Here is an example of how much space this conserves: In one wide-row bed two feet long I can plant the equivalent of a 48-foot single row of garden carrots. Put another way, a bed four feet wide and 20 feet long seeded with carrots is the equivalent of 480 feet of carrots planted in a single row. Wide-row planting also means I can expect to harvest up to six times as much produce per foot.
I find that this method of gardening saves me a lot of time and it is important that I use my time to best advantage. Watering time is cut down because the lower foliage tends to shade the entire area and reduces evaporation. Also, because the crops are planted closer together, they tend to crowd out weeds. Fertilizer is conserved, too, because all the soil that has been prepared is utilized.
Using the wide-row method, more than one row is planted of a particular crop. For example, instead of planting a single row of bush beans, two are planted close together. To make the wide-row even wider, plant three, four, five or more rows close together. Spacing of plants in the rows will depend entirely on crops grown. Directions on the back of the seed packet will specify how close together that crop should be spaced.
Quote:
As in all vegetable gardening, the key to success is proper soil preparation. Take extra time to properly till or spade the soil to a depth of six to 12 inches. Mix in ample amounts of compost, if available, processed manure, well-rotted manure and an all-purpose vegetable garden fertilizer. After mixing these soil additives with the existing soil, rake the area level to eliminate low spots where water night collect and keep the soil cool. By mounding the planting area you will find the soil dries out and warms up sooner and crops reach maturity at an earlier date.
Plan the layout of the garden before you start planting, keeping in mind that tall-growing crops should be to the north. Otherwise, they would shade lower-growing plants.
http://www.humeseeds.com/widrow.htm

Last year, I had a great garden. I used nothing but miracle grow that you put in a garden hose sprayer bottle. I did that once a week. That was the only water things got unless it rained. No fertilizers at all. No pesticides. If I wanted that shit on my food, I would just nix the garden and buy frankenfoods at the grocery store. Also, look for heirloom seeds that are non GMO and can be reused next year.

I did have an infestation of mexican bean beetles and they eat more than beans. They wouldn't touch tomatoes but everything else was fair game to them. So, I am going to try neem oil this year, which a friend recommended. Supposed to be natural stuff. I am also going to try water and cayenne pepper in a spray bottle. I am told that keeps away pests.

Okay, anyone else got a garden going or have tips?
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Old March 1st, 2009 #2
Maxine Grey
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I have a herbs that beats the pests to the goodies.

  • Basil helps repel flies and mosquitoes.
  • Borage in the strawberry patch will increase the yield.
  • Catnip repels fleas, ants and rodents.
  • Caraway helps breakdown heavy soils.
  • Chamomile deters flies and mosquitoes and gives strength to any plant growing nearby.
  • Chives grown beneath apple trees will help to prevent apple scab; beneath roses will keep away aphids and blackspot.
  • Elderberry a general insecticide, the leaves encourage compost fermentation, the flowers and berries make lovely wine!
  • Fennel (not F. vulgare or F.officionale) repels flies, fleas and ants.
  • French Marigold root secretions kill nematodes in the soil. Will repel white fly amongst tomatoes.
  • Garlic helps keep aphids away from roses.
  • Hyssop attracts cabbage white moth keeping brassicas free from infestation.
  • Mint repels cabbage white moth. Dried and placed with clothes will repel clothes moth.
  • Nasturtium secrete a mustard oil, which many insects find attractive and will seek out, particularly the cabbage white moth. Alternatively, the flowers repel aphids and the cucumber beetle. The climbing variety grown up apple trees will repel codling moth.
  • Pyrethrum will repel bugs if grown around the vegetable garden.
  • Rosemary repels carrot fly.
  • Rue (Rutus, not Peganum) keeps cats and dogs off garden beds if planted round the borders.
  • Sage protects cabbages from cabbage white moth.
  • Tansy (Tanacetum, not Senecio) repels moths, flies and ants. Plant beneath peach trees to repel harmful flying insects. Tansy leaves assist compost fermentation.
  • Wormwood (Artemesia, not Ambrosia) although it can inhibit the growth of plants near it, wormwood does repel moths, flies and fleas and keeps animals off the garden.
 
Old March 1st, 2009 #3
Maxine Grey
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Try companion planting


Plant
Good Neighbours
How it works
Bad Neighbours
Apple
Nasturtium, Chives
Nasturtium climbs tree and is said to repel codling moth
Potatoes
Apricot
Basil, Tansy, Asparagus
Basil and tansy are said to repel damaging insects

Asparagus
Apricot, Basil, Chives, Comfrey, Lovage, Marjoram, Parsley, Tomatoes
Basil and Parsley are said to improve flavour. Onions and garlic release substances reducing growth.
Garlic, Onions
Balm (Lemon)
Tomatoes
Attracts bees, said to enhance flavour and growth

Basil
Tomatoes
Basil said to repel flies and mosquitoes

Beans (climbing)
Broccoli, Brussel Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Corn, Lettuce, Lovage, Majoram, Parsley

Beetroot, Chives, Garlic, Gladiolus, Onions, Sunflower
Beetroot

Beans (bush), Broccoli, Brussel Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kohl Rabi, Lettuce, Lovage, Marjoram, Onion, Peas, Potato, Spinach, Silverbeet
Bad Neighbours roots release substances reducing growth
Beans (Climbing), Tomato
Borage
Squash, Strawberries, Tomato
Said to deter tomato worm and improve tomato flavour and yield. Said to increase strawberry yield.

Brassicas (Incl: Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower)
Beans, Beetroot, Carrots, Chamomile, Coriander, Cucumber, Dill, Lettuce, Lovage, Marjoram, Marigold (French), Mint, Nasturtium, Pea, Potato, Rosemary, Sage, Tansy, Thyme, Zinnias
Dill attracts a Cabbage White Butterfly controlling wasp. Nasturtium disguises and repels aphids. Sage repels the Cabbage White Butterfly. Zinnias attract ladybirds, which we love! Bad Neighbours roots release substances reducing growth
Garlic, Rue, Strawberry, Tomato
Capsicum, Chilli
Carrots, Onions, Tomato


Carrots
Beans, Chives, Coriander, Cucumber, Leeks, Lettuce, Lovage, Marjoram, Onion, Pea, Radish, Rosemary, Sage, Tomato
Bad Neighbours roots release substances reducing growth
Dill, Celery
Celery
Cabbage, Chives, Dill, Dwarf Beans, Leek, Lovage, Majoram, Onion, Pea, Sage, Spinach, Tomato
Bad Neighbours roots release substances reducing growth
Carrots, Parsnip, Potato
Chamomile
Cabbage, Onion
Deters flies and mosquitoes. Strengthens neighbouring plants

Chives
Apples, Cucumbers, Lettuce, Peas
Prevents Apple Scab. Said to deter aphids
Beans
Cucumber
Basil, Bens, Borage, Broccoli, Brussel Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrot, Cauliflower, Corn, Dill Kohl Rabi, Lettuce, Lovage, Marjoram, Nasturtium, Parsnip, Pea, Radish, Sunflower, Tansy
Bad Neighbours roots release substances reducing growth
Potato, Sage, Strongly Aromatic Herbs
Dill
Brassicas (Incl: Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower)
Dill attracts a Cabbage White Butterfly controlling wasp

Eggplant
Beans, Spinach


Garlic
Apricot, Cherry, Mulberry, Parsnip, Peach, Pear, Raspberry, Rosemary, Rose
Deters aphids, especially from roses and raspberry. Repels Cabbage White Butterfly
Beans, Cabbage, Peas, Strawberry
Kohl Rabi
Beetroot, Onion

Beans, Tomato
Leek
Carrot, Celery, Lovage, Majoram, Onion, Parsnip, Strawberry


Beans, Peas, Parsley
Lettuce
Achillea, Beans, Beetroot, Cabbage, Carrot, Chervil, Coreopsis, Cucumber, Lovage, Marjoram, Marigold (French), Onion, Parsnip, Pea, Radish, Strawberry, Zinnia

Achillea, Coreopsis & Zinnia attract pollinators and offer shade for lettuce
Parsley
Marigolds (French)
Numerous vegetables, including tomato
Kills root knot nematodes and eel worm

Melon
Radish, Sweet Corn


Mint
Cabbage, Tomato
Deters pests such as Cabbage White Butterfly, ants and fleas

Nasturtium
Cabbages, Fruit Trees, Radishes, Zucchini
Flowers repel aphids and codling moth. Cabbage white butterfly is attracted to this plant, and will seek it out over cabbages

Onion
Beetroot, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrot, Chamomile, Leeks, Lettuce, Lovage, Marjoram, Parsley, Parsnip, Silverbeet, Strawberry, Summer Savory, Tomato
Smell of onion said to deter numerous pestsOnions release substances reducing growth of Bad Neighbours
Asparagus, Beans, Gladioli, Peas
Parsley
Asparagus, Sweet Corn, Tomato
Said to improve flavour of asparagus and tomato

Peas
Beans, Beetroot, Brussel Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrot, Cauliflower, Celery, Cucumber, Lettuce, Lovage, Marjoram, Parsnip, Potato, Radish, Sage, Squash, Sweet Corn
Bad Neighbours roots release substances reducing growth. Sweet Corn has traditionally been used as "living stakes" for peas
Chives, Garlic, Onion, Shallots
Potato
Beans, Broccoli, Brussel Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Corn, Eggplant, Horseradish, Lovage, Marjoram, Marigold (French), Nasturtium, Parsnip, Peas, Sweet Alyssum, Sweet Corn, Watermelon
Sweet Alyssum and Marigolds attract beneficials and suppress weedsPotatoes release substances reducing growth of Bad Neighbours. Horseradish should be planted at the corners of the patch
Apple, Celery, Cherry, Cucumber, Pumpkin, Raspberry, Rosemary, Squash, Sunflower, Tomato
Pumpkin
Beans, Cabbage, Eggplant, Peas, Radish, Sweet Corn
Bad Neighbours roots release substances reducing growth
Potato
Radish
Beans, Carrot, Chervil, Cucumber, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Lettuce, Lovage, Marjoram, Nasturtium, Parsnip, Pea, Spinach, Sweet Corn
Radish is said to attract leaf miners from Spinach
Hyssop
Raspberry
 
Old March 1st, 2009 #4
George Witzgall
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my garden is pure clay. so I decided to use my aryan ingenuity to do something about it. I had the local quarry dump ten tons of stone dust in the garden (at $6/ton, the cost was $60 plus $70 for the delivery).

this stone dust was the runoff from the quarry operations, they regarded it as waste, but in actuality it is a good sandy/silty loam. I built two seives (coarse and fine) and have been tilling the sifted loam into the garden at 3-4 inches. soil feels wonderful (although it is now purply-brown since the stone dust was blue and clay was red).

Note: I also plan on tilling in decayed wood chips and rotten leaves to enrich the soil.
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Old March 1st, 2009 #5
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Really just started planting a small vegetable garden (tomatos/lettuce/carrots/bell peppers/onions & spices) the last couple of years. I was surprised how much actual fun it is to garden. We had a blast sharing fresh produce with family/friends.

We are going to take Kievsky's advice and really go all-out with the garden this year. We're expanding it, as the neighbors also garden, and we're going to share the work/yield from the extra lot. We even have a road-side stand opportunity available to us if the yields are what we expect.

Stuff grows like crazy around here, and I have a friend that works for a local soil/mulching company, so I always get some great soil ferts.

If you have the room, everyone should have at least a small garden. They pay for themselves with just the price of the tomatoes, which are always inexplicably ridiculously high around here.

Like an Irish George Washington, I am now a retired gentleman farmer. (and brewer)

Git cho' plant on, niggaz!
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Last edited by Donnie in Ohio; March 1st, 2009 at 08:33 AM.
 
Old March 1st, 2009 #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George Witzgall View Post
my garden is pure clay. so I decided to use my aryan ingenuity to do something about it. I had the local quarry dump ten tons of stone dust in the garden (at $6/ton, the cost was $60 plus $70 for the delivery).

this stone dust was the runoff from the quarry operations, they regarded it as waste, but in actuality it is a good sandy/silty loam. I built two seives (coarse and fine) and have been tilling the sifted loam into the garden at 3-4 inches. soil feels wonderful (although it is now purply-brown since the stone dust was blue and clay was red).

Note: I also plan on tilling in decayed wood chips and rotten leaves to enrich the soil.
Clay soil here. No problems growing. I did add a couple of bags of garden soil from Ace Hardware every week. But, I still had no problem growing in the clay. Clay tends to hold water more so than other soils and is more dense.

Worms are your friend in the garden. They will aerate the soil.
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Old March 1st, 2009 #7
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Maxine, thanks for those lists! I am going to paste and print those for future reference.

We are buying a new home. Close end of March, so I am not doing anything to present garden plot. I will be planting grass seed so the landlord gets it back the way I found it. New place will have to tilled, etc.
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Old March 1st, 2009 #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donnie in Ohio View Post
Really just started planting a small vegetable garden (tomatos/lettuce/carrots/bell peppers/onions & spices) the last couple of years. I was surprised how much actual fun it is to garden. We had a blast sharing fresh produce with family/friends.
That's a big thing for me. The enjoyment I get out of it. It is the best stress buster I have found and I have tried meditation, etc. Sometimes, its just fun to watch all of the wildlife out there. Praying Mantii(?pl), beetles, etc. The beneficial guys. We also shared a lot of what we grew, canned some and ate fresh daily. Well, well worth it. Good way to connect with the planet if that is what you are in to.

Quote:
We are going to take Kievsky's advice and really go all-out with the garden this year. We're expanding it, as the neighbors also garden, and we're going to share the work/yield from the extra lot. We even have a road-side stand opportunity available to us if the yields are what we expect.
Go for it and congratulations!

Quote:
If you have the room, everyone should have at least a small garden. They pay for themselves with just the price of the tomatoes, which are always inexplicably ridiculously high around here.
I agree with this. You can even grow the tomatoes indoors during off season. Cut a hole in the bottom of a five gal. bucket and you have an instant upside down tomato grower! No need to buy it at high price!
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Old March 2nd, 2009 #9
Jenna Christensen
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Oh i love gardening! I just got started on a herb garden to use with my meals
 
Old March 2nd, 2009 #10
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I am in the process of preparing my planting beds as well.


DTZ, I've found it's unnecessary to till your plot more than once every five years, especially if you tend your garden meticulously,like I do. Once the soil is softened up, you should be able to turn it with a garden spade, or even a hand shovel for many seasons.

Like DTZ, I too employ a roughly 20x25 foot plot.

Though it may sound small, you can indeed reap a bountiful crop, if you maximize your space, and learn all you can about companion planting.

This year I will be harvesting tomatoes (My absolute favorite, and I enjoy growing many different variaties), beans, cabbage, peppers, cucumbers, and squash to name a but few, as well as a very well stocked herb garden.

(Yea mint, catnip, elderberries and thyme!)

Fuck the goddamn kikes and their koser food scam, additives and pretty poisons!

Grow your own food, and live longer! Plus any money you save by growing your own, is money not going into the pockets of greedy, shiftless kikes.

Growing vegetables is almost too easy (if you're White, of course, because then you can actually read gardeining books ) if you have the right information.

Do a soil test before you plant anything. Test kits are cheap and available everywhere. A .7 ph reading is ideal for most vegetables, and herbs.

I would reccomend Rodale's complete gardening manual, or any Rodale books, on this subject.

I believe that while their publishing house is certainly jewish, the authors are not.

There really are some great techniques there, so look into it.

Good luck, and happy harvesting!
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Old March 2nd, 2009 #11
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I am moving end of the month. Buying a new house. I will have a garden there. I should be able to get it in just in time.

I have several gardening books and they made it very, very easy to do. I really didn't have to do much to it once it was planted. Just harvest. Like I said before, it is great relaxation.
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Old March 2nd, 2009 #12
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Well, I wish I didn't have much to do- I'm in the process of finishing the summer garden- only Okra and cucumbers still bearing- and digging out the entrenched root mass of kikikui and giant parramatta grass that has invaded the unused areas.
But on the plus side, the soil is great and the climate sub-tropical. Fellow aussies will know what I mean if I say I have ATSIC soil ( ATSIC was the now-disbanded marxist-run Aboriginal Black racial control agency )...it's black, it's very very rich, and full of worms.
 
Old March 2nd, 2009 #13
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I am going to try growing shitake mushrooms in a friends wood lot. Takes about two years, things should be real bad two years into Bami.
 
Old March 2nd, 2009 #14
Wade Thalweg
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Check out

http://rareseeds.com/

I grew their Cream of Saskatchewan

WATERMELON (Citrullus vulgaris) 25-35 seeds per packet. We're #1 in heirloom watermelons–check our selection! Thrives in summer heat. A long-standing crop in the South, where it was originally transported by slaves from Africa. Sow the seed one-half inch deep outdoors after frost-season is over and soil is warm. Soil should be rich and well-amended with compost or manure. Sow the seed 6 inches to one foot apart, in rows 6-8 feet apart. Or sow in hills 6-8 feet apart, 5 seeds per hill, and thin to the best three plants. Where summers are short or cool, try "icebox" (very small) types; or try any variety that comes from cooler, northerly climates. May be started indoors from seed no more than 2-3 weeks prior to setting-out date, and never let watermelon seedlings become root-bound in their pots. Watermelon is probably ripe when the light patch on the underside has changed to pale yellow, and the tendril immediately opposite the stem from the fruit has withered.

Attention, Watermelon Farmers: Due to Watermelon Fruit Blotch, growers who want watermelon seed in quantities over 1 oz (per variety) must sign and return a waiver before shipment. For information call: 417-924-8917

Cream of Saskatchewan
80 days A beautiful little melon with sweet, tasty, cream-colored flesh! An excellent variety for the North. Fruits around 8-10 lbs each, with a striped, green rind. A favorite of those who grow it! An old heirloom.

Item Code: WM133
$2.50

It was excellent and it had a very thin rind, ie will not ship well. You would never be able to by something like that in the store. Latter this fall I was paging through a book of Ostfront pictures there was a soldat digging into a watermelon that look exactly like it.

An old trick used by the Mennonite Farmers in Russia was to boil down watermelons for the sugar and use it to make bread. Like I say sugar may be too expensive for us if we have to buy it over seas and we need to save our ZOG Bucks for Whipping.
 
Old March 3rd, 2009 #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deathtozog View Post
I am moving end of the month. Buying a new house. I will have a garden there. I should be able to get it in just in time.

I have several gardening books and they made it very, very easy to do. I really didn't have to do much to it once it was planted. Just harvest. Like I said before, it is great relaxation.
Good luck and how big a land block will be your next house?

Don't forget put some fruit trees in too.

I have chickens and a duck to keep most pest out and free pooh too.

The chickens turn the soil when it is in rest.

My garden is a Premaculture one. So no waste what so ever.
 
Old March 3rd, 2009 #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maxine Grey View Post
Good luck and how big a land block will be your next house?

Don't forget put some fruit trees in too.

I have chickens and a duck to keep most pest out and free pooh too.

The chickens turn the soil when it is in rest.

My garden is a Premaculture one. So no waste what so ever.
The only area I find usable (southern exposure) is about 65' by 65', so I have plenty of room. I am still going to keep doing wide row planting to get more in. So, I should be able to add even more things in.

Apples are an industry (uh, well, before China dumped their juice apples in the US) here, so they are a suitable tree. Can't do oranges, etc, though. Too cold in the winter.

I have room for chickens. I will pass on a rooster, though, for my neighbors' sake.

I will have to look up premaculture. I am not familiar with it unless you have some info you can post on it?
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Old March 4th, 2009 #17
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I will start a new thread on it
 
Old March 28th, 2009 #18
George Witzgall
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today I put in my peas and potatoes, onions, beets, turnips, spinach, collards, and lettuce.
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Old March 29th, 2009 #19
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Where are you at, roughly, Witzgall?

It is almost time for me to get planting, but not quite, due to my elevation, etc.

Besides, closing on a house tomorrow. Have to till in a new garden.
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Old March 29th, 2009 #20
George Witzgall
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deathtozog View Post
Where are you at, roughly, Witzgall?

It is almost time for me to get planting, but not quite, due to my elevation, etc.

Besides, closing on a house tomorrow. Have to till in a new garden.
I'm in the DC metro area, zone 7. I put the early spring veggies (spinach, peas, etc..) out in raised beds with a black paper covering to better absorb and keep in the heat so as to get an early start.

Keep in touch and let me know how your garden comes along. I only just started gardening seriously last year, so I'm still in the learning phase.
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