Vanguard News Network
VNN Media
VNN Digital Library
VNN Reader Mail
VNN Broadcasts

Old March 29th, 2009 #21
Joe_J.
Radio active
 
Joe_J.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Gone to work on the lemming sites against Big Jew.
Posts: 9,439
Blog Entries: 2
Joe_J.
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by George Witzgall View Post
I'm in the DC metro area, zone 7. I put the early spring veggies (spinach, peas, etc..) out in raised beds with a black paper covering to better absorb and keep in the heat so as to get an early start.

Keep in touch and let me know how your garden comes along. I only just started gardening seriously last year, so I'm still in the learning phase.
Metro DC? Well, plant some collards and maybe that's all the niggers will steal

I only asked because of your timing. Yes, it is time for the early Spring veggies, like spinach, radish, etc. Swiss chard is pretty good, too.
__________________
The average kwan is of such low quality that he'd shoot himself if he had any self awareness.
-Joe from Ohio
 
Old April 23rd, 2009 #22
Donnie in Ohio
Switching to glide
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Morrison Hotel
Posts: 9,396
Blog Entries: 11
Donnie in Ohio
Default

Gonna prep the garden this weekend, as the weather is going to be perfect.

I have a friend who has one of those small roto-tillers that we are going to use to till the bed, and I am going to add the initial ferts now.

Won't be able to actually get anything into the garden before the second week in May at the earliest, as frost is still an issue this far North.

Looks like we will be planting:

Tomato (several varieties, beefsteak and cherry, of course, as long with several heirloom strains)

Lettuce (red sail & green sail, bibb)

Potato (fingerling/red)

Bell Pepper (red/green/yellow)

Onions (vidalia/green)

Jalapeno Pepper

Cabbage

Cucumber

Eggplant

Watermelon (2 varieties)

Pumpkin

Will also have a large herb garden. We have more room than we really need, so if anyone has a suggestion for something we should consider growing please let me know.

Also going to plant a few apple trees this spring.
__________________
"When US gets nuked and NEMO is uninhabitable, I will make my way on foot to the gulf and live off red snapper and grapefruit"- Alex Linder
 
Old April 23rd, 2009 #23
TwistedCross
Smart Ass White Boy
 
TwistedCross's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,137
TwistedCross
Default

I dont know how well they grow in your area, but my family loves green beans, zucchini and other squash varieties. Spinach and/or Swiss Chard go over well too.

Maybe some other melons sense you have the room. Musk melon (cantaloupe) honey dew and other sweet melons are always a summer favorite.

Carrots? Corn? Beets?

Again I dont know what your climate will hold, but all these are what I would grow, had I the space and climate.
__________________
'My country is changing all around me. This is not the country that my forefathers built. It must be because those brown-skinned people are coming in and destroying it.' - Mark Potok the racist

VNN: for entertainment purposes only.
 
Old April 23rd, 2009 #24
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,338
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

You could throw in a row of carrots and radishes, if you like them. They grow easily. Strawberries are also nice, altho they take a bit more room. Once they get going, they will spread pretty quickly.
 
Old April 23rd, 2009 #25
Donnie in Ohio
Switching to glide
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Morrison Hotel
Posts: 9,396
Blog Entries: 11
Donnie in Ohio
Default

Carrots. Duh. Of course.

Gonna look into the Swiss chard as well. Never had it in my life.

Everyone grows corn around here, they damn near give it away at the numerous road-side stands which abound out here in the country, (12 ears for a buck) & I just never got the taste for beets.
__________________
"When US gets nuked and NEMO is uninhabitable, I will make my way on foot to the gulf and live off red snapper and grapefruit"- Alex Linder
 
Old April 23rd, 2009 #26
TwistedCross
Smart Ass White Boy
 
TwistedCross's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,137
TwistedCross
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Donnie in Ohio View Post
Carrots. Duh. Of course.

Gonna look into the Swiss chard as well. Never had it in my life.

Everyone grows corn around here, they damn near give it away at the numerous road-side stands which abound out here in the country, (12 ears for a buck) & I just never got the taste for beets.
Try buying a bit in the store before you plant and see if you like it.

Good point about the corn, When its that cheap its better to buy. Maybe you can find something that few others plant to use as trade? Its always nice to have a network.

IMO, the best way to plan what you want to grow is to look at what you eat, give to family and friends or can trade.

As a kid, we had several cherry, plum, apricot and peach trees. There was no way we could eat it all as it was ripe. We made fruit roll ups, jams, jellies, pies... you get the picture. As events like birthdays, holidays or just family get togethers came about during the year, one highlight was having a taste of the garden on the table. From my grandmothers pickled beets, to the kids eating fruit roll ups we didnt waste anything we planted because we didnt like it.
__________________
'My country is changing all around me. This is not the country that my forefathers built. It must be because those brown-skinned people are coming in and destroying it.' - Mark Potok the racist

VNN: for entertainment purposes only.
 
Old May 7th, 2009 #27
Donnie in Ohio
Switching to glide
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Morrison Hotel
Posts: 9,396
Blog Entries: 11
Donnie in Ohio
Default

Supposed to wait until May 15th to avoid any possibility of a frost, but got most of the garden in on Tuesday. I think we have had our last frost.

Perfect weather, there were six of us digging and planting, so it went very quickly and a great time was had by all.

Besides beefsteak, we put in a bunch of very cool looking heirloom tomato varieties we found on sale at Meijers.

The peppers/lettuce/onions/carrots/taters/cukes are in.

There has been a steady soaking rain the past couple of days, which I hope will help to get the garden off to a good start.

On a side note, I saw one of those "Topsy-Turvy" upside-down tomato growers for $15, so I bought one and put a large Cherokee Black tomato plant in it, and filled it with Miracle-Gro potting soil, and hung it off the porch.

I'm very curious to see how well it does.
__________________
"When US gets nuked and NEMO is uninhabitable, I will make my way on foot to the gulf and live off red snapper and grapefruit"- Alex Linder
 
Old May 7th, 2009 #28
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,338
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Donnie in Ohio View Post
Supposed to wait until May 15th to avoid any possibility of a frost, but got most of the garden in on Tuesday. I think we have had our last frost.

Perfect weather, there were six of us digging and planting, so it went very quickly and a great time was had by all.

Besides beefsteak, we put in a bunch of very cool looking heirloom tomato varieties we found on sale at Meijers.

The peppers/lettuce/onions/carrots/taters/cukes are in.

There has been a steady soaking rain the past couple of days, which I hope will help to get the garden off to a good start.

On a side note, I saw one of those "Topsy-Turvy" upside-down tomato growers for $15, so I bought one and put a large Cherokee Black tomato plant in it, and filled it with Miracle-Gro potting soil, and hung it off the porch.

I'm very curious to see how well it does.
Great stuff!

I did a tomato bucket last year and doing two this year. In 08 had a nice grape tomato plant, grew to about four square feet out of a 3.5-gallon bucket. Didn't use any stakes or fence, and it sprawled all over the place.

Doing two buckets this year, oneapiece. with 'Sweet 100' 'hybrid tomato.' These are cherry tomatoes, about 1" sized. The grapes are just a bit small. Going to try a second plant, some kind of bush tomato, once it comes in at the garden store.

Interestingly, the garden guy told me that some varieties of tomato only fruit once. Others fruit til frost. Same with strawberries. I thought all tomatoes just kept going until it got too cold, but not so.
 
Old May 7th, 2009 #29
Donnie in Ohio
Switching to glide
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Morrison Hotel
Posts: 9,396
Blog Entries: 11
Donnie in Ohio
Default

Thought I would list the varieties of heirloom tomatoes we planted:

Black Krim

Yellow Boy

Cherokee Purple

Green Zebra

Mr. Stripey

Red Brandywine

Livingston's Golden Queen

If we get the yields we are hoping for, we have a perfect location for a road-side stand to sell some of our crop.
__________________
"When US gets nuked and NEMO is uninhabitable, I will make my way on foot to the gulf and live off red snapper and grapefruit"- Alex Linder
 
Old May 7th, 2009 #30
Mark
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,219
Default

Anyone have experience adjusting soil pH? I need to go from 7 to 5. What's the easiest and cheapest way?
 
Old May 7th, 2009 #31
Kievsky
Senior Member
 
Kievsky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 4,229
Kievsky
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark View Post
Anyone have experience adjusting soil pH? I need to go from 7 to 5. What's the easiest and cheapest way?
Mark,

7 is neutral. 5 is so acidic that only blueberries and potatoes will be happy. Everything else likes neutral to alkaline, which is 7 to 7.5. Go to your local County "extension" which is the government farm office,buy a soil test envelope, take a soil sample and mail it in in that envelope. You'll get a detailed report back of what to do with your soil.

The ways to get a more alkaline soil is to add lime or wood ashes.

Here's how I prepare my soil-- I take drums from dead clothes dryers, which are like bottomless barrels. I dig down about 4 inches and put the native soil in a large wheelbarrow, a Rubbermaid Agrifab cart I got from Ace Hardware. I killed the cheaper wheelbarrows and had to get something good. I put the dryer drum in the shallow hole, put in horse manure, add in native soil and layer horse manure, light sprinkle of lime (if not blueberries or potatoes) native soil, and so on. Fill the dryer drum, pull it off and I have a mound. Do a row of mounds and then rake them together -- raised beds done.





I have a lot of garden where I did this last year, and this year that soil is really soft and spongy and moist. Real easy to pull weeds out of such loose soil.

I'm not sure if loosening the soil is really necessary for the plants, but it makes it a lot easier for the gardener. I've seen gardeners around here getting plenty of tomatoes and eggplants and peppers out of soil that looks like dried up, cracked pavement. But the weeds that grow in such soil are really hard to pull.

Here's my garden from June of last year:

__________________
Godzilla mit uns!
http://mindweaponsinragnarok.wordpress.com
 
Old May 8th, 2009 #32
Kievsky
Senior Member
 
Kievsky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 4,229
Kievsky
Default

I want to mention something that a lot of us individualistic White men need to understand.

If you don't personally own land, chances are you could make a connection with someone who does. Some older person, or someone who doesn't want to work in the dirt but has some land. Check out "Spin Farming:

http://www.spinfarming.com/

SPIN stands for S-mall P-lot IN-tensive

It also stands for s-mall p-lot in-dividualistic because everyone implements SPIN in a different way. It is highly adaptable and compliments any other growing system. It transfers food production to backyards, front lawns and neighborhood lots and shows how to turn a garden into a significant source of food and/or income. A common denominator between both commercial and home and community-based farming operations, SPIN is both a call-to-good-eating and a call-to-farm.

What is SPIN-Gardening?

SPIN-Gardening™ is a do-it-yourself vegetable food production system that enables you to grow a steady and dependable supply of vegetables that have all the quality of farm-grown and all the convenience of store-bought. It shows you how to adapt the professional sub-acre farming techniques of SPIN-FarmingŪ to your home outdoor space or community garden plot by working part-time or full time, working alone or with family, friends or a like-minded group. All that is required is a modest investment in gear and a radically new understanding of what it means to be a home gardener. Best of all, SPIN-Gardening can be implemented wherever you happen to live!

Who is SPIN-Gardening?

There is no one profile of a SPIN gardener. Some are high-minded and others are plain thinkers. Some are motivated by principles; others by pragmatism. Some seek purposeful exercise while others want lower food bills. What unites them all is a desire to re-identify with the basics in life and create a place for food production within their families, neighborhoods and communities.

How Much Space Does a SPIN Gardener Need?

The typical starting size of a SPIN-Gardening operation is 500 - 1,000 square feet and a productive land base can be assembled from multiple locations. If you don't have a big yard – or any yard – one of the ways to obtain prime backyard cropland is Craigslist! Average going rate is $100 per 1,000 square feet per season, water included.

So Is This a Movement?

A society not only must have its ideals; they must from time to time be re-constituted in a way that sparks our imaginations and guides our strivings. That is what is happening now. Across several countries, at countless sustainability forums, eco-expos and green gabfests, people are coming together to think things through again, make certain re-appropriations, create a new ideal. For many, especially those in cities and towns, this new ideal includes meeting more food needs locally. SPIN can help. While the last few decades have seen many last harvests as cropland was turned into concrete, SPIN is for those who will tend cropland amid concrete. May SPIN-Gardening pave the way for many first harvests...
__________________
Godzilla mit uns!
http://mindweaponsinragnarok.wordpress.com
 
Old May 13th, 2009 #33
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,338
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

Good stuff, guys. I'm insanely jealous of the room you have to grow!

But I have one thing you guys don't...

...a garden guy who is one neckerchief short of being Mr. Furley.



It cracks me up every time I see him how much he looks like Don Knotts. Today I went over to try to get a second tomato plant. He has recommended an Early Girl Bush tomato, which produces larger fruits and is somehow designed for limited spaces. Unfortunately, it's still not in yet. I have my first plant up and running. I feed it miracle gro once a week.
 
Old May 13th, 2009 #34
OTPTT
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 9,896
Default

Over the last couple of days I've been preparing my seeds for sprouting and ultimately planting once it's clear they're going to grow.

Bought some of those small trays (empty) peat moss containers that have 10 compartments per tray. Also bought a bag of organic planting soil\material. Planted 10 different vegetables in each of the 10 trays.

Hot Pepper: Serrano Tampequino
Okra - Jimmy T
Radish - Japanese Minowase Daikon
Pink Tomato - Arkansas Traveler
Tomato - Homestead
Eggplant - Louisiana Long Green
Squash - Crookneck Early Golden
Cucumber - Japanese Long
Brussel Sprouts - Long Island Improved
Broccoli - Calabrese Green Sprouting

On advise from Kievesky I purchased a pack of Southern Medium from http://rareseeds.com They even have forums for those who need help.

I'll post some pics as my plants sprout and (I hope) thrive.

Also bought one of these on Kievesky's recommendation.



http://www.excaliburdehydrator.com/9-Tray-Large-Excalibur-with-26-hour-Timer-3926T-28-37-regular-prod.htm

Once I'm out on the property I'll have at least an acre for my garden. Might clear more land but I'd like to keep it as wooded and private as possible.

Last edited by OTPTT; May 13th, 2009 at 04:49 PM.
 
Old May 13th, 2009 #35
TwistedCross
Smart Ass White Boy
 
TwistedCross's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,137
TwistedCross
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
He has recommended an Early Girl Bush tomato, which produces larger fruits and is somehow designed for limited spaces.
....
Interestingly, the garden guy told me that some varieties of tomato only fruit once. Others fruit til frost. Same with strawberries. I thought all tomatoes just kept going until it got too cold, but not so.
Your Early Girl is one of these types called determinate. All the tomatoes will come at once.

If you would like your harvest spread out so you can enjoy it over a longer period of time, look for indeterminate types.
__________________
'My country is changing all around me. This is not the country that my forefathers built. It must be because those brown-skinned people are coming in and destroying it.' - Mark Potok the racist

VNN: for entertainment purposes only.
 
Old May 13th, 2009 #36
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,338
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TwistedCross View Post
Your Early Girl is one of these types called determinate. All the tomatoes will come at once.

If you would like your harvest spread out so you can enjoy it over a longer period of time, look for indeterminate types.
Ah, thanks. It says that on the little plastic spike, but I didn't know what that meant.

What I want is an indeterminate variety with large fruit. And preferably a sharper taste rather than blander.
 
Old May 14th, 2009 #37
Kievsky
Senior Member
 
Kievsky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 4,229
Kievsky
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
Ah, thanks. It says that on the little plastic spike, but I didn't know what that meant.

What I want is an indeterminate variety with large fruit. And preferably a sharper taste rather than blander.
go for heirloom brandywine, Alex.
http://www.johnnyseeds.com/catalog/s...ubcategory=498

__________________
Godzilla mit uns!
http://mindweaponsinragnarok.wordpress.com
 
Old May 14th, 2009 #38
Donnie in Ohio
Switching to glide
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Morrison Hotel
Posts: 9,396
Blog Entries: 11
Donnie in Ohio
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kievsky View Post

Planted a couple Red Brandywines this season. Never really planted anything but Beefsteak or Cherry before.

We have a total of 19 tomato plants.

All the plants seem to be doing exceptionally well. I think the rain we had the past week really set them in good. The Cherokee Purple in the "Topsy-Turvy" has absolutely doubled in size, so I have high hopes for it as well.

Does anyone save rainwater?
__________________
"When US gets nuked and NEMO is uninhabitable, I will make my way on foot to the gulf and live off red snapper and grapefruit"- Alex Linder
 
Old May 14th, 2009 #39
OTPTT
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 9,896
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Donnie in Ohio View Post
Does anyone save rainwater?
Yes, and when that's not available I use filtered tap water.
 
Old May 14th, 2009 #40
Antiochus Epiphanes
Ἀντίοχος Ἐπιφανὴς
 
Antiochus Epiphanes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: flyover
Posts: 13,175
Antiochus Epiphanes
Default

i laid in some asparagus last year. it sprouted this year but weakly, I need to boost the yield somehow.

I have perennial chive, strawberry, and green onion going like crazy now. I thought my dog dug up my whole garlic patch but he must have missed twelve cloves because they're sprouting well now.

I got some tomato seedlings going with the kids then somebody stuck em in a dark spot and they all wilted. I will just go buy some starts from the hardware, which works fine and is well worth the buck each I pay.

I live between engineers in suburbs and both guys plant crazy successful gardens compared to my piddling beds. Oh well, better than nothing eh-
 
Reply

Tags
#1, gardening, neo-amish movement

Share


Thread
Display Modes


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:27 AM.
Page generated in 0.19199 seconds.