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Old May 17th, 2009 #61
odin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kievsky View Post
3. Qigong and yoga will keep your joints lubricated. Free qigong instruction video on the Internet
http://www.fdm40.net/en-video/ipod/ExeInstr7.mp4 Free yoga video on the Internet:
http://yoga.org.nz/movieclips/highqu...uality1500.wmv
I do both of these regularly, especially in gardening season.
How do I convert these files to something other than .mp4? I'm only getting audio now.
 
Old May 18th, 2009 #62
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Originally Posted by Kievsky View Post
DTZ,

Yoga is completely on topic in an organic farming thread.

Be sure to do the falundafa.org Falun Gong exercises before the yoga. The standing qigong exercises loosen up the joints so you can do the yoga stretches with more ease and mobility.

Ever notice how many "workers compensation" claims come out of manual labor jobs? Most of those people aren't faking. Manual labor will wreck a person's body if they don't do yoga. Repetitive strain will get anybody.

If you do 10 hours a week or more of manual labor on a regular basis, you have to do yoga to sustain your body, just as you have to change the oil in your car.

Human life on earth, excepting this period in history with our fossil fuel inheritance, requires significant amounts of manual labor.

Thus I see qigong/yoga as a necessary hygienic practice, like bathing and brushing and flossing, especially for manual laborers. Manual laborers should be valued and to some degree "pampered" with careful diet and exercise regimes so that they don't end up on worker's compensation. It would be a hell of a lot cheaper to accomodate manual laborers with health monitoring and exercise regimes, than to pay them worker's comp for life. If you are a volunteer manual laborer, you need to do this for yourself.
Thanks for the links.

I'm an electrician, so I do manual labor. In fact, I do sort of a specialty, so I end up in all kinds of places. But, my problems didn't start until the RMSF got me one year ago. Lots of people say they have long term issues like I do but I cannot find any research or medical literature on it.

I will give the yoga a try.
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Old May 18th, 2009 #63
Kievsky
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Originally Posted by odin View Post
How do I convert these files to something other than .mp4? I'm only getting audio now.
The yoga one should be a .wmv file. Here's the wmv file for the qigong:

http://media1.minghui.org/media/dafa...Succession.wmv
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Old May 19th, 2009 #64
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Ended up adding a second tomato plant, a 'Big Boy' - 1-2 lb fruit, to go with the smaller ones on the first plant. This variety takes 78 days to mature.
 
Old May 19th, 2009 #65
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Ended up adding a second tomato plant, a 'Big Boy' - 1-2 lb fruit, to go with the smaller ones on the first plant. This variety takes 78 days to mature.
Glad to hear about it Alex! You are leading by example.
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Old May 19th, 2009 #66
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Big Boy Tomatoes are better on sandwiches and burgers, they tend to fall apart in a salad or any other dish. Cherry Tomatoes are better for that.
Tomato soup is my favorite. It's great on slow-cooking crock-pot roasts.
What can I say, I'm a tomato-philiac.
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Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
Ended up adding a second tomato plant, a 'Big Boy' - 1-2 lb fruit, to go with the smaller ones on the first plant. This variety takes 78 days to mature.
 
Old May 20th, 2009 #67
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Dodged the damn late frost.

We put sheets out covering everything. They were damp in the morning, but I don't actually think there was a frost as forecasted. Better safe than sorry, right?

At any rate, the garden is really doing well.

The heirloom tomatoes we planted have all shown surprisingly fast and hardy growth for only being in the ground for a short while. The peppers are doing nicely (12 plants), and everything else seems green, growing and happy.

I think the 48 hours of soaking rain we had just after planting had a lot to do with our good start.

I've done a meticulous weeding of the garden every single morning with one of those three-pronged tools I picked up at Lowes. I'm in decent shape (for 46) and I can tell you that digging weeds for an hour or so is a very effective aerobic workout.

Been watering (Miracle-Gro once a week) every night after the sun starts to set. It's all quite bucolic.

I've always heard that an abundance of worms is the hallmark of "good soil". If that is indeed true, (Kievsky? ) we have very good soil.

As for my "Topsy-Turvy" experiment, that thing is growing like...Well, like a weed.

The Cherokee purple tomato plant in it has far outpaced everything else, and already has 5 tiny tomatoes, with many more flowering sites. Too early to tell for certain, but it looks like the thing works very well.
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Last edited by Donnie in Ohio; May 20th, 2009 at 07:26 AM.
 
Old May 20th, 2009 #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George Witzgall View Post
who needs that expensive stuff. I manufacture a liter of "Miracle-Gro" every day, and it's free! I got a bottle by my toilet, I apply it every night so no one knows but me!! don't tell anyone.

Are you saying you piss on your parsley, George?

A sincere WTF?, dude.
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Old May 20th, 2009 #69
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Default best hoe for weeding

In my opinion is the stirrup hoe, aka scuffle hoe.



You can't weed close in areas with it, but it scrapes new weeds off the top very efficiently. It cuts them just below ground level, so they die, but you don't dig in deep or move around too much dirt, so you don't disturb the roots of nearby desired plants. Also, it's good to leave the dead weeds in place to act as mulch.
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Old May 20th, 2009 #70
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Originally Posted by Kievsky View Post
In my opinion is the stirrup hoe, aka scuffle hoe.



You can't weed close in areas with it, but it scrapes new weeds off the top very efficiently. It cuts them just below ground level, so they die, but you don't dig in deep or move around too much dirt, so you don't disturb the roots of nearby desired plants. Also, it's good to leave the dead weeds in place to act as mulch.

Did not know that. Thanks.
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Old May 22nd, 2009 #71
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Originally Posted by Donnie in Ohio View Post
Are you saying you piss on your parsley, George?

A sincere WTF?, dude.
haha yeah, I started a few weeks ago, but I haven't really had the time to be consistent with it.

see, I had a real problem with weeds in my garden last year, so this year I got several truckfuls of chipped wood and spread it over my garden to a couple inches.

the only problem is as the wood decomposes it takes nitrogen from the soil. so I applied nitrogen-rich chemical fertilizer overtop the mulch. then I put in my plants.

for greens and beans, actually, I made raised beds in the early spring and I just put the mulch between the rows.

but for the tomatoes, squash, eggpolants, and peppers I have been digging holes in the mulch bed and putting them in.

a few weeks ago I read about using urine, first to speed decomposition of compost, but also as a fertilizer. however, you have to use it immediately (the same day you produce it) or it changes chemically and is no longer good for the plants, plus it smells horrible. (I once left the urine for a few days, and when I applied it it stank up the garden.)

basically, you just mix 1 part (fresh!) urine with two parts water, and pour it around the base of the plants, making sure none of it gets on the leaves or stems since it can burn the plants.

you can't really use it for greens or parsley since you can't get close enough to the base of the plant, but for the other plants it works fine. fresh urine is sterile (you can even drink it in a pinch), but again you have to apply it immediately.

interestingly, you can use old urine (which has a lot of ammonia in it I think) to pour on top of compost heaps to speed decomposition. however, I don't want to keep bottles of urine around because someone might notice. also, I don't really compost that much, and I wouldn't do it anyway because of the smell.
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Old May 22nd, 2009 #72
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Originally Posted by George Witzgall View Post
interestingly, you can use old urine (which has a lot of ammonia in it I think) to pour on top of compost heaps to speed decomposition. however, I don't want to keep bottles of urine around because someone might notice. also, I don't really compost that much, and I wouldn't do it anyway because of the smell.
Good thinking, what I mean is a couple bottles of urine on the nightstand next to the caged gerbils and butt plug collection might look a tad suspicious and give the impression of impropriety.
 
Old May 22nd, 2009 #73
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Glad to hear about it Alex! You are leading by example.
No, you are the garden leader. I am a humble tomato bucketeer.
 
Old May 22nd, 2009 #74
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Alex, they tell me that the German black tomatoes have twice the flavor and juice as the regular varieties.

I planted some Russian Black Krim tomatoes, so we'll see if there is any truth to it.

People used to believe that tomatoes were poisonous until more recent times.
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Old May 22nd, 2009 #75
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Alex, they tell me that the German black tomatoes have twice the flavor and juice as the regular varieties.

I planted some Russian Black Krim tomatoes, so we'll see if there is any truth to it.

People used to believe that tomatoes were poisonous until more recent times.
Let us know. There seem to be a million varieties of tomato.
 
Old May 22nd, 2009 #76
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http://urbanext.illinois.edu/veggies/tomato1.html

^^^^
Lots of tomato variety information!!!



Blugh, although I hate tomatoes(especially the texture) I do love sun dried tomatoes that have been basking in spices and olive oil.
 
Old June 3rd, 2009 #77
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Thought I would list the varieties of heirloom tomatoes we planted:

Black Krim

Yellow Boy

Cherokee Purple

Green Zebra

Mr. Stripey

Red Brandywine

Livingston's Golden Queen

If we get the yields we are hoping for, we have a perfect location for a road-side stand to sell some of our crop.
Well, it looks as if we are going to do the road-side stand venture with the neighbors across the road this summer.

Should be a lot of fun, and from what I have been told about the history of selling fresh produce at this location, can be quite financially rewarding as well.

Going to focus on offering a wide variety of heirloom tomatoes, bell peppers, green onions, leaf lettuce and fresh spices. Potatoes, carrots and the big Bermuda onions as they come in.

We have added the following heirloom tomatoes from well-established plants bought at a local greenhouse (paid between 3 and 5 bucks for each plant):

Moonglow

Garden Peach

Red Stripe

Chocolate Stripe

Heartland Beefsteak

Japanese Black Cherry

4th Of July

Abe Lincoln

Also put in more peppers ('California Giant' red & green), onions (green & Bermuda) from plants and more carrots ('Danvers half-long') from seed.

Going to expand the spice garden as well.

We have access to 100+ acres of land, so we are really only limited by the amount of work we want to put into it.

Being retired at 46 can be boring, and I am stoked about the challenge of making the venture a success.
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Old June 3rd, 2009 #78
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Originally Posted by Donnie in Ohio View Post
Well, it looks as if we are going to do the road-side stand venture with the neighbors across the road this summer.

Should be a lot of fun, and from what I have been told about the history of selling fresh produce at this location, can be quite financially rewarding as well.

Going to focus on offering a wide variety of heirloom tomatoes, bell peppers, green onions, leaf lettuce and fresh spices. Potatoes, carrots and the big Bermuda onions as they come in.

We have added the following heirloom tomatoes from well-established plants bought at a local greenhouse (paid between 3 and 5 bucks for each plant):

Moonglow

Garden Peach

Red Stripe

Chocolate Stripe

Heartland Beefsteak

Japanese Black Cherry

4th Of July

Abe Lincoln

Also put in more peppers ('California Giant' red & green), onions (green & Bermuda) from plants and more carrots ('Danvers half-long') from seed.

Going to expand the spice garden as well.

We have access to 100+ acres of land, so we are really only limited by the amount of work we want to put into it.

Being retired at 46 can be boring, and I am stoked about the challenge of making the venture a success.
If you want to do a commercial farm/nursery/ Internet herbal supply business, you need a dump truck (to get horse manure), a rototiller with a furrowing/hilling attachment, and a large greenhouse. If you have access to 100 acres and you are retired, you should go for it. Become a farmer and garden supply business.

Basically you become the local expert by doing, and sell your vegetables and get your tax break. Make sure you actually hire an accountant to keep your books for you so you comply with the law while avoiding tax overpayment. Farming is a great legal tax shelter!

In the greenhouse you can grow and process herbs. Learn all the medicinal herbs, and how to make tinctures and potions and the like. Basically what they used to call an apothecary.'

Lastly, you can help people in your area get gardens going. You can deliver horse manure with your dump truck, and sell them seedling starts that you grow in your greenhouse, and if you want to get even more involved you can do a rototilling service but make them get a "dig safe" property inspection where the utility guys come and plant flags wherever there are underground lines.

Whatever heirloom tomatoes come out really good, please save the seeds and PM me. I'll send you an SASE to send me some of your tomato seeds. Heirlooms only of course.

Also, plant some Asian pear and fingerling potatoes. They taste very good and sell for a lot of money at the markets. Also, join your state's organic farming association. Maybe become one of it's officers. You'll meeet the coolest people in your state this way. You might even become an organic farming lobbyist this way.

Still bored? I recommend studying energy work -- qigong, tai chi, yoga. Check out this guy -- this stuff is real:

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Old June 3rd, 2009 #79
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We had a big T-storm yesterday. Twenty minutes of hail about the size of a penny. The tomatoes, potatoes and beans seem okay but everything else looks wiped out.
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Old June 3rd, 2009 #80
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Thanks for the tips, Kievsky. I've spent pretty much all day doing research on what is required for creating just such a business.

Here is where we are at right now:

At present, we have 2 absolutely prime locations from which to sell anything we grow:

The neighbors parents ran a very successful produce stand for 15 years here locally that is located just outside a state park. Tons of traffic. They gave up selling at the location due to ill health a couple of years ago, and it has been idle since then. We are going to re-open it, and sell from that location 4 days a week.

We will have to do some cosmetic rehab on the building, but nothing major. It's nothing more than a large gazebo with a lot of room for parking and setting up tables. Will probably purchase a few shade tents to cover the tables.

Also, and this is very cool... My oldest friend of 40 years owns a business smack in the middle of a local town's "Historic District".

Every weekend from mid-August until the middle of October, there is a huge Farmer's Market held in the town (think Mayberry) with Main St. blocked off and people setting up tables, tents, etc. and selling tons of fresh produce.

The sites from which to sell during the market are expensive and almost impossible to obtain, but since he owns the building, we can simply set up right in front of his shop and be in the middle of the Market. For free.

This first year we are going to plant as many varieties of heirloom tomatoes as we can.

We have about 20 varieties now, but will head to the greenhouse/order online to up that number to 50 or so. We are expanding the garden(s) to accommodate this growth. We plan on harvesting seeds from these, and selling the seedlings next spring. You are more than welcome to as many seeds as you like.

Late this year we will decide just how large a plot of land we will plant, and build a greenhouse.

It's going to be a busy summer/fall for me, and I have a lot of studying to do.
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Last edited by Donnie in Ohio; June 3rd, 2009 at 03:24 PM.
 
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