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Old May 5th, 2017 #1
Alex Linder
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Default US Aid to USSR Via Lend-Lease

https://rbth.com/business/2015/05/08...ase_45879.html
 
Old May 8th, 2017 #2
Ray Allan
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From what I've read, Soviet aviators liked the P-39 and P-63 fighters because of its 37mm cannon, good for taking out tanks. Americans didn't favor the planes so much because they had poor performance at higher altitudes, but was a moot point in ground attack. The Soviets didn't like the Allied tanks supplied to them as much as their own T-34 and KV-1 tanks (The Germans even copied the T-34 design in their own Panther tank). But yes, the most useful vehicles they received were trucks and locomotives. They got millions of cans of Spam, too.
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Old May 9th, 2017 #3
Ray Allan
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Russian video about the P-39 Airacobra.

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Old May 17th, 2017 #4
Alex Him
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Technology is, of course, an important thing, but if the Soviet troops did not put all their efforts on the verge of a breakdown, then there would not be those who needed this technique.




Quote:
Sent on September 3, 1941

PERSONAL MESSAGE FROM PREMIER STALIN
TO THE PRIME MINISTER, Mr CHURCHILL

Please accept my thanks for the promise to sell to the Soviet, Union another 200 fighter aeroplanes in addition to the 200 fighters promised earlier. I have no doubt that Soviet pilots will succeed in mastering them and putting them to use.

I must say, however, that these aircraft, which it appears we shall not be able to use soon and not all at once, but at intervals and in groups, cannot seriously change the situation on the Eastern Front. They cannot do so not merely because of the scale of the war, which necessitates the continuous despatch of large numbers of aircraft, but also, and chiefly, because during the last three weeks the position of the Soviet troops has considerably deteriorated in such vital areas as the Ukraine and Leningrad.

The fact is that the relative stabilisation of the front, achieved some three weeks ago, has been upset in recent weeks by the arrival of 30-34 fresh German infantry divisions and enormous numbers of tanks and aircraft at the Eastern Front, and also by the activisation of 20 Finnish and 26 Roumanian divisions. The Germans look on the threat in the West as a bluff, so they are moving all their forces from the West to the East with impunity, knowing that there is no second front in the West nor is there likely to be one. They think it perfectly possible that they will be able to beat their enemies one at a time— first the Russians and then the British.

As a result we have lost more than half the Ukraine and, what is more, the enemy is now at the gates of Leningrad.

These circumstances have led to our loss of the Krivoi Rog iron ore area and a number of iron and steel works in the Ukraine, to the evacuation by us of an aluminium plant on the Dnieper and another in Tikhvin, a motor plant and two aircraft plants in the Ukraine and two motor and two aircraft plants in Leningrad, which cannot begin production on their new sites before seven or eight months.

This has resulted in a lessening of our defence capacity and has confronted the Soviet Union with mortal danger.

Here it is pertinent to ask—what is the way out of this more than unfavourable situation.

I think the only way is to open a second front this year somewhere in the Balkans or in France, one that would divert 30-40 German divisions from the Eastern Front, and simultaneously to supply the Soviet Union with 30,000 tons of aluminium by the beginning of October and a minimum monthly aid of 400 aeroplanes and 500 tanks (of small or medium size).

Without these two kinds of aid the Soviet Union will be either defeated or weakened to the extent that it will lose for a long time the ability to help its Allies by active operations at the front against Hitlerism.

I realise that this message will cause Your Excellency some vexation. But that cannot be helped. Experience has taught me to face up to reality, no matter how unpleasant it may be,and not to shrink from telling the truth, no matter how unpleasant.

The matter of Iran came off well indeed. Joint operations by the British and Soviet troops settled the issue. And so it will be in the future, as long as our forces operate jointly. But Iran is merely an episode. It is not in Iran, of course, that the outcome of the war will be decided.

The Soviet Union, like Britain, does not want war with Japan. The Soviet Union does not deem it possible to violate treaties, including the treaty of neutrality with Japan. But should Japan violate that treaty and attack the Soviet Union, she will be properly rebuffed by Soviet troops.

In conclusion allow me to thank you for the admiration you have expressed for the operations of the Soviet troops, who are waging a bloody war against Hitler's robber hordes for our common liberation cause.

The text was taken from -
https://www.marxists.org/reference/a...ence/01/41.htm

Last edited by Alex Him; May 17th, 2017 at 01:20 PM.
 
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