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Old August 13th, 2005 #1
Alex Linder
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Default Facts: Homeschooling vs Slaveschooling

http://www.mediasyndicate.com/module...ticle&sid=1464

Homeschooling Can Take a Lot Less Time Than You Think

Home & Family: Parenting Many parents think homeschooling would take too much time. Actually, most home-schooling parents only spend about 3 to four hours a day homeschooling their kids.

The time you will need to teach your children the essentials — reading, writing, and arithmetic — is much less than you think. Let me quote author and former public-school teacher John Gatto from his wonderful book, Dumbing Us Down:

“Were the colonists geniuses? [i.e., why did our colonial forefathers have literacy rates close to 90 percent?]. No, the truth is that reading, writing, and arithmetic only take about 100 hours [italics added] to transmit as long as the audience is eager and willing to learn. . . . Millions of people teach themselves these things. It really isn’t very hard. . .”

To be conservative, let’s assume that because you’re not an experienced teacher it takes you three hundred hours to teach your child these skills with the help of learn-to-read phonics workbooks and computer software. Three hundred hours, divided by the average six-hour public school day, comes out to fifty school days, which is about ten weeks or three months.

Let me emphasize this point — it could take you, or a tutor you pay, as little as three months to teach your child to read, write, and do simple arithmetic. Again, to be even more conservative, most children could learn these skills in one year if you (or a tutor) concentrated your instruction on these basics. Public schools take eight to twelve years of children’s lives, yet they turn out millions of high-school graduates who can barely read their own diploma or multiply 12x15 without a calculator.

David Colfax and his wife Micki were public-school teachers turned ranchers who taught their four sons at home in the 1970s and 1980s, and three of their sons eventually went to Harvard. They co-authored a book titled Homeschooling For Excellence, which describes their home-schooling experience. In their book, they compared the time a child wastes in public school to the time average home-schooling parents need to teach their children the basics. Here’s what they wrote:

“The numbers are straightforward and irrefutable. The child who attends public school typically spends approximately 1100 hours a year there, but only twenty percent of these —220— are spent, as the educators say, ‘on task.’ Nearly 900 hours, or eighty percent, are squandered on what are essentially organizational matters.”

“In contrast, the homeschooled child who spends only two hours per day, seven days a week, year-round, on basics alone, logs over three times as many hours ‘on task’ in a given year than does his public school counterpart. Moreover, unlike the public school child, whose day is largely taken up by non-task activities, the homeschooled child has ample time left each day to take part in other activities — athletics, art, history, etc...”

So, according to the authors, if home-schooled children study for only two hours a day, year round, they will get three times more educational hours on academic basics like reading, writing, and arithmetic than public-school students get.

Not only does teaching your child the basics at home take far less time than you thought, but teaching these skills is even easier today because parents now have all the educational resources available to them that we’ve already noted. Also, bookstores like Barnes and Noble and Borders have whole sections full of books about teaching your child to read, write, and do basic math, as well as books that will interest and challenge young readers.

Once your children learn to read well, the whole world of learning opens to them. They can explore any subject that interests them, and read ever more difficult material by themselves in books or on the computer. For a small subscription fee, your children can study the entire Encyclopedia Britannica on the Internet. They can access almost every major library in the world through the Internet, including the Library of Congress. If your kids love to read and learn, the Internet provides unlimited resources.

Once your children read fluently, you can point them towards your local library or bookstore, supervise their studies, and see where their interests lie. Your job is to introduce your kids to as many different subjects and resources as possible. Have them take art classes at the local YMCA, library, or arts and crafts store. Introduce them to different kinds of music. See if they enjoy a music lesson on the piano, guitar, or drums. Give them classic novels by great authors to read.

Most home-schooling parents spend about three to four hours a day homeschooling their kids. The key point to remember is that you have many options and a vast amount of educational resource material available to help you homeschool your children and quickly teach them the basics. When you take advantage of this material, home-schooling can be fairly easy and take much less time than you think.

Joel Turtel is an education policy analyst, and author of “Public Schools, Public Menace: How Public Schools Lie To Parents and Betray Our Children." Contact Information: Website: http://www.mykidsdeservebetter.com, Email: [email protected], Phone: 718-447-7348. Article Copyrighted © 2005 by Joel Turtel.
 
Old December 27th, 2005 #2
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Default Overlooked potential

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder

“The numbers are straightforward and irrefutable. The child who attends public school typically spends approximately 1100 hours a year there, but only twenty percent of these —220— are spent, as the educators say, ‘on task.’ Nearly 900 hours, or eighty percent, are squandered on what are essentially organizational matters.”
This is an excellent point. The great bulk of time in public school is wasted on overhead. I know this from my own experience that so little time is spent 'on subject'.

The one thing that authors like this always seem to overlook is the fantastic potential for computer driven learning. For rote subjects, such as arithmetic , spelling, grammar, history and geography what could be better than a computer. The computer has infinite patience and can produce endless learning sets in any subject. Even reading can be taught by computer with voice sythesis capability. A computer could be the greatest tool that home schoolers ever have had. Coupled with other learning aids, homeschooling could rocket beyond all conventional classroom instruction.

I don't think that even 1% of this potential has been explored.






'our's are the fingers that tip scales' .......... yiddish
 
Old January 5th, 2006 #3
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My wife is home schooling. The behavior change has been on an upswing ever since.
Kids in school learn how to act like kids because they're surrounded by them all day. Being home schooled they act more mature because they're parents(adults) are with them all day. The peer pressure to act a certain way in order to get along with whatever group they're hanging around with is gone.
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Old January 13th, 2006 #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cracker oftheWhip
My wife is home schooling. The behavior change has been on an upswing ever since.
Kids in school learn how to act like kids because they're surrounded by them all day. Being home schooled they act more mature because they're parents(adults) are with them all day. The peer pressure to act a certain way in order to get along with whatever group they're hanging around with is gone.
Agreed. With homeschooling, gone are the popularity contests, the worry about gangs/drugs in the school. You can concentrate solely on what's important...the knowledge. Take away the pc bias, teach them truth and facts rather than "can't offend anyone" opinions.

Does anyone know of a site that lists homeschooling requirements by state? I know some states require you keep a lesson plan and turn it in. Others leave you entirely to your own devices.
 
Old January 15th, 2006 #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cracker oftheWhip
My wife is home schooling. The behavior change has been on an upswing ever since.
For centuries, children didn't attend a school, they learned at home next to the loom and the anvil. The institutional school worked marginally well, before a PC agenda was forced on the students and teachers ( prior to integration, also ).

Now, with the advent of computers and satellites, the potential for home schooled children is virtually unlimitted. This is an area that needs to be expanded as much as possible. There is also a potential for 'micro schools' where a couple of home schooling parents take a dozen or so children and have them learn cooperatively. If the students were all white, the synergistic boost to learning would be very significant.
 
Old February 2nd, 2006 #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dianedeutsch
...
Does anyone know of a site that lists homeschooling requirements by state? I know some states require you keep a lesson plan and turn it in. Others leave you entirely to your own devices.
This site covers that question quite well.
http://www.hslda.org/laws/default.asp

Quote:
Originally Posted by Itz_molecular
... There is also a potential for 'micro schools' where a couple of home schooling parents take a dozen or so children and have them learn cooperatively. If the students were all white, the synergistic boost to learning would be very significant.
This is already in place to a degree. The home schoolers work in a support group amongst themselves. The place that supplies the books and other supplies offers classes for subjects that are cost prohibitive for just one or two kids.
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Old November 22nd, 2006 #7
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We don't homeschool the grandkids, but they are in a good rural school that still teaches. I was their preschool, and both went to school far ahead of the other kids. Grandson is in 4th grade and he remains 1 1/2 - 2 years ahead of nearly all of his classmates. My grandson is not gifted. I just spend a lot of time teaching him. I use the summers to accelerate the kids, and I supplement what the school teaches them and debrief them when appropriate. The teacher mentioned Hitler. We had a home discussion of Hitler. Recently the teacher had a unit on plains indians. We had a home discussion on indians, especially the commanche. "Ride The Wind" is an excellent description of how the commanche waged war, and it was written by a decendent of the mixed breed chief Quanah Parker for her masters program. Martin Luther King. Home supplement. Grandson told his second grade classs his real name, how he cheated to get his Doctorate, and how he was a communist. I held the best back for later.

The grandkids attend a good school. The principal loves me and most of the teachers do. However, this morning grandson was telling how he has to work in group projects with slower kids.

There is a black in the class. "He doesn't do anything, grandpa. I have to do all of the writing. I think she just puts us together so we will learn to get along." Pretty astute for a fourth grader. In kindergarten and first grade the same black boy bullied my grandson. I put grandson in Tae Kwon Do. Somewhere around the Blue Belt the black began wanting to be grandson's friend. Now grandson has the highest level Brown Belt, and the black boy accepts him as dominant both academically and physically. It irritates me that my grandson is being held back by slower student, but the boy is learning that he is far advanced to some. He is really irritated that he got an -A because another kid wouldn't do anything and just kept talking. I do believe that the system is creating another National Socialist; the exact opposite of it intention. Funny how people sometimes get the exact opposite of what they seek.
 
Old July 21st, 2008 #8
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No Place Like Home
By Ken Connor
Christian Post Guest Columnist
Jul. 12 2008

When it comes to getting a good education, apparently, there's no place like home.

When homeschooling first came into prominence in the late 1980’s many viewed it with skepticism, but it has proved itself over and over the past two decades.

Whether the average homeschooled student is getting as good an education as the average public school student is no longer a question. The verdict is in. The results of numerous studies show the average homeschooler is receiving a better education than the average public or private school student.

In a 1997 study, Strengths of Their Own, Dr. Brian Ray examined a sample of over 5,402 homeschooled students. On average, they scored 30 to 37 percentile points higher than the average public school student in all subjects.

A separate test done in 1991 by the Home School Legal Defense Association in conjunction with the Psychological Corporation found that a sampling of 5,124 homeschooled students across all grades scored 18 to 28 percentile points higher on the Stanford Achievement Test than the average public school student.

Finally, the 7,858 students who declared themselves to be homeschooled on the 2004 ACT scored an average of 1.7 points higher, on a scale of 1-32, than the national average.

The academic success of homeschooled students is impressive and, no doubt, attributable to the hard work these students put into their education; but the hard work put in by their parents (many of whom do not even hold a bachelor's degree) is equally impressive. Parental involvement is key and appears to outweigh factors such as race and government regulation on one's education at home.

The success of homeschooling is breaking down the cultural barriers that once restricted the efforts of parents to educate their own children. Most people now have a friend or relative who teaches their children at home. The number of homeschoolers in the United States is currently estimated at over 2,000,000 and growing. The reasons parents choose to homeschool are varied, but they generally center on the belief that they can provide their children with a better academic education, a safer environment, or a stronger set of moral values.

One of the most commonly-raised objections to homeschooling is that children who are homeschooled will not have opportunities for socialization. This objection, however, is contradicted by the facts. Homeschooled students tend to be very involved in a myriad of activities (including community service, service in their church, sports programs, and groups such as the Boy Scouts and 4-H). Moreover, studies show that adults who have been homeschooled are more likely to participate in community service, vote, and succeed in college. Dr. Gary Knowles at the University of Michigan polled a sampling of adults who were homeschooled and found that 94% said that their education "prepared them to be independent persons," and 79% said that "it helped them interact with individuals from different levels of society."

Of course, homeschooling is not for everyone. Many parents will not feel that they are able to provide their children with an adequate education at home, and others may not have the financial means to homeschool their children. Additionally, students who are taught by parents without college degrees score significantly lower than those who are taught by one or more parents with a college education, and those in the lowest income brackets score lower than those in the middle class (although the average student in each of these groups scores higher than the national average on standardized tests).

Nevertheless, it is a great testament to the parents of homeschoolers that so many of them are willing to sacrifice their time and treasure to ensure that their children receive a high level of education, a proper sense of civic responsibility, and a sound set of moral values to prepare them for adulthood. America has benefited and will continue to benefit from their hard work and sacrifice.

At the same time, the success of homeschoolers is made possible in large measure because of the freedoms we enjoy in our democratic society. The freedom of parents to teach their children at home (a freedom not granted in many other countries) has produced a smarter, more civic-minded generation of young people.

In a day when many adults define themselves in terms of their "job" or "career," the number of mothers and fathers who are willing to sacrifice both to ensure the quality of their children's education is impressive. Many of these parents will have a more positive impact on our country than a host of the most successful business people and politicians.

Abraham Lincoln reportedly said, "The philosophy of the school room in one generation is the philosophy of government in the next." If that's true, let’s hope that in the future our government will be populated with plenty of homeschool grads.
___________________________________________________

Ken Connor is Chairman of the Center for a Just Society in Washington, DC and a nationally recognized trial lawyer who represented Governor Jeb Bush in the Terri Schiavo case. Connor was formally President of the Family Research Council, Chairman of the Board of CareNet, and Vice Chairman of Americans United for Life. For more articles and resources from Mr. Connor and the Center for a Just Society, go to www.ajustsociety.org. Your feedback is welcome; please email [email protected].

http://www.christianpost.com/article...-like-home.htm
 
Old July 21st, 2008 #9
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Washington Times Op-ed—Homeschooling Pioneers Deserve Thanks for Efforts

by J. Michael Smith
HSLDA President

As America celebrates its 232nd year of freedom as a nation, a revolution within our nation continues to grow. The homeschool movement, which is a rebirth of the primary form of education in early America, continues to advance despite overwhelming odds.

The modern homeschool movement traces its roots to the late ’70s and early ’80s when two main ideas began to revive the method of education our forefathers practiced. First was a belief that the traditional classroom and institutional school, as a whole, was inadequate to meet the individual educational needs of children, and in some cases may actually harm a child’s development.

Two men are credited with giving energy and expression to this idea. John Holt, who was a public education reformer, generally is recognized as the first to begin arguing in writing that children are by nature curious and eager to learn, but schools tend to suppress the natural curiosity of children rather than encouraging it.

Mr. Holt’s efforts to reform public education failed, and his effort to advance his ideas through private schools was met with meager success. He finally concluded that parents who wanted to have their children learn could simply teach the child at home. Mr. Holt summed up his philosophy this way: “I think that learning is not the result of teaching, but of curiosity in the activity of the learner.”

Raymond Moore’s emphasis was on early childhood development and he concluded through his extensive research and studies that children, especially boys, should not be in a formal classroom setting until as late as age 8, and in some cases, age 10. Prior to that time, they should interact at home with their parents. Mr. Moore believed that a child’s interests should be encouraged and fostered by the parent. This led naturally to homeschooling.

The second motivation leading the revolution away from public school attendance and toward homeschooling occurred in the ’60s and ’70s when a series of court cases significantly fueled the homeschool movement. These decisions, such as banning prayer in school, prohibiting the reading of the Bible in the classroom, and mandating evolution to be taught as the only viable theory for exploring life, seriously troubled many parents.

Just as Great Britain chafed at the Colonies’ efforts to gain freedom, the public school establishment and the teachers unions were not pleased with this group’s effort to seek freedom from government control in their children’s education. Many state school officials considered this movement quite rebellious and attempted to squash it through the compulsory school attendance laws every state had adopted after the Civil War.

These laws require a child between certain ages to be in a public school or another educational program that the state approves. Private schools generally are recognized as legitimate alternative schools, but homeschooling was recognized as a legal option in only a handful of states in the early 1980s. Some state laws recognized exceptions from public school attendance if the child was receiving “equivalent instruction elsewhere.” However, these states were reluctant to recognize homeschooling as a legal “equivalent.”

Parents were faced with threats of prosecution and jail for teaching their children at home. They also faced the possibility the state could remove their children from their home for failing to send them to public school.

Despite the potential for these frightening consequences, thousands of families with the pioneer spirit and the conviction that God was calling them to teach their children at home did not yield to the state’s power.

It was this backdrop that prompted the founding in 1983 of the Home School Legal Defense Association, which defends the fundamental right of parents to direct the upbringing and education of their children. Although a struggle, courts reluctantly began finding that this parental choice was protected by the Constitution.

State legislatures one by one then began to recognize the right and value of parents teaching their children at home. More than 30 states in a matter of 10 years passed laws recognizing homeschooling in various forms as a legal exemption from public school attendance.

Just as our founders were courageous in their battle for freedom, so were the homeschool pioneers in their battle for the freedom to homeschool. America owes a great debt of gratitude to the pioneers of the homeschool movement. As we celebrate freedom, HSLDA salutes the thousands of homeschool parents who risked going to jail, and even the loss of their children, to establish this freedom for the hundreds of thousands of homeschool parents today.

Michael Smith is the president of the Home School Legal Defense Association. He may be contacted at (540)338-5600; or send email to [email protected].
 
Old February 6th, 2009 #10
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Default Selected comments about German family moving to Kwa for home schooling

http://www.deutsche-welle.de/dw/arti...005534,00.html

Quote:
...The following comments reflect the views of DW-WORLD.DE readers. Not all reader comments have been published (Any wonder why?)...

...We are a family from Germany now living in New Zealand because we had to leave our country because of homeschooling. Here in New Zealand, homeschooling is quite normal and we have the feeling to live in a free country. In Germany we felt already as persecuted Christians as the German government is not interested in Christian education anymore. We did homeschooling in Germany in a bilingual way so the children had no difficulties to move into an English speaking count...
http://www.deutsche-welle.de/dw/arti...979558,00.html

Quote:
..."The police were knocking at the door, and one day they took the children to school, and the children were crying because the policemen took the schoolbags by force," Uwe Romeike told DW-RADIO. "They were really rude -- especially to my wife."...

..."We noticed that the school books always reflect certain values, that education cannot be neutral," Hannelore Romeike said. "We communicate our values, the teachers communicate theirs, and if the kids are at school, we cannot have an influence on what they learn."...

...The family now hopes that their application for political asylum will be successful and they will be granted permanent residence and work permits in the US...

...Germans who ignore the state's rules about mandatory school education can face hefty fines and even jail sentences...
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Old April 25th, 2009 #11
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[Chronicles comment]

Modern German text for high school and for college are merely multicultural propaganda instruments embedded in “learning German.” Nearly all of the pictures and photos of people in the texts are of non-Germans - black, brown, Muslim and Buddhist - having fun learning German with a few German landmarks in the background. You can go through two years of these expensive texts without gaining any systematic knowledge of the German language. Most modern “text” books are not “text” books; they are picture and photo books which assault the eyes and the senses; they are busy without essence. This includes college texts. Written “knowledge” is added to the margins as if one were reading the Talmud in post-modern context.
 
Old April 25th, 2009 #12
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Such a beautiful Aryan family living off the grid!

The hideous, degenerate Jew's worst nightmare, itz!
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Old April 25th, 2009 #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
In a 1997 study, Strengths of Their Own, Dr. Brian Ray examined a sample of over 5,402 homeschooled students. On average, they scored 30 to 37 percentile points higher than the average public school student in all subjects.

A separate test done in 1991 by the Home School Legal Defense Association in conjunction with the Psychological Corporation found that a sampling of 5,124 homeschooled students across all grades scored 18 to 28 percentile points higher on the Stanford Achievement Test than the average public school student.

Finally, the 7,858 students who declared themselves to be homeschooled on the 2004 ACT scored an average of 1.7 points higher, on a scale of 1-32, than the national average.
Clearly they don't want bright, educated, White children to have the ability to think for themselves, absent the system's own filter, possessing those skills necessary allowing a critical and unbiased examination of reality in all of its forms thus drawing their own conclusions based upon their education and life experience. There can be no other reason for denying a parent the Inalienable Right to have a child educated as he or she sees fit.
 
Old June 8th, 2009 #14
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http://es.geocities.com/sucellus23/920.htm

Troy Southgate on homeschooling, the healthy alternative.
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Old June 19th, 2009 #15
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'Mom, dad better than certified teachers'
Report says it's 'myth' that 'qualifications' help

Posted: June 17, 2009

By Bob Unruh

Not only do a long list of studies show that mom and dad can teach
their own children as effectively as any "certified" teacher, there are indications that for some subjects, those "qualified" instructors actually deliver a negative impact to the performance of their students, according to a new assessment assembled by the Home School Legal Defense Association.

The organization periodically assembles information for its constituency, the hundreds of thousands of families across the United States that teach their own children at home.

This new report by Chris Klicka, senior counsel for the HSLDA, is titled, "The Myth of Teacher Qualifications."

He reported, "Educational research does not indicate any positive correlation between teacher qualifications and student performance. Many courts have found teacher qualification requirements on homeschoolers to be too excessive or not appropriate. The trend in state legislatures across the country indicates an abandonment of teacher qualification requirements for homeschool teachers. In fact, Americans, in general, are realizing that the necessity of teacher qualifications is a myth. The teachers' unions and other members of the educational establishment make up the small minority still lobbying for teacher certification in order to protect their disintegrating monopoly on education."

He said homeschoolers need such information to deal with issues such as that raised in Kansas a few years ago, when the state school board association tried to obtain a law that would have required homeschool teachers to be subject to state certification and licensing requirements.

The assessment reviewed literally dozens of studies that looked into the issue. For example, a 1999 Thomas Fordham Foundation study called "Better Teachers, Better Schools" looked at data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study survey of 24,000 eight-grade students.

Two key questions were whether teachers with "standard" certification outperform teachers with alternative or probationary credentials in terms of student achievement and are different teacher licensure components related to achievement.

In that study, the authors found, "Although teacher certification is pervasive, there is little rigorous evidence that it is systematically related to student achievement. Contrary to conventional wisdom, mathematics and science students who have teachers with emergency credentials do no worse than students whose teachers have standard teaching credentials, all else being equal. This result should, at the very least, cast doubt on assertions that standard certification should be required of all teachers."

According to the HSLDA report, "The study also found that having a degree in education has no impact on student science test scores and, in mathematics, having a B.A. in education actually has a statistically negative impact on scores in math!"

According to the evaluation of studies, "Most education officials publicly claim that teachers need special 'qualifications' in order to be effective. As a result, public education organizations often promote legislation or an interpretation of the law which would require home school parents to have one of three qualifications: 1) a teacher certificate, 2) a college degree, or 3) pass a 'teacher's exam.'"

But, the HSLDA report said, "Although this seems reasonable on the surface, such requirements not only violate the right of parents to teach their children as guaranteed by the First and Fourteenth Amendments, but virtually all academic research documents that there is no positive correlation between teacher qualifications (especially teacher certification requirements) and student performance."

"I have talked," wrote Klicka, "with hundreds of school officials who cannot understand how a 'mere mother' with a high school diploma could possibly teach her own children. These officials literally take offense that parents would try to teach their children and actually think that they will do as well as teachers in the public school who have at least four years and sometimes seven years of higher education.

"Unfortunately, critics in the media have also believed this myth and will question the validity of homeschooling by asking, 'But are the parents qualified?' What is so laughable about this belief in teacher qualifications by public school authorities are the statistics which show the appalling decline in competency among certified public school teachers and the failure of the teacher colleges," he wrote.

The assessment said, "One of the most significant studies in this area was performed by Dr. Eric Hanushek of the University of Rochester, who surveyed the results of 113 studies on the impact of teachers' qualifications on their students' academic achievement. Eighty-five percent of the studies found no positive correlation between the educational performance of the students and the teacher's educational background.

"Although 7 percent of the studies did find a positive correlation, 5 percent found a negative impact," the report said.

Sam Peavey, professor emeritus of the School of Education at the University of Louisville, also concluded: "I wish I could tell you that those thousands of [teacher certification documents] contributed significantly to the quality of children's learning, but I cannot. ... After fifty years of research, we have found no significant correlation between the requirements for teacher certification and the quality of student achievement.

He said the one way to identify a good teacher is to look at the performance of the students.

http://worldnetdaily.com/index.php?f...&pageId=101397
 
Old June 19th, 2009 #16
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I know the education system very well, as I have family members in it, and let me tell you, elementary, junior high and high school are a joke.

The only argument to public school is the socialization, not the education.
 
Old June 19th, 2009 #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassanio View Post
Such a beautiful Aryan family living off the grid!

The hideous, degenerate Jew's worst nightmare, itz!
But these 'beautiful Aryans' are shoveling another type of Jewish crap into the heads of their children, namely that of Christianity.
 
Old June 19th, 2009 #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark View Post
I know the education system very well, as I have family members in it, and let me tell you, elementary, junior high and high school are a joke.

The only argument to public school is the socialization, not the education.
Nope, that fails too. Any measure you want to make, HS are far ahead of PS, and that certainly includes socialization - maturity. It's being around same-age peers all day that turns kids into idiots. Kids of all ages taught in natural setting by relatives and adults will behave like adults.
 
Old June 19th, 2009 #19
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Alex Linder
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Socialization is a rationalization dreamed up by the NEA after being routed on test scores so bad they couldn't keep up pretenses any longer. Socialization is the professional burrocrats' fallback position in their defensive war to keep their excessive pay and freedom compared to people who work for a living.
 
Old June 21st, 2009 #20
Anne
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Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1,760
Anne
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I have my teaching certificate or, as it's also called: "Bachelor of Education". That program was a real joke. I really believe that homeschooling, or private schools, are the only alternatives to the indoctrination day-camps known as public schools.

If you have to send your kids to a publicly funded school, you will have to make a concerted effort to scrutinize the lessons, texts, etc., and be ready to provide supplemental/alternative resources.
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