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Old October 24th, 2010 #21
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Default Swiss archaeologists find 5,000-year-old door



GENEVA (AP) - Archaeologists in the Swiss city of Zurich have unearthed a 5,000-year-old door that may be one of the oldest ever found in Europe.

The ancient poplar wood door is "solid and elegant" with well-preserved hinges and a "remarkable" design for holding the boards together, chief archaeologist Niels Bleicher said Wednesday.

Using tree rings to determine its age, Bleicher believes the door could have been made in the year 3,063 B.C. - around the time that construction on Britain's world famous Stonehenge monument began.

"The door is very remarkable because of the way the planks were held together," Bleicher told The Associated Press.

Archaeologists have found traces of at least five Neolithic villages believed to have existed at the site between 3,700 and 2,500 years B.C., including objects such as a flint dagger from what is now Italy and an elaborate hunting bow. http://www.wbtv.com/Global/story.asp?S=13354415
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Old November 4th, 2010 #22
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Default Celtic artifacts found in Swiss harbor

http://bazonline.ch/basel/stadt/Kelt...story/16409308

...The Harbor has to make way for the campus expansion of Novartis (chemical company). Archeologists attempted to find traces of a Celtic settlement, since 2002, where the "Basel gas plant" now stands. 1000 persons lived in the over 150,000 square meter settlement from 150 B.C. until 80 B.C. ...

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...Der Hafen muss der Campus-Erweiterung von Novartis weichen. Archäologen versuchen seit 2002, Spuren der dortigen als «Basel-Gasfabrik» apostrophierten Kelten-Siedlung zu sichern. In der über 150'000 m2 grossen Siedlung lebten 150 bis 80 vor Christus 500 bis 1000 Menschen...
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Old November 17th, 2010 #23
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First American woman in Europe, taken back home by Vikings
http://www.vnnforum.com/showthread.php?t=119163
 
Old December 28th, 2010 #24
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Researchers: Ancient human remains found in Israel

JERUSALEM (AP) - Israeli archaeologists say they may have found the earliest evidence yet for the existence of modern man.

A Tel Aviv University team excavating a cave in central Israel said Monday they found teeth about 400,000 years old. The earliest Homo sapiens remains found until now are half that old.

Archaeologist Avi Gopher said Monday further research is needed to solidify the claim. If it does, he says, "this changes the whole picture of evolution."

Accepted scientific theory is that Homo sapiens originated in Africa and migrated out.

Sir Paul Mellars, a prehistory expert at Cambridge University, says the find is "important," but it is premature to say the remains are from modern man. He says they are more likely related to man's ancient relatives, the Neanderthals.

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php...show_article=1
 
Old December 28th, 2010 #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
Researchers: Ancient human remains found in Israel

JERUSALEM (AP) - Israeli archaeologists say they may have found the earliest evidence yet for the existence of modern man.

A Tel Aviv University team excavating a cave in central Israel said Monday they found teeth about 400,000 years old. The earliest Homo sapiens remains found until now are half that old.

Archaeologist Avi Gopher said Monday further research is needed to solidify the claim. If it does, he says, "this changes the whole picture of evolution."

Accepted scientific theory is that Homo sapiens originated in Africa and migrated out.

Sir Paul Mellars, a prehistory expert at Cambridge University, says the find is "important," but it is premature to say the remains are from modern man. He says they are more likely related to man's ancient relatives, the Neanderthals.

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php...show_article=1
There was a bit on this on Bloomberg this morning.

The report was presented to imply the specimen was neither African nor European (those specific terms used). The implication would seem to be that it's an Asian ancestor. I took the report to be judeo-propaganda angling kikes up with the Chinese, who are not keen at all on the judeo-political "Out of Africa" nonsense. Kind of like one arm of Izzystan buys up land in Argentina as a hedge. Another arm, kike-ademia, sides up to the Chinese, preemptively.

At least that was my early morning take.
 
Old July 13th, 2012 #28
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Oregon cave discovery sheds new light on American Stone Age

The discovery of 13,000-year-old stone projectiles and fossilized feces indicates the existence of a second founding culture in the Americas, in addition to the Clovis culture, say researchers.

By Jeff Barnard, Associated Press / July 13, 2012


Displayed in the hand of University of Oregon archaeologist Dennis Jenkins are three bases for Western Stemmed projectiles from the Paisley Caves in Oregon. The bases date to some 13,000 years ago.

Stone tools and human DNA from ancient caves in the western U.S. offer new evidence of how some of the first Americans may have spread through the continent from Asia: on two different routes, as shown by two different ways of making the tips of spears.

Archaeologists said Thursday that they have dated broken obsidian spear points from Paisley Caves in Oregon to about 13,200 years ago — as old as much different stone tools from the Clovis culture found in the southeast and interior U.S. And radio-carbon dating of human DNA from coprolites — ancient desiccated human feces — shows people lived in the caves as early as 14,300 years ago.

The dates indicate that the Clovis style of chipping stone was not the mother of Stone Age technology, as others have theorized, and that the two styles were developed independently by different groups, said Dennis Jenkins, an archaeologist with the University of Oregon's Museum of Natural and Cultural History who led the excavations.

Jenkins said the findings suggest those groups may have taken separate routes after crossing the Ice Age land bridge from Asia. Those making western stemmed projectiles may have gone down the coast, while the Clovis people traveled through an ice-free corridor in the interior U.S.

The findings by a team of scientists from the U.S., Britain and Denmark were reported online in the journal Science.

The Clovis culture is named for elegantly chipped stone points found at a site uncovered in 1929 near Clovis, New Mexico. The bases are distinctly concave where they were tied to the wooden shafts of spears or throwing darts for hunting. The style found in Oregon is known as western stemmed projectile points, for their thick bases and their discovery throughout the western U.S.

"The big 'aha!' here, or the primary significance of this is that ... we have demonstrated that these western stemmed tradition points are the same age as Clovis," Jenkins said in a teleconference with reporters. "There is no evidence of Clovis or any precursor to Clovis in the caves currently, and so that suggests that you've got here, at the exact same time, at least two technologies."

Until now, most western stemmed projectiles with accurate dating have been younger than Clovis artifacts, leading to theories the two technologies evolved from a single source. The new evidence goes against that idea. Jenkins said it appears more likely they evolved independently.

But not all experts are convinced.

David Meltzer, professor of prehistory at Southern Methodist University, said the study clearly showed western stemmed projectiles existed at the same time as Clovis. But he was not ready to say the stone points showed separate ancient migrations.

"Points are not people," he said. "Just because two ways of fashioning projectile points are different doesn't mean different populations any more than different groups of people drive Hummers rather than Priuses."

Jenkins and others reported in 2008 that they found coprolites in the Paisley Caves that dated back 14,300 years, the oldest radio-carbon-dated human DNA in North America. The DNA was genetically linked to people from Asia as well as modern Indians.

http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/201...ican-Stone-Age
 
Old September 27th, 2012 #30
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Smile Hate Statue Rediscovered in Germany

This hate statue was carved from a meteorite in Asia and has the hateful Swastika on it.

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Nazi-Acquired Buddha Statue Came From Space
By Stephanie Pappas,
LiveScience Senior Writer
LiveScience.com – Wed, Sep 26, 2012

It sounds like a mash-up of Indiana Jones' plots, but German researchers say a heavy Buddha statue brought to Europe by the Nazis was carved from a meteorite that likely fell 10,000 years ago along the Siberia-Mongolia border.

This space Buddha, also known as "iron man" to the researchers, is of unknown age, though the best estimates date the statue to sometime between the eighth and 10th centuries. The carving depicts a man, probably a Buddhist god, perched with his legs tucked in, holding something in his left hand. On his chest is a Buddhist swastika, a symbol of luck that was later co-opted by the Nazi party of Germany.

"One can speculate whether the swastika symbol on the statue was a potential motivation to displace the 'iron man' meteorite artifact to Germany," the researchers wrote online Sept. 14 in the journal Meteoritics & Planetary Science.

Iron man adventure

The iron man first came to Germany after a 1938-1939 Tibet expedition by zoologist and ethnology Ernst Schäfer, who was sent to the region by the Nazi party to find the roots of Aryan origin. The statue then passed into the hands of a private owner. [Fallen Stars: A Gallery of Famous Meteorites]

Stuttgart University researcher Elmar Bucher and his colleagues first analyzed the statue in 2007, when the owner allowed them to take five miniscule samples of it. In 2009, the team had the opportunity to take larger samples from the inside of the statue, which is less prone to contamination by weathering or human handling than the outside where the initial samples were taken.

They found that the statue is carved from a rare class of space rocks known as ataxite meteorites. These mostly iron meteorites have a high level of nickel. The largest-ever known meteorite, the Hoba meteorite of Namibia, is an ataxite meteorite that may weigh more than 60 tons.

It came from outer space

A chemical analysis of the iron man samples revealed they are a close match for a famous scattering of space rocks from the Siberia and Mongolian border. The Chinga meteorite field holds at least 250 meteorite fragments, most relatively small, though two topping 22 pounds (10 kg) have been found there. Scientists estimate the Chinga meteorite fell 10,000 to 20,000 years ago. The field's first discovery was recorded in 1913, but the statue's existence suggests people were mining the field for artistic materials long before that, Buchner said.

The identity of the carved man is unclear, but the researchers suspect he may be the Buddhist god Vaisravana, also known as Jambhala. Vaisravana is the god of wealth or war, and he is often portrayed holding a lemon (a symbol of wealth) or moneybag in his hand. The iron man holds an unidentified object in his hand. The statue is about 9.5 inches (24 cm) tall and weighs about 23 pounds (10.6 kg).

Many cultures used meteorite iron to make daggers and even jewelry, Buchner and his colleagues wrote, and meteorite worship is common among many ancient cultures. But the Buddha carving is unique. "The Iron Man statue is the only known illustration of a human figure to be carved into a meteorite, which means we have nothing to compare it to when assessing value," Buchner said in a statement. "Its origins alone may value it at $20,000; however, if our estimation of its age is correct and it is nearly a thousand years old it could be invaluable."

Follow Stephanie Pappas on Twitter @sipappas or LiveScience @livescience.

http://news.yahoo.com/nazi-acquired-...172319961.html

Last edited by Donald E. Pauly; September 27th, 2012 at 06:48 PM. Reason: typo
 
Old October 5th, 2012 #31
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In Russia, boy finds intact carcass of 30,000-yr-old woolly mammoth

PTI | Oct 6, 2012, 07.08AM IST

MOSCOW: A neighbourhood adventure has led a 11-year-old Russian boy to discover remains of a 30,000-year-old nearly intact woolly mammoth complete with skin, hair, bones and even reproductive organs. Yevgeny Salinder found the remains of the mammoth on Sopochnaya Karga cape in Russia's northernmost peninsula of Taymyr, the Moscow News reported.

The body which has been named 'Zhenya' after the boy's nickname is that of a male mammoth which died at the age of 15-16, approximately 30,000 years ago. The total weight of the remains is more than 500 kg, and that includes the right half of the body with soft tissue, skin and hair, scull with one ear, a tusk, various bones and even reproductive organs, the Dolgano-Nentsky administration website announced. It is believed to be the second best preserved mammoth discovery and the best mammoth find since 1901, when another mammoth was discovered near Beryozovka River in Yakutia, the paper reported.

Zhenya discovered the body 3 kilometres from Sopkarga polar meteorological station, where he lives with his family. His parents informed scientific experts about the discovery after which the mammoth was taken to Dudinka in a helicopter and put in an ice chamber there. The scientists found that the mammoth had a hump like that of a camel which comprised fat.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/h...w/16694109.cms
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Old October 8th, 2012 #32
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Researchers discover fossil of ancient spider attack

October 08, 2012


Oregon State researchers find fossil of ancient spider attack.

Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered a fossil of an ancient spider attack. According to a university report, this is the only fossil ever found of a spider attack on prey caught in its web.

OSU researchers located the fossil in a piece of amber. The researchers believe that the spider attack likely occurred in the Hukawng Valley of Myanmar in the Early Cretaceous between 97-110 million years ago.

Researchers say that the piece of amber contained the body of a male spider in the same web. Researchers contend that this is the oldest evidence of social behavior in spiders. The majority of spiders lead solitary lives and males are extremely aggressive, jumping at the chance to attack inexperienced species in the same web.

http://www.belljarnews.com/2012/10/0...spider-attack/
 
Old February 24th, 2013 #33
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Scientists Discover Remains of ‘Drowned Continent’ East of Madagascar

http://gawker.com/5986535/scientists...-of-madagascar
 
Old March 10th, 2013 #34
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Ancient Reindeer Hunters Fished Ice Age Lakes



Scientists have unearthed six fishhooks, the oldest of which was made from a 19,000-year-old mammoth tusk.


Hunters of ice age reindeer around 12,300 years ago likely left the fishhooks, along with mammal and fish bones, in an open field in what is now Wustermark, Germany. The fishhooks, which are the oldest found in Europe, suggests humans developed fishing tools earlier than previously thought, probably to catch fast-moving fish that appeared in lakes as the climate warmed.

“These people had strong ideas to use the new resources of this changing environment,” said Robert Sommer, a paleoecologist at the University of Kiel in Germany. The eel, perch and pike that entered lakes are too fast to snag with a harpoon or a spear, Sommer added.

Ice Age Reindeer Hunters Fished Ancient Lakes | Fishhooks | LiveScience
 
Old April 20th, 2013 #37
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Old August 8th, 2013 #38
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Giant Maya Carvings Found in Guatemala


Big Discovery

Archaeologist Anya Shetler cleans an inscription below an ancient stucco frieze recently unearthed in the buried Maya city of Holmul in the Peten region of Guatemala. Sunlight from a tunnel entrance highlights the carved legs of a ruler sitting atop the head of a Maya mountain spirit.

The enormous frieze—which measures 26 feet by nearly 7 feet (8 meters by 2 meters)—depicts human figures in a mythological setting, suggesting these may be deified rulers. It was discovered in July in the buried foundations of a rectangular pyramid in Holmul.

Maya archaeologist Francisco Estrada-Belli and his team were excavating a tunnel left open by looters when they happened upon the frieze. "The looters had come close to it, but they hadn't seen it," Estrada-Belli said.

According to Estrada-Belli, the frieze is one of the best preserved examples of its kind. "It's 95 percent preserved. There's only one corner that's not well preserved because it's too close to the surface, but the rest of it isn't missing any parts," said Estrada-Belli, who is affiliated with Tulane University, Boston University, and the American Museum of Natural History and who is also a National Geographic Explorer. His excavations at Holmul were supported by the National Geographic Society/Waitt Grants Program.

Maya archaeologist Marcello Canuto agreed, calling the frieze "amazingly and beautifully preserved."



This photo mosaic of the recently unearthed Maya frieze in the city of Holmul was digitally stitched together from hundreds of high-resolution photos by team member Alexandre Tokovinine, a Maya epigrapher at Harvard University.

The frieze depicts three human figures wearing elaborate bird headdresses and jade jewelry. They are seated cross-legged over the head of a Maya mountain spirit. A cartouche on their headdresses identifies each of them by name. The central figure's name is the only readable one: Och Chan Yopaat, meaning "the storm god enters the sky."

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...a-archaeology/
 
Old August 15th, 2013 #39
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Dig This: Badger Unearths Medieval Treasure
Aug 15, 2013 11:25 AM ET // by Marc Lallanilla, Assistant Editor, LiveScience



Some archaeologists pore over old maps and manuscripts to make historical discoveries. Others rely on pick axes, trowels and other tools.

But archaeologists in Germany simply turned to badgers, the digging mammals that are the bane of gardeners everywhere. A badger living in the countryside near the town of Stolpe recently uncovered a remarkable site: the 12th-century burial ground of eight people, two of whom were apparently Slavic warlords.

Two sculptors who live in the area had been watching a badger digging a large sett (den). Upon closer examination, they noticed a pelvic bone inside the sett. "We pushed a camera into the badger's sett and took photos by remote control," Hendrikje Ring, one of the sculptors, told Der Spiegel. "We found pieces of jewelry, retrieved them and contacted the authorities." [8 Grisly Archaeological Discoveries]

One warlord was buried with a two-edged sword and a large bronze bowl at his feet, The Local, an English-language news site, reports. "At the time, such bowls were used to wash the hands before eating," archaeologist Felix Biermann of Georg-August University in Göttingen told The Local. "The bowls would be a sign that a man belonged to the upper classes."

The same warrior also wore an elegant bronze belt buckle in the shape of an omega, with the head of a stylized snake at each end. "He was a well-equipped warrior," said Biermann, who is leading the team excavating the site. "Scars and bone breaks show that he had been hit by lances and swords, and had also fallen from a horse."

Another grave held the skeleton of a woman with a coin in her mouth. According to ancient religious beliefs, people were often buried with coins to pay a ferryman to transport them across the river that separated the living world from the realm of the dead.

This badger-assisted archaeological find isn't the first time historical artifacts have been discovered in unusual ways. The Dead Sea Scrolls were found in 1947 by a Bedouin shepherd boy who was searching for a sheep that had strayed from his flock. He threw a rock into a cave and, instead of a bleating lamb, heard the sound of pottery breaking, leading to the scrolls' discovery.

And earlier this month, the buried remains of the residents from Bedlam, Europe's oldest insane asylum, were uncovered during the construction of the Crossrail subway line in London.

The archaeological finding in Germany is significant because it occurred at a place and time of conflict between heathen Slavic tribes and Christians, said Thomas Kersting, an archaeologist at the Brandenburg Department for Monument Protection.

One of the warriors' graves appears to have been robbed of its sword, Kersting explained. "If someone went to this grave and opened it in full view of the local castle and took out the sword, that's a sign that something's not working anymore," Kersting told Der Spiegel. "It highlights the time of upheaval when the rule of the Slavic tribes was coming to an end."

http://news.discovery.com/history/ar...ure-130815.htm
 
Old August 20th, 2013 #40
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14th-century poison ring found near Bulgaria’s Kavarna



Bulgarian archaeologists working on the remains of the medieval fortress on Cape Kaliakra, near the town of Kavarna on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast, have found a well-preserved poison ring, Kavarna city hall said on August 20.

The find is the first of its kind not just at Kaliakra, but anywhere in Bulgaria, the head of the dig, Boni Petrunova, the deputy director of the National Archaeology Institute and Museum in Sofia, said.

Made of bronze, the ring has a small box welded to the bezel and was meant for a male, most likely worn on the little finger, Petrunova said.

The ring was a stand-alone find in the inner city on Cape Kaliakra, in an area that housed the local aristocracy – since 2011, more than 30 items of jewellery, made of gold, have been found there, she said

http://sofiaglobe.com/2013/08/20/14t...arias-kavarna/
 
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