Vanguard News Network
VNN Media
VNN Digital Library
VNN Reader Mail
VNN Broadcasts

Old February 1st, 2014 #1
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,375
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default Tina Fey Thread

[feminists thing she is one, but they're not very observant. she may be on some things, to some extent, but they're not picking up on other things...]

Bossypants’s racial blunders slipping under the radar
Posted on June 9, 2011 by shockrachael

Enthusiastic reviews–both cynical and laudatory–of Tina Fey’s memoir, Bossypants, have come to feminist blogs in droves these past couple months. Many feminist bloggers have been hard at work, criticizing Fey for not committing to any one stance surrounding feminism, defending Fey’s covert, easy-to-swallow brand of feminism, and celebrating Fey’s discussion of gender discrimination in comedy and her comfort with the word “feminist.”

I finally got around to checking out Bossypants for myself, and I really liked Fey’s disclosure of the blatant cases of sexism she’s encountered in the field of comedy, sharing with readers ugly-but-humorous comments from colleagues and anonymous hate mail writers. The stance she gradually establishes as a mild-to-medium feminist throughout the book is what I had expected from someone who feels passionately about fighting gender inequality, but also wants to keep her mainstream fan base.

Overall, I have no reason to complain about Fey’s views on sexism and her relationship to feminism. I’ve been a fan of hers for a while, and several chapters in, I was finding Tina Fey’s memoir to be a funny, feminist book.

This made it all the more disconcerting when I found that inappropriate little one-liners about race kept popping up as I read on.

The first comes when Fey is documenting the fierce, wise, old school character that is her father, Don Fey, whom she admired through her childhood. She recalls that Don Fey used to warn her to put her bicycle in the garage whenever she saw two black kids riding one bike in their Philadelphia neighborhood, and then justifies his assumption: “This wasn’t racism; it was experience. Those kids were coming from West Philly to steal bikes.” She also shares with us this gem of an anecdote:

Don Fey, who is never late for anything, got to the airport just before dawn. As he popped on his sweet lid and walked across the deserted parking lot toward the airport terminal, he saw two black gentlemen approaching from far away. He played it cool to hide his apprehension. He was in New York after all, one of the world’s most dangerous cities if you’re from any other city, and from far away in the dark he couldn’t tell if these guys were airport employees or loiterers.

As they got closer, he noticed they were staring him down. He continued to play it cool. Don Fey had grown up in West Philly, where he lived comfortably as a Caucasian minority. Of course these guys couldn’t know that.

I particularly enjoy that Tina Fey attempts to soften the racist blow by referring to these black men as “gentlemen,” to detract attention from her and her father’s assumption that these men are either working or loitering (couldn’t possibly be that they were picking up a passenger like Don Fey was, or that they were getting on a plane themselves; how in the world could a brother afford a plane ticket?!).

One can see, from the context of these quotes, the vein of racism (yes, racism, NOT “experience”) from which Fey’s thinking originates. She aims to convince us that Don Fey is a wary, street-smart realist, and that his racial profiling of black people is necessary when one lives “comfortably as a Caucasian minority” in a big city. It’s functional racism. Totally excusable, right? Not so much.

Personally, I don’t care if 30 different pairs of black kids rode through the Feys’ neighborhood and stole bikes. This kind of crap contributes to our cultural tendency of associating black people with crime more often than any other race in this country. It’s the 21st century, and I still read and hear people ranting about the “stupid shit the local black people do” all the time, everywhere. White people are not held accountable as a race for the crimes commonly committed by them the way that black people are (statistics considered, it’s likely that the Feys had a white, middle-aged neighborhood pedophile; perhaps if Don Fey were truly wary and not just racist, he would have issued some warnings about getting too close to the extra-friendly, child-loving white guys around town).

Fey makes sure to mention that her father had a fair share of black friends, in some feeble attempt to counterbalance the sweaty palms he got around unfamiliar black people, a tactic that reminded me of my high school girl friends who would say, “I’m not racist or anything–I have loads of black friends–but I wouldn’t date a black guy. I’m just not attracted to them.” Regardless of one’s experiences with people of certain races or ethnicities in the past, these fears, dismissals, and generalizations of black people represent textbook racism.

Does Fey ever redeem herself for her presentation of black people through such a narrow lens? Does she ever attempt to balance it out? No. Actually, Fey goes on to echo my high school gal pals, who thought that they could blame biology for their lack of attraction to people of color. In later chapters, she makes weird comments like that she discovered in college her preference for white guys and that “Being skinny for a while (provided you actually eat food and don’t take pills or smoke to get there) is a perfectly fine pastime. Everyone should try it once, like a super-short haircut or dating a white guy” (and let’s not pretend that the way she addresses skinniness here isn’t horribly problematic, too).

Yikes. Am I missing something here? Because I’m finding this business of trying to convince people to date white guys for a change a little absurd. As if there aren’t plenty of white people in this country who shun the thought of dating outside their race. I would even venture to bet that most of the white people in my life–whether they’re willing to admit it or not–would not date outside their race. Of course, Fey could be aware of this and aiming to make fun of it, but the way she celebrates the white guy above all others in other parts of the book suggests otherwise. People will claim what they will when it comes to rationalizing special racial preferences in their love lives, but I steadfastly believe that the only things that shape racial preferences are the social mores people have accepted or refuted.

Fey’s failures at addressing race in a thoughtful way ultimately drove me to put down the book before finishing it. Not that Fey’s comedic memoir owes us a full assessment of modern racial attitudes, but it justifiably angered me that she put so much energy into condemning forms of social oppression from which she has personally suffered (I use “suffered” in a mostly sarcastic sense, because while she has faced serious sexism, she’s enjoyed the luxuries of being white, thin, conventionally attractive and middle/upper class every day of her life), and then snubbed the issue of racial discrimination in the U.S., as it does not affect her in the same intimate way. She even mentions that she has felt like a second-class citizen before because of her brown hair (!), since blonde hair tends to be worshiped by our culture. She’s got no compassion for those bike-thieving blacks, though, since they clearly earn their position as second-class citizens. Tsk-tsk.


One Response to Bossypants’s racial blunders slipping under the radar

Joy (@Joy2urwrld_) says:
April 21, 2012 at 7:19 am
Thank you for writing this! I thought I was the only one who felt that way. As a black woman, it never ceases to amaze me how many white feminists discuss and lament male privilege, all the while ignoring (or maybe they’re oblivious) white privilege. I didn’t expect any radical notions concerning feminism or race when I picked up the book. I expected an entertaining book sharing Fey’s life experiences and maybe a few life lessons. Unfortunately Fey mentioned race often and it showed me a side of her I would have preferred not to see. I put down the book and never finished it.
Reply

http://rachaelsbrandnewkey.wordpress...der-the-radar/
 
Old February 1st, 2014 #2
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,375
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

A. Linder says:
Your comment is awaiting moderation.
February 2, 2014 at 12:42 am
So blacks don’t steal bikes? Or it’s wrong to mention that they do?

Maybe blacks ought to take responsibility for their behavior, rather than relying on their black privilege – having crybaby leftists and feminists make excuses for it.
Reply
 
Old February 1st, 2014 #3
N.B. Forrest
Senior Member
 
N.B. Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Virginia, CSA
Posts: 11,145
N.B. Forrest
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
A. Linder says:
Your comment is awaiting moderation.
February 2, 2014 at 12:42 am
So blacks don’t steal bikes? Or it’s wrong to mention that they do?

Maybe blacks ought to take responsibility for their behavior, rather than relying on their black privilege – having crybaby leftists and feminists make excuses for it.
Reply
She said she didn't care if "30 pairs of blacks riding one bike" had stolen bikes in Fey's neighborhood; it's acknowledging it that's an outrage.

May that cunt meet a passel o' nigras with a hankerin' to "lay some pipe"....
__________________
"First: Do No Good." - The Hymiecratic Oath

"The man who does not exercise the first law of nature—that of self preservation — is not worthy of living and breathing the breath of life." - John Wesley Hardin
 
Old February 2nd, 2014 #4
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,375
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by N.B. Forrest View Post
She said she didn't care if "30 pairs of blacks riding one bike" had stolen bikes in Fey's neighborhood; it's acknowledging it that's an outrage.

May that cunt meet a passel o' nigras with a hankerin' to "lay some pipe"....
They think Fey is a leftist but it's not that simple. She ended one 30 Rock with a a toast "To White Men." The 'nists will think it's ironic but its faux-ironic if I read it right. She's not a party line type, but the feminists are too dim to pick this up. She's more than capable of self-insight and self-mocking, which pretty much take her away from the true left, even if she supports some of its positions. The minute you're capable of turning the inspection watts on yourself, you pretty much lose the self-righteousness that defines the moral crusaders.

Notice also she is NOT a jew, she's German, Scottish, I think Greek too, maybe. but NOT a jew. Neither is Poehler. Gee, the funniest women out there are NOT jews. Those two and Wiig, who was quite funny in Bridesmaids. Also, the fat one McCarthy, related to Playboy bunny Jenny McCarthy, is Irish, not a jew. Jenny McCarthy now gets loads of attacks for her statements about vaccines.

i like Fey. Her "Mean Girls" is a very funny movie. Oddly enough, the book in question is surprisingly not good. I read most of it and actually stopped, bored. Which is very unusual. Comedians are almost incapable of not being at least somewhat interesting, but the text and the extremely off-putting cover - I don't like Bossypants. Read Jim Breuer's (another NON-JEW comedian) book, read Ron White's book or books, read Jay Mohr's Gasping for Airtime, christ even read Samantha Bee's I know I am but what are you? - all pretty good. Read Carlin's books, they're good. All of them better than Bossypants.

Last edited by Alex Linder; February 2nd, 2014 at 01:40 AM.
 
Old May 14th, 2014 #5
Meg Kafka
Senior Member
 
Meg Kafka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Lake Tahoe
Posts: 1,184
Meg Kafka
Default

I wouldnt be fooled by the intentional "im not politically correct" dialogues.

Thats the new hip. See "The Office". You cant tell me any of those actors or writers are not complete libtards.

As far as being safe in a city, lets not forget these people vote one way and live another. They have bodyguards, limos, and condos.


They dont mix in with the people they say are disenfranchised.
 
Old May 17th, 2014 #6
The Bobster
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Filthydelphia
Posts: 10,095
Default

http://hollowverse.com/tina-fey/

The Fey Effect

Tina Fey is unabashedly liberal. Her show 30 Rock has been called one of the most liberal on air,2 probably because of Alec Baldwin’s over-the-top conservative corporatist character and lines like this from Fey’s character, Liz Lemon:

Quote:
I love America. Just because I think gay dudes should be allowed to adopt kids and we should all have hybrid cars doesn’t mean I don’t love America.3
But regardless of whether you think her show is liberal, you can’t deny that she is–particularly when championing women’s rights. Her book was full of advice for women in the workplace,4 and she is not a fan of the Republican Party’s treatment of women. In response to Republican Todd Akin’s 2012 comment that women could not become pregnant from “legitimate rape,” Fey said,

Quote:
If I have to listen to one more grey-faced man with a 2-dollar haircut explain to me what rape is I’m gonna lose my mind. . . . Mr. Akin, I think you are confusing the phrase “legitimate rape” with the phrase “competitive gymnastics.”5
And then during her acceptance speech after winning the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor, regarding Alaska’s former Republican governor she said,

Quote:
And, you know, politics aside, the success of Sarah Palin and women like her is good for all women–except, of course those who will end up, you know, like, paying for their own rape kit ‘n’ stuff. . . . Unless you’re a gay woman who wants to marry your partner of 20 years. . . . Unless you believe in evolution. You know – actually, I take it back. The whole thing’s a disaster.6
Fey’s spot-on impersonation of Sarah Palin (seriously, check out this video) was potentially so influential during the 2008 presidential election that her influence has been dubbed the “Fey Effect” and explored in academic circles.7 So you could say that Tina Fey is one of the most influential comedians on American politics. What do you think? Did she help make your decision in 2008?
 
Old May 17th, 2014 #7
The Bobster
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Filthydelphia
Posts: 10,095
Default

http://freepatriot.org/2013/10/21/ti...ds-banquet-dc/

Tina Fey Attacks Ted Cruz at Awards Banquet in DC
By Matt Liponoga | October 21, 2013 - 9:44 pm | News

Every year in Washington D.C. an award is handed out to the ‘funniest’ in pop culture. The Mark Twain Prize banquet is typically a non-partisan event where people of the industry gather together to recognize the ‘best.’ Basically where people in the industry tell each other how amazing they are.

Tina Fey can never let a good moment go to waste though. When the opportunity presents itself she must find a way to attack conservatives in D.C.

In 2010, Fey attacked Sarah Palin in saying, “and, you know, politics aside, the success of Sarah Palin and women like her is good for all women — except, of course, those who will end up, you know, like, paying for their own rape kit and stuff. But for everybody else, it’s a win-win — Unless you’re a gay woman who wants to marry your partner of 20 years – whatever. But for most women, the success of conservative women is good for all of us — unless you believe in evolution. You know — actually, I take it back. The whole thing’s a disaster.”

With the recent spotlight on Ted Cruz however during the government shutdown, she turned her attention towards the freshman senator from Texas.

First the night turned political when Carol Burnett, the honoree of the event, made a mainly bi-partisan jab at politicians in saying during her acceptance speech, “This is very encouraging. I mean it was a long time in coming, but I understand because there are so many people funnier than I am, especially here in Washington. With any luck, they’ll soon get voted out, and I’ll still have the Mark Twain Prize.”

Tina Fey, the key presenter, couldn’t leave well enough alone though and turned her blame towards Ted Cruz saying, “Enough politics. We are here tonight to celebrate the First Lady of American Comedy, Ted Cruz.”
 
Reply

Share


Thread
Display Modes


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:04 AM.
Page generated in 0.10090 seconds.