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Old March 12th, 2013 #141
patriot
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One kid could graduate from being home schooled at 16 and open a pizza shop and make $100,000 a year and buy a another pizza shop every couple years and by thirty could retire. While college guy gets out at 22 with $100,000 in debt. Maybe by 30 he'll pay off the debt and start to make some decent money. Meanwhile pizza guy is retired fishing in tournaments and making as much money in tournaments as college boy is making. Yes, college is a scam.
For one thing you should homeschool your kids and graduate them when you want. People don't want to move their kids up in school even though they could do it easily, because of moving ahead of their peers. Homeschooling makes it easier.
 
Old March 12th, 2013 #142
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Originally Posted by Cliff Chambers View Post
I'm going to college at the moment. What a joke. What an absolutely overly-expensive venture. 120k TO GO TO COLLEGE? I'm going to be in debt for the rest of my life. I swear to God, the Jews that run this school are out of hand.
It's not too late to quit. Besides you want to make money go into the food retail busienss. Everyone eats and you can make hundreds of thousands. I mean how stupid can we be. How do you make money? Hint: McDoncald's, Wendy's, Pizza Hut, Applebee's, TGIF, Arby's, Red Lobster, Olive Garden and the list goes on and on.

I mean do you have to go to college to start working in those places and then own one? You buy a business sometime. That business should be food. Then you just serve good food.

Think of the millions of saps that got a job paying minimum wage to finally work up to maybe $18 an hour. Big deal. Then their mentality is I can't quit, because I will lose seniority and money. So they are trapped.

College people the same way. They get into a certain field and can't find work or they might find work 500 miles from home, but they don't want to move.

Then you are stuck with college loans. That must be paid. If you want to be a doctor, lawyer, or dentist you have to go to college, but if you just want to make good money, then you are wasting time.

I mean you waste too much time in regular school. Home schooled people get to go places and do lots of stuff. Eighteen years of school is enough time. They used to quit school when they were 14 to go work like men.

In some countries the kids are working at 5 years old. College is just a delay tactic. Some kids can goof off and tell people they are going to college.
 
Old March 13th, 2013 #143
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You have to understand if they didn't trick us with making us believe we need to waste four more years and a hundred grand for college, then so many people would do things like open restaurants and businesses and then there would be so many more people with money.
I believe they also do it because you will find a job 500 miles away and then you got to move away from home. If you work on the family farm, restaurant or other business the family is together.
So they create many more problems when kids go to college. It gets your kids away from home, because your kid wants to go to college 1,000 miles away and this means this is where they will get into drugs and drinking and all kinds of stupid stuff.
Some people have the idea you got to go to college to make money. Excuse me, but do you need a college degree to open a restaurant, bar, welding shop, carpentry business, cabinet making or pottery? I think these kids go to college for many reasons. One is they don't have to enter the real world and can play for four years and their parents get to write them off for four more years.
College is a total waste and it wouldn't be so bad if it cost $5,000 and you could get a good job inside of a year, but four years is a long time.
If you think that everyone eats and there can never be enough places serving good food and then you can make good money.
So many college jobs are in the city. If you like the country life you won't like the city. Cops, drugs, gangs, and the pollution. Millions of kids have asthma because of the pollution in the cities. In some Chinese cities being in them is like smoking two packs of cigarettes a day and think of raising a child in that pollution.
 
Old March 13th, 2013 #144
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Originally Posted by Mike in Denver View Post
This is a really tough question, and things have changed over the years.

I started college at Texas A & M in the fall of 1963. My first semester cost about $400, and that included room and meals. You read it right -- $400 for tuition, books, room, and meals.

From about that time until, say 2000, anyone with a degree in Engineering, Physics, and Mathematics was guaranteed a life of good employment. Later, you could add Computer Science to the list. I think it was about 1970 or so that Universities began offering degrees in CS.

That's all changed. I have no idea what a semester costs at A & M or elsewhere, but I have a feeling it is a little more that $400. And, even a good technical degree is guarantee of nothing, these days. Then, there is the strange phenomenon of kids paying to get degrees in Communications, Woman's studies, and God knows what. Tens of thousands of dollars for degrees in gibberish.

If I had a kid about college age, I wouldn't know what to do. I'd want my child to earn a degree in Engineering, Physics, or Mathematics, but the cost is immense. And, as I wrote above, these degrees don't guarantee high-paid employment, as they used to.

Enkidu
Just like everything else the Jews have sucked everything out of college. I think you can make more money opening a restaurant and there are many more benefits too. The family can work together. You can't be fired unless you give crappy food and service. You get to socialize and you have freedom to come and go. You get degree and then end up buying a restaurant anyway when you learn you can make more moeny.
 
Old April 27th, 2013 #145
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diversity commissar at Northwestern. no, i'm not kidding - you pay them for this shit. really.
http://vnnforum.com/showthread.php?t=154370
 
Old May 10th, 2013 #146
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Academic Cesspools and Cultural Marxists (Or Do I Repeat Myself?)
Posted by Thomas DiLorenzo on May 9, 2013 07:44 AM

The insightful article by Walter Williams today pinpoints how cultural Marxists have essentially destroyed academic freedom at most American universities while pursuing an agenda of the infantilization of college students. In the old days the Marxists rarely, if ever, debated their intellectual opponents. Instead, they simply resorted to name calling and personal attacks ("Capitalist Tool!!"). After the worldwide collapse of socialism the academic Marxists gave up on the capitalist-working class exploitation story and reinvented themselves by inventing a new class of alleged exploiters: white heterosexual males. All other groups are, by definition, "oppressed" by what they call "white male privilege." The poorest, least educated white redneck living in an old bus down by the river in Mississippi is said to be, by definition, an "oppressor" of Oprah Winfrey, Tiger Woods, all women, gays, lesbians, the transgendered, and all the other mascot groups of the academic left.

Like the old Marxists, the cultural Marxists do not debate their intellectual opponents; they simply call them vile names. As the Walter Williams article pointed out, a potential donor to Bowdoin College was publicly labeled a "racist" by the college president because he suggested that Bowdoin should teach courses about American history and cool it with the obsession with "diversity" (a.k.a. institutionalized discrimination against white heterosexual males) as the sole purpose of higher education. This is why we observe such spectacles as when Walter Block gave a state-of-the-art public lecture at Loyola University Maryland on the economics of discrimination, a field pioneered by Professor Block's Columbia University dissertation advisor, the Nobel laureate Gary Becker, he was libeled by the university president, Brian Linnane, as a racist and a sexist. (Linnane wasn't even at the lecture; it was enough for him to hear that someone had criticized one of the superstitions of academic feminism, that sex discrimination is the one-and-only-cause of male/female wage differences). There are dozens -- probably hundreds -- of other similar examples in academe, which is why it has indeed become an academic cesspool, as Walter Williams describes.
 
Old July 15th, 2013 #147
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Will Your Child Be Taken for This Ride? College in America.

By Gary North

The Tea Party Economist

July 15, 2013

Somewhere, there are hundreds of parents who have sent their children to the University of Illinois in order to get an education. They let them choose sociology as their major. Their children now spend their days repeating the most important phrase for sociology graduates: “Do you want fries with that?”

Today, other parents just like them are repeating this decision. It costs them up to $35,000 a year — and rising. It costs them up to $49,000 a year if they are out-of-state. That is if their children graduate in four years. Some won’t.

The average student in the United States takes 4.7 years to complete her B.A. (About 57% of college graduates these days are women.)

The University of Illinois (Urbana/Champaign) is the premier campus of the tax-funded university system in Illinois. This means that if any taxpayer in Illinois refuses to pay taxes to operate this school, he will be fined, and if he is really recalcitrant, will be arrested, tried, convicted, and sent to prison.

One of the sociology professors at the University of Illinois, is not a full professor. He is an associate professor. He earned his Ph.D. in 1995. It has taken a long time to get to associate professor. He may never make it. But I think he will. He has mastered the specialized language of sociology.

I respect this. I never could learn how to do it. I had graduate-level courses in sociology, but that was under Robert Nisbet. He never mastered the lingo of sociology, either. He got into the field early, before World War II, when you were still allowed — even encouraged — to write in English.

Let me give you an example of a recent academic paper that our U of I sociologist wrote. He is hoping to become a full professor. He therefore still writes academic papers, hoping for a promotion. In the conclusion to one of these papers, which means the final word in which he is making his most important point, we read the following point. Your challenge, should you decide to accept it, is to determine what the paper’s topic was.

In structural terms, what I presented here is another case of strength of weak ties and structural holes arguments. Yet, in the context of mobilization, its theoretical and substantive implications are made more vivid, showing how networks matter and how the micro-macro Mobilization linkages operate (Burt 2000; Diani 2003; Gould 1991; McAdam, Tarrow, and Tilly 2001; White 1992). In accounting for collective action dynamics from a relational point of view, Granovetter (2002: 53) distinguishes three kinds of configuration of social networks and their corresponding potentials. One, fragmented social structures deficient in bridging ties, are likely to find collective action difficult, failing to mobilize politically. Two, those that are densely connected, though amenable to a high level of cooperation, are even less likely to be effectively coordinated from a center. Lastly, in the structures characterized by cluster-and-bridge configuration, the presence of a limited number of actors towards whom most interactions converge greatly facilitates the transformation of an aggregate of largely isolated groups into a connected and coordinated movement network, as it opens up channels of potential communication and mutual recognition (Diani 2003: 118; Simmel 1955). This is where Granovetter (2002) expects to find the greatest potential efficacy for large-scale social phenomena. Revere and Warren found themselves in precisely such a setting, and they acted to couple the decoupled (Breiger 1995: 126-127; White 1992). In mobilizing for the American Revolution, this was the other–and, as I have argued, far more important–ride.

What was topic? Do you know? Are you sure? (Do you care?)

http://www.lewrockwell.com/2013/07/g...for-this-ride/
 
Old July 15th, 2013 #148
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The sociologist might have a shot at becoming a Professor, but his paper probably won't bring him the fame that accrued to Alan Sokal for his "post-modern" nonsense paper, "Transgressing the Boundaries: Towards a Transformative Hermeneutics of Quantum Gravity"
Sokal_affair Sokal_affair

.....................................................
 
Old July 15th, 2013 #149
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Currently I'm supporting all my college grads kids who can't support themselves.They have part time or very low paying jobs; and I wind up paying the rents,car payments,medical insurances and food utility bills each month;not to mention college loans,grad schools,books and tuitions too.Soon when the well runs dry,things may get very ugly.
 
Old July 15th, 2013 #150
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Anyone who has spent time reading and distributing material on "Christian" Zionism has become familiar with certain names, foremost among them, Stephen Sizer and Donald Wagner. Recently, needing to update a URL for an old Wagner article, I came across this (the rebellious student response was admirable):

In These Times
May 14, 2010

An Assault on Academic Freedom?

Students say an evangelical university in Chicago showed a professor the door because of his views on Palestine and the Christian right.
BY Sara Peck

Hundreds of letters began pouring into North Park President David Parkyn's office from students and donors asking why Wagner had been fired.

CHICAGO–As North Park University students returned home for summer break last year, many of them heard a disturbing piece of gossip: Don Wagner, a popular Middle-Eastern studies professor, would be fired the following year–in May 2010–after teaching at the Chicago school for 15 years. Rumors circulated that the decision, made without any student input, was due to his outspoken views on Palestine and Israel.

An activist for Palestinian human rights, Wagner, director of North Park’s Center for Middle Eastern Studies (CMES), was popular with students but controversial within the evangelical Christian university’s larger community. School administrators have cited financial pressures as the reason for Wagner’s departure, but from the beginning many students–and some faculty members–believe his position was eliminated because of his political views.

In a June 2009 e-mail, students learned that CMES, founded by Wagner in 1995, would be absorbed into a “collaboratory” beginning in the fall. The new entity, a one-stop-shop of sorts for North Park’s cultural centers’–including centers for African-American, Korean, Scandinavian and Middle Eastern studies–would employ “faculty fellows,” rather than directors of centers. Wagner, who became a fellow at the “collaboratory” for the 2009-10 academic year and no longer works at the school, declined an interview with In These Times.

Student leaders and faculty members started a petition—which eventually had more than 500 signatures, including some from members of North Park’s board of trustees—to rehire Wagner as an adjunct professor. But on May 18, after negotiations with faculty members, North Park announced that it would not rehire Wagner. Spanish Professor Cherie Meacham helped lead the push to rehire Wagner, and wrote in an e-mail to In These Times that North Park alumni agreed to fund Wagner’s salary, but President David Parkyn and other administrators declined to hire him.

“The faculty and students who have done everything possible over the last year to avoid this outcome are in a state of mourning,” Meachman wrote. “We have lost the presence of a gifted colleague, professor, mentor and friend who in every way epitomizes our best efforts toward being a truly multicultural, urban and Christian campus.”

Parkyn did not respond to requests for a comment on why Wagner was not rehired. An adjunct professor has been contracted to teach Middle Eastern studies, Meacham says. (As of late May there were no Middle Eastern studies classes open for registration for the Fall 2010 semester.)

North Park is the only evangelical Christian university in the United States with a center for Middle Eastern studies; the fact that its director questioned the United States’ alliance with Israel made it all the more unusual. As director, Wagner organized lectures, taught classes and brought one Palestinian student to North Park each year, says Lukas Dahlstrom, a former vice president of North Park’s student association. Wagner’s books include Anxious for Armageddon and Dying in the Land of Promise: Palestine and Palestinian Christianity from Pentecost to 2000.

In a 2003 article titled “The Evangelical-Jewish Alliance,” originally published in the journal The Christian Century and available at Religion-Online.org, Wagner wrote that “[m]uslims and other non-Jewish religious minorities in the U.S. have no standing with the Christian right; indeed, Christian Zionists are openly hostile toward Islam.” He criticized the Christian right for pro-Israel views loosely rooted in scripture.

Students say Wagner has paid for his outspokenness before. Five years ago, he was not awarded tenure, a decision many of his students say was related to his political views. (Parkyn wrote in an e-mail to In These Times that he “was not at North Park during that time and does not have a good handle on the details which surrounded that process.”)

Katie Cavallo, a student of Wagner’s who graduated from North Park this month, decided to challenge Wagner’s impending departure. In May 2009 she created a Facebook group called “Help Keep Don Wagner at North Park!” which quickly grew. Eve Adams, a former student of Wagner’s who is Jewish, wrote on Facebook in support of the academic: “As one of about a dozen Jews who have ever attended North Park, I found myself in distinct disagreement with Dr. Wagner in just about every classroom setting–and I have the utmost respect for him and his opinions.”

Hundreds of letters began pouring into Parkyn’s office from students and donors asking why Wagner had been fired, and why CMES was effectively being dissolved. Throughout the entire process, according to each student interviewed for this article, no one within the administration would say more than that Wagner’s firing was due to “financial” reasons.

Due to the recession’s impact on the university’s endowment and a September 2008 flood that forced costly repairs to several campus buildings, North Park had to make cuts. Ho-Youn Kwon, director or the Korean studies center, was also fired in May 2009 as the school’s vision for the “collaboratory” came together.

But Dahlstrom, who met with Parkyn throughout his four years as a North Park student, challenges the idea that financial problems caused Wagner’s firing. “I don’t see how the process of firing someone, finding [a replacement] and then keeping the program [as part of the “collaboratory”] is a good use of resources,” Dahlstrom says. “The ‘financial’ reason just doesn’t make any sense.”

In recent years, other Chicago-area universities have also sparked controversies about intellectual freedom and academics’ political views.

In 2007, political scientist Norman Finkelstein was denied tenure at Chicago’s DePaul University after a very public battle with university officials and Alan Dershowitz, a Harvard law professor and fervent supporter of Israel. Finkelstein, whose parents survived a Nazi death camp, has accused Jews of using the Holocaust as a tool to gain power and money. Although many DePaul faculty members supported Finkelstein and his department recommended him for tenure, he did not receive it, effectively ending his career at DePaul. Finkelstein said the decision was based on “transparently political grounds” and was an “egregious violation” of intellectual freedom.

In 2005, Northwestern University declined to fire Arthur Butz, a Holocaust denier and tenured electrical engineering professor. Butz was criticized for speaking in support of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmajinedad, saying ” I congratulate him on becoming the first head of state to speak out clearly on these issues [the alleged fabrication of the Holocaust], and regret only that it was not a Western head of state.” Former Northwestern President Henry Bienen called Butz “an embarrassment to Northwestern,” but Butz continued to teach at Northwestern despite faculty protests.

Parkyn denies that Wagner’s views on Palestine had anything to do with his termination. “Dr. Wagner wasn’t “fired”–which would imply a decision based on performance review … rather, a year ago we decided to terminate the position which he held … all based on our need to keep the University’s budget balanced and to appropriate available resources as judiciously as possible,” he wrote to In These Times.

Cavello describes Parkyn as “a politician,” and Dahlstrom criticizes the president for his top-down vision of the school and being “completely out of touch with … students.” Dahlstrom worries that consolidating multicultural programs into the “collaboratory” will harm the school by decreasing its diversity. Parkyn maintains that its creation would not affect availability of Middle Eastern studies classes.

On April 29, students organized a forum to discuss the “collaboratory,” which Parkyn and other administrators attended. Students were angry and many spoke out of turn, asking why Wagner had been fired, according to Dahlstrom. (Cavallo says one forum audience member offered to pay Wagner’s salary to avoid a firing; administrators didn’t respond to the proposal.)

Rebecca Ewing, a former student of Wagner’s who helped organize the forum, says he has invaluable connections to Palestine and scholars of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. “He has a lot of Muslim and Jewish friends who he doesn’t reject, and there aren’t many evangelical academics who walk that path, Ewing says. “He’s a lot more liberal regarding interfaith relations. … He asks a lot of questions.”

In the summer of 2009, Cavallo met with Parkyn, who, she says, was angry with her for mobilizing so many students and concerned about upset donors who had contacted him. Cavallo pled her case, saying, “If you shut down Don Wagner, you shut down the Middle East studies program. Then you shut down the center, which is such an asset to North Park.”

Wagner’s 15-year North Park career is now officially over. For many students, alumni and faculty members, a question mark remains.

This article was updated on May 20 to acknowledge the outcome of faculty-administration negotiations.

Sara Peck, a spring 2010 In These Times editorial intern, is a Northwestern University student studying journalism and political science.
 
Old August 3rd, 2013 #151
Hunter Morrow
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean West View Post
The sociologist might have a shot at becoming a Professor, but his paper probably won't bring him the fame that accrued to Alan Sokal for his "post-modern" nonsense paper, "Transgressing the Boundaries: Towards a Transformative Hermeneutics of Quantum Gravity" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sokal_affair

.....................................................
Other papers have been accepted on the basis of being randomly generated with buzzwords. One such infamous generator, not sure if it has snuck into publication but worth a laugh, is the Noam Chomsky Generator called the "Chomskybot" which will give you a new paragraph of piping hot kike gibberish with each refresh of the page.
Bonus points for actually including what I thought it was, gibberish, into the paragraph.

http://rubberducky.org/cgi-bin/chomsky.pl

Quote:
Presumably, this selectionally introduced contextual feature is not quite equivalent to a stipulation to place the constructions into these various categories. It may be, then, that a subset of English sentences interesting on quite independent grounds is not subject to the levels of acceptability from fairly high (eg (99a)) to virtual gibberish (eg (98d)). To provide a constituent structure for T(Z,K), relational information raises serious doubts about the ultimate standard that determines the accuracy of any proposed grammar. Conversely, the natural general principle that will subsume this case cannot be arbitrary in the extended c-command discussed in connection with (34). On our assumptions, any associated supporting element is necessary to impose an interpretation on irrelevant intervening contexts in selectional rules.
 
Old August 28th, 2013 #152
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How We Were
Before Night Fell

By Fred Reed

August 28, 2013

For military buffs, I´d like to recommend This is What Hell Looks Like, by my friend Stu Steinberg. Stu, a natural and engaging writer, spent two tours in Nam in EOD, Explosive Ordnance Disposal, a job which ought to have its own entry in the DSM IV. It is a (very) dangerous specialty, blowing up mines and booby traps, and seldom mentioned in the literature. His account of a covered-up nerve-gas accident at Dugway in Utah that killed a bazillion sheep is worth the price by itself.

In 1964 Hampden-Sydney College, in Southside Virginia, was fairly typical of American schools and particularly of the small, good Sothern schools of the region: Randolph-Macon College for men in Ashland, co-ed William and Mary in Williamsburg, and Randolph-Macon Women´s College in Lynchburg among others.

H-S, as we called it, was entirely male, both as to students and professors. This had the great advantage that we could concentrate on the job at hand, as for example learning things, instead of pondering the young lovely at the next desk. These latter were available at Longwood State Teachers College (now of course Longwood University), seven miles away.

Hampden-Sydney was not MIT. Average SATs were perhaps 1150 if memory serves. The students were chiefly drawn from the small and pleasant towns of rural Virginia, and would go on to become doctors, attorneys, and businessmen. Yet H-S embodied (and may still) a, by today´s standards, a remarkable philosophy of education, and showed that reasonably but not appallingly bright young can be educated. So did most colleges.

It was then believed that higher education was for the intelligent and the prepared, for no more than the upper twenty percent, perhaps fifteen ore even ten percent of graduates of high school.

At Hampden-Sydney, “Prepared” meant “prepared.” It was assumed that students could read perfectly and knew algebra cold. There were no remedial courses. The idea would have been thought ridiculous if anyone had thought it at all. If you needed remediation, you belonged somewhere else. Colleges were not holding tanks for the mildly retarded.

The purpose of a college, it was then thought was to turn college boys—we were then called “college boys” and “college girls”—into educated young adults. Part of this meant that we should act like adults, which meant as ladies and gentlemen. This concept, currently regarded as odd and even inauthentic, meant deploying good manners when appropriate, not dressing like the contents of an industrial dumpster, and avoiding in mixed company the constant use of sexual reference in words of few letters.

Hampden-Sydney then provided a liberal education, which is simply to say an education, everything else being vocational training. A belief seldom stated but firmly held was that if you didn´t have a reasonable familiarity with literature, history, the arts and sciences and the like, you belonged to a lower order of existence. College should provide the familiarity. The faculty believed that teenagers, which most of us were, didn´t know enough to decide in what education consisted, or what we needed to learn, so there were a great many required courses. These varied between BA and BS programs, but, for example, a student majoring in history took two years each of two languages, one of them ancient (Latin or Greek), surveys of philosophy, art, a math course, and two of the sciences.

The latter were not Football Physics or Chemistry for Cretins. They were the same courses the science majors took.

The students were then all white and so could be graded on their academic performance. Rigor was considerable. I can still read French after two years with Dr. Albert Leduc who, judging by the workload he imposed, we suspected of being a sadist who spent his spare time pulling the wings from flies. Freshman chemistry amounted to P-chem lite, heavy on quantum theory and endless, endless, endless solution of laboratory problems of the sort encountered in the real world. It was hard. A remedial student would not have lasted thirty seconds.

Such was schooling in 1964. Then came the Sixties, which actually started in mid-decade and didn´t have their full effect for some time. But everything changed.

A proletarian egalitarianism emerged across the country, urging that everyone should go to college. A tidal wave of the dim and unready washed onto campuses. To facilitate their entry, admission standards had to be lowered and, to keep them in, academic standards. Colleges, which began calling themselves “universities,” discovered that there was money in these unstudents, and expanded to house more of them. (The students ceased to be college kids and became “men” and “women,” while increasingly acting like children.) To recruit politically desirable black students, affirmative action arose and, when these recruits sank to the bottom, “black studies” were instituted, having no definable standards and teaching nothing. “Women´s Studies” followed, allowing girls who lacked scholarly interests to enjoy indignation without suffering the unaccustomed pangs of thought. These quickly became departments of virtuous hostility to men and whites (for who is more sexist than a feminist, or more racist than a black?)

Since these young generally lacked either the curiosity or acuity for genuine studies, they wanted to be amused. Courses entitled The Transcendentalists of New England or Europe from 1926 were too boring, assuming that the purported students had heard of Transcendentalism or Europe, so they demanded and got The History of the Comic Book in American Culture. Such courses amounted to Remedial Sandbox, but sounded like college courses. It was enough.

These enlarged children were paying for college, or at least their fathers were, and they wanted value for money. That meant grades. Soon everybody was getting As and Bs. What they were not getting was an education but since they didn´t know what one was, they didn´t notice. They called themselves men and women, without behaving as such, but that was close enough. They attended a College-Shaped Place, so they figured they must be going to college, and they got great grades, so they must be learning something.

Those in the Victims Studies departments rejoiced in extended adolescent rebellion against their parents while engaging in disguised indolence, thus joining the historically comic class of the pampered and bored who imagine themselves as being in some vanguard or other.

Thus died American education. A few outposts remained, and remain, but very few. Men and women of my age are the last fully schooled generation. What are we to feel other than contempt for these intellectually bedraggled victims, not of their beloved sexism and racism but of a demented egalitarianism that thinks that pretending that everyone is educated is better than allowing those capable of it to be so. How much sense does this make?

(In possible defense of my alma mater, let me add that I do not know to what extent, if at all, the aforementioned decay has affected H-S. Less than anywhere else would be my guess.)

http://www.lewrockwell.com/2013/08/f...#8232;is-dead/
 
Old September 16th, 2013 #153
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End The College Tuition Extortion Racket—Require Student Loan Give-Backs!


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Higher education in the United States is a gigantic extortion racket. It’s time to do something about it. Colleges and universities should be forced to lower tuition—and to eliminate all outstanding student loans, with student loan give-backs.

Colleges and universities are not "non-profit." They grab as much money as possible from every source, spend every cent and then cry poverty. Tuition at private schools would be about $9,000 per year, not $44,000, at the rate of inflation since 1960.

Tuition is not determined by “costs.” It is determined by revenue. The more money schools have, the more money they spend. In effect, college “loans” make the poorest students indentured servants of colleges.

...
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"I die in the faith of my people. May the German people be aware of its enemies!"
Paul Blobel, SS Officer, 1951, last words prior to being executed
 
Old September 18th, 2013 #154
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If you are in college right now, you will most likely either be unemployed or working a job that only requires a high school degree when you graduate. The truth is that the U.S. economy is not coming anywhere close to producing enough jobs for the hordes of new college graduates that are entering the workforce every year. In 2011, 53 percent of all Americans with a bachelor's degree under the age of 25 were either unemployed or underemployed. Millions upon millions of young college graduates feel like the system has totally failed them. They worked hard in school all their lives, they went into huge amounts of debt in order to get the college education that they were told they "must have" in order to get a good job, but after graduation they found that there were only a handful of good jobs for the huge waves of college graduates that were entering the "real world". All over America, college graduates can be found waiting tables, flipping burgers and working behind the register at retail stores. Unfortunately, the employment picture in America may not be getting much better any time soon.

All over the United States, "middle class jobs" are being replaced by "low income jobs" and young college graduates are being hurt by this transition more than almost anyone else. Massive numbers of young college graduates are now working jobs that do not even require a high school degree. Some of the statistics about young college graduates are absolutely astounding.

I am not going to tell you not to get a university degree, but I am going to say it is not for everyone.

The government is wasting a huge amount of money on mis-educating our young people. About 1 trillion dollars are spent by the government in the USA on education each year.

The educators just want more and more money. Whatever is in their own interest. They are, in a way, like parasites.

Some of them try to make the argument that educating everyone will make everyone earn more money. This is an example of the fallacy of composition- what is true for an individual is not necessarily true of a larger group of individuals. Education is not the solution to lifting people out of poverty.

Only useful education helps create more wealth.

It seems that most forms of education is modern society are not useful, only competitive demonstrations of competency. In this sense then, education does not help create more wealth, but rather, in a way, is a waste of time and resources.

While on the scale of an individual, education leads to a higher personal income, this is not necessarily the case in society. Education often only leads to higher income because the employer would rather give the good paying jobs to those that have more education. So if other people obtain higher educational credentials, it will just mean lower incomes for the people that do not have such credentials.

The phenomena of economic disincentives caused by non-practical over-education in a society is called credentialism.

A society only needs a small portion of individuals to be educated in science, medicine, or advanced mathematics. Trying to teach a greater number of people these specialized areas of knowledge will not benefit society. There are much more productive uses for all that money and labor.
 
Old November 2nd, 2013 #155
Alex Linder
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Here some real good stuff on film school as a scam, waste of money, professional detriment... His advice is you need to write for paying customers, not for idiotic students and interested professors

http://cockeyedcaravan.blogspot.com/...20Confidential
 
Old November 2nd, 2013 #156
Mr A.Anderson
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The Importance of Career and Technical Education

Without a quality Career and technical education system, this nation will not be able to compete in a global marketplace. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics:

18 of the 20 fastest growing occupations within the next decade require Career-technical education.

Former Labor Secretary Robert Reich defines global competitiveness as the nation’s ability to add value to goods and services in an increasingly integrated world economy. Our ability to compete will determine the living standard of our people. Already we are seeing a widening gap between our richest and poorest citizens. The solution, Reich says, is to equip more people with skills through less-than-four-year college programs. Many experts believe that our current education process fails, at least partially, because it forces students of all interests and abilities into college preparatory programs contributing to critical shortages of skilled workers.

The shortage of qualified skilled workers has reached acute proportions in nearly every sector of American industry. Asian, South American and European countries place a much higher cultural and governmental value on the achievement of trade skills. In contrast, the skilled labor pool has become dangerously shallow in the U.S. The shrinkage of a quality skilled labor force in America accelerates the erosion of our manufacturing base and crimps the growth of many companies dependent on technical workers.

Employers increasingly cite deficiencies not only in up-to-date technical skills training of job applicants, but also in the “employability skills” creativity, problem-solving skills, teamwork, leadership, self-esteem and integrity that are indispensable to productivity in today’s workplace.

Career-technical education is too critical to this nation’s future to be a dumping ground for academic underachievers or "problem students." SkillsUSA is one of the leaders in upgrading the perception and the reality of quality in Career-technical education and, ultimately, in American workmanship. SkillsUSA instructors and advisors are people who step out front to make a positive difference in their profession and in the educational experience of their students. Studies show that employers prefer to hire these graduates because they need 20 percent less formal on-the-job training than those without Career education backgrounds. Nearly 50 percent of Career program graduates continue their education. These are students who love what they do, and who embrace life-long learning. The American public needs to understand the need for skilled workers and how they are trained.

In order to restore vitality in America’s skilled work force, we need to find answers to the following questions.

How do we keep public Career training programs current and relevant to industry needs?

How can we upgrade the public perception of Career and technical education students? Of careers in the skilled trade professions?

How can business and industry show support for the best vocational programs and students in public education?

How could we create a venue and an incentive for demonstrating top student performance?

How can we provide a nationally prominent forum for education and business to interact and exchange ideas, to unite their respective cultures in driving quality to education and qualified skilled workers to American industries?

How can business and industry effectively transmit to vocational educators the current standards of performance for entry-level skilled workers?

The American public needs to learn about, and understand, the need for skilled workers and how they're trained. SkillsUSA shows these training programs in a positive light.

We, as Americans, need to adopt a new attitude about work and jobs. Other nations value vocational and technical skills so much they have national policies, practices and programs to upgrade continuously the knowledge and skills of their workers. In America, by contrast, we discourage our youth from seeking careers in so-called blue-collar vocations and insist that college education is essential for happiness and success in life, even though only 25 percent of the population ever receive college degrees.

We must help our youth choose satisfying jobs and encourage them to take extensive training and, in return, see that they are well rewarded.
 
Old November 2nd, 2013 #157
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Industries to Watch: Skilled Trades
By Anthony Balderrama | Posted Jan 27th 2011 @ 5:00AM

Professions that require hands-on talent, such as electrical repair, plumbing and HVAC maintenance, fall under the category of skilled trade. You might wonder, "Don't all jobs require skills?" Although the industry name sounds vague, it does point out the unique position of these workers because their skills are tangible in a way that many others aren't.

If, on the coldest morning of the year, your heater stops working, you have to call a HVAC maintenance worker to find out what's wrong. You can't Skype him in or chat with him online. The only way for you to stop seeing your own breath in the cold air of your living room is to have someone come out and work on your heating unit.

Why you should consider it

In a recent Talent Shortage Survey conducted by employment agency Manpower Inc., employers cited skilled trade positions as the most difficult openings to fill. According to the survey, "Skilled trades refers to a broad range of job titles that require workers to possess specialized skills, traditionally learned over a period of time as an apprentice."

In 2010, production of new homes increased 6.1 percent over the previous year, according to the National Association of Home Builders. In December 2010, new housing permits rose 16.7 percent, which signals an impending jump in the construction industry. For skilled trade workers, whose jobs often depend on construction of new homes and buildings, a positive outlook for new apartments and houses is one indicator that business could improve in 2011.

What you need

Although most skilled trade professions don't require a four-year degree, you do need a mix of talent, experience and sometimes a certification or license. Certifications and licenses are often obtainable in less than a year -- sometimes in a matter of weeks, depending on the concentration. Vocational schools, career colleges and technical schools can save you money and time when compared to the expense of earning a two- or four-year diploma.

If your interests lie in the skilled trades and an apprenticeship or certification appeals to you, then you might be one of the most in-demand workers on the market. And according to the Manpower survey, you're not just sought-after here in the United States. Skilled trade workers are the most difficult to find in the global survey of employers; therefore, few workers are more attractive than you right now.

Jobs to consider

To give you an idea of what skilled trade positions are in demand, here are a few positions mentioned in the survey and their expected growth over the coming decade:

1. Electrician

Unless we manage to become a society free of electricity, electricians will continue to be in high demand. Every skyscraper, home, high-rise and storefront needs the expertise of an electrician at certain times. In other words, they won't be going away anytime soon; the most current Bureau of Labor Statistics projects estimate a 12 percent increase of electricians by 2018, totaling a workforce of 777,900 workers. *

What they earn: $58,518 **

2. Carpenter

For every new project requiring an electrician, you can be certain a carpenter is also nearby. When you see a home being built, carpenters are creating the frame, putting up walls, installing windows and doing anything else necessary to give life to the new structure. That's why the BLS expects 1.45 million carpenters to be employed by 2018, a 13 percent increase over the decade.

What they earn: $41,727

3. Plumber

Although plumbers are involved in new construction projects, they are also in high demand due to ongoing maintenance needs in households and businesses. When a pipe bursts, has a clog or a leak -- events that seem to occur at the worst possible times -- plumbers save the day. Although we wish plumbing problems would disappear, they're not going anywhere, which is why you can expect a 15 percent increase over the next decade. In 2018, the total number of plumbers, pipe-fitters and steamfitters could reach 570,500.

What they earn: $51,369

4. Welder

By definition, welding is the processing of joining together two pieces of metal, often using heat. That simple definition fails to convey how many products require the skills of welders. According to the BLS, over 100 processes use welding, including manufacturing of automobiles, ships and spacecraft. Expect to see a work force of 405,600 welders by 2018. And with the U.S. automotive industry bouncing back after its 2008 bailout, 2010 was a strong year for car production. Automotive output in Alabama alone experienced a 52 percent increase in 2010, suggesting that welders in these production plants will be busy well into 2011.

What they earn: $46,657

5. Heating, air-conditioning and refrigeration mechanics and installers

Because heating and cooling systems need service and maintenance year-round at both commercial and residential properties, HVAC mechanics and installers are constantly in demand. With a 28 percent increase by 2018, the number of HVAC mechanics and installers could total 394,800.

What they earn: $54,366


http://jobs.aol.com/articles/2011/01...killed-trades/
 
Old November 28th, 2013 #158
Alex Linder
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yale these days.

http://gawker.com/yale-professor-fou...ell-1472985785
 
Old November 28th, 2013 #159
Mike in Denver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr A.Anderson View Post
Industries to Watch: Skilled Trades

1. Electrician

What they earn: $58,518 **

2. Carpenter

What they earn: $41,727

3. Plumber

What they earn: $51,369

4. Welder

What they earn: $46,657

5. Heating, air-conditioning and refrigeration mechanics and installers

What they earn: $54,366
Good advice, that is for 1988, maybe 1992. The wages listed in the article are what HVAC, welders, plumbers, carpenters, electricians made twenty, thirty years ago. Today if they are lucky to work for a large company they make half that, no health care, no benefits. If they are independent contractors they fight for $12 an hour, with no health care or benefits. Welcome to the new world.

Mike
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Hunter S. Thompson, "Big dark, coming soon"
 
Old December 5th, 2013 #160
Alex Linder
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NRB628Usigmaoctans1L U
Quote:
Yeah, I some ways I agree, there are a lot of relatively stupid people in college. But like others are saying, the "trade school" option is rapidly becoming a dead end too, as labor moves overseas and blue-collar wages hit rock bottom.
Negative.

The job outlook from 2010-2020 is +20-26 percent from carpenters, electricians, and plumbers. Those were the only three I looked up. Numbers are from the OOH—so that's federal government data.

Wages for those jobs are not hitting rock bottom—or even declining.

And I hope you aren't dumb enough to think that everyone in college who isn't doing well is "stupid." I'm a college counselor and from my experience, most of these kids' main problem is that they just don't give a damn—often times because they have no interest. Most people tend to perform poorly when they have no interest or motivation.

Many kids are only in school because they are under the impression that they will make money with a college degree, that they can't make money without a college degree, they didn't know what else to do, didn't want to seem like a loser, and/or their parents told them to. Those are not reasons to shell out tens of thousands of dollars. Yesterday 12:32pm

http://gawker.com/good-maybe-kids-wi...f-w-1476352494

The counselor nails it: you must very consciously and deliberately THINK. THINK about why you are going to college. What you will get out of it in relation to price. If you can't come up with a solid answer, you're going to end up deep in debt with little to show for it. In fact, that is the default position of college grads these days. Without active thought and effort, that is where you too will end up.
 
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