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Old January 30th, 2018 #1
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Default Testimonies from Greece

Testimonies from Greece

By Panagiotis Heliotis

Greek scholar Panagiotis Heliotis reviews a series of books written by Greek Jews who were deported to Auschwitz during the Second World War, with a focus on their description of the alleged extermination procedures. Do these stories support or undermine the orthodox Auschwitz narrative?


Some Testimonies from Thessaloniki

Oral Testimonies of the Jews from Thessaloniki about the Holocaust. What’s this you ask? This is the book we are going to focus on this time. As survivor testimonies are very important for the official storyline, it’s clear that the more of them we examine, the closer we get to the truth. Testimonies are also a big hurdle for many people to even consider taking a look at Holocaust revisionism, as they tend to think that so many survivors cannot possibly be lying. They can’t be blamed for that, and indeed, most of the survivors are certainly not lying. The problem is that very few people have actually read a single testimony, and those that have done so, did not do it carefully. So, let’s get down to it.

https://codoh.com/library/document/5146/?lang=en

Some More Testimonies from Greece

Continuing from the previous article, we will examine some more Greek testimonies, this time from the book The Holocaust in the Testimonies of the Greek Jews (To olokautoma stis martyries ton ellinon evraion). This book contains excerpts from published testimonies as well as oral ones. We will examine the most important concerning the extermination claims.

https://codoh.com/library/document/5161/?lang=en

The Violinist

Do you ever go to concerts? Meet Jacob (Jacques) Stroumsa, the violinist of Auschwitz.

Stroumsa was an electrical engineer and an amateur violinist. He arrived at Birkenau on May 8, 1943. After spending one month at the camp orchestra, he was transferred to Auschwitz where, after some gardening duties, he managed to find a job fitting his expertise: in a metal factory. On January 1945 he was sent to Mauthausen on a “death march,” then to Gusen, then back to Mauthausen, then Gusen II where he was liberated by the Americans on May 8, 1945. After the war, he lived in Paris before emigrating to Israel in 1967.

His memoir Geiger in Auschwitz was published in 1993, in English in 1996, and in Greek in 1997 under the title I Chose Life.[1] Let’s see what we can find in it that either supports or undermines the orthodox narrative.

https://codoh.com/library/document/5281/?lang=en

Memories of a Thessalonian Jewess

Erika Kounio was the editor of the book Oral Testimonies of the Jews from Thessaloniki about the Holocaust examined in an earlier article. As she was also a Holocaust survivor, we will now have a look at her own memoir, 50 Years Later: Memories of a Thessalonian Jewess.[1]

Kounio was deported along with her family to Birkenau on March 20, 1943 at age 15. Since she and her parents could speak German, they worked as interpreters. Later she was transferred to Auschwitz where she worked as a secretary, filling in the death registers. On January 18, 1945, when the camp was evacuated, she was sent on a “death march” to Ravensbrück, and later from there to an unknown destination. Along with other prisoners, they managed to escape and hid in a deserted barn. The Russians found them a few days later, and she eventually returned to Greece.

Despite working as a secretary, she had a really hard time at Auschwitz. But what exactly does she tell us regarding the extermination claims?

https://codoh.com/library/document/5282/?lang=en

The Diary of Prisoner Number 109565

We examined the memoir of Erika Kounio earlier. This time is the turn of her brother, Heinz Kounio, who also wrote a memoir: A Liter of Soup and Sixty Grams of Bread: The Diary of Prisoner Number 109565 (first published in Greek in 1981 under the title I Lived Death and later in English and German).

Kounio was deported to Auschwitz on March 20, 1943 at the age of 15. He and his father were sent to work at the tailor shop where they stayed until the evacuation in January 1945. Afterwards he was sent to Mauthausen, then Melk, and finally Ebensee, where he was liberated by the Americans on May 6, 1945. While at Melk he started keeping a diary which served as the basis for his book.

Kounio’s experience is typical of most Holocaust survivors: Hard work, illness, beatings, anguish and extreme hunger. But what does he have to say about the extermination story?

https://codoh.com/library/document/5283/?lang=en

From Athens to Auschwitz

Are our readers ready to look into yet another testimony? Sit back and relax. Tonight’s guest of honor is Errikos Sevillias. So let’s go.

Sevillias was deported from Athens to Auschwitz and then Birkenau in 1944 at the age of 43. His memoir Athens-Auschwitz was published first in English in 1983 (Lycabettus Press, Athens) and then in Greek in 1995 (Αθήνα - Άουσβιτς, Vivliopōleion tēs “Hestias,” Athens). His account is generally believable. Simple, clear, and with no verbalisms. After his stay in Birkenau, he was transferred to Breslau which proved to be much worse as he had to work at night shifts in the freezing cold. He suffered severely from hunger, frostbites and lice, as there were no cleaning measures (in Birkenau he received clean clothes every week). Upon liberation, he was 32 kg and at the brink of death. He slowly recovered and returned to Greece. So let’s see what he has to say about the extermination claims.

https://codoh.com/library/document/5284/?lang=en

From Greece to Birkenau

Without a doubt the most important piece of evidence regarding the Holocaust are the testimonies of the members of the so-called Sonderkommandos. They were the workers in the crematories who allegedly took the bodies from the gas chambers to be cremated. Normally, such witnesses should not exist, as the orthodox narrative has it that they were killed every few months to be replaced by others. And yet they do, even claiming that they were Sonderkommando members for many months, even years.

https://codoh.com/library/document/5285/?lang=en
 
Old April 6th, 2018 #2
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The Manuscripts of Marcel Nadjari

Greetings to all. Remember Marcel Nadjari? He was a Greek Jew deported to Auschwitz in April 1944 where he supposedly worked in the Sonderkommando of Crematorium III. After the evacuation of the camp, he was sent to Mauthausen, then Melk, then Gusen II, then back to Mauthausen before liberation. In 1951, he moved to New York where he died in 1971 at age 54.

https://codoh.com/library/document/5461/?lang=en
 
Old November 5th, 2018 #3
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Batmetzner Returns

By Panagiotis Heliotis

2018-11-03

Ahoy there dear readers. Remember our Holocaustcontroversies.com superhero Hans Metzner who tried a few weeks ago to defend Nadjari’s testimony? Well he’s back to save the day and it looks like he has managed to locate those gardens! Bravo! He still hasn’t corrected those typos though, except for the Misko reference. Regarding this, he again complains in a postscript (tissues please):

the name "Misko" of the comrade Nadjari addressed was taken from Polian's translation; it turns out to read "Mitso" but that's hardly something I can be hold responsible let aside mocked for.”

Well of course Mr. Metzner! That’s why I wrote about someone (obviously not you) forgetting to put on his glasses. It should probably come as no surprise that our hero has failed to understand even that. On the other hand, he is not entirely without fault. This is what you get when you are nothing but a copy-paste blogger. He also writes:

https://codoh.com/library/document/6209/?lang=en
 
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