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Old February 10th, 2013 #1
Alex Linder
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http://www.salon.com/2013/02/09/scie...ction_partner/

An international team of scientists has come up with the most precise date yet for the extinction of the dinosaurs, BBC News reported. Their radiometric dating analysis of rock and ash samples indicates that the dinosaurs died out 66,038,000 years ago, plus or minus 11,000 years.
 
Old February 10th, 2013 #2
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I like what you said on a Radio Istina broadcast that relates to this subject which was essentially that the Earth doesn't care who or what populates it, it has already seen numerous species die out so it won't care if Whites become another dead species. It is up to Whites to save themselves.
 
Old September 14th, 2013 #3
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Well, it looks like we may never have our own Jurassic Park. Scientists at the University of Manchester failed to pull DNA samples from insects trapped in 10,600 year-old amber, leading them to conclude that the chances of extracting intact DNA from samples millions of years older is likely impossible.

For those living in a paleolithic-era cave, the dinosaurs in Spielberg's 1993 classic, Jurassic Park, were spawned from DNA samples taken from amber-trapped ancient insects engorged with dinosaur blood. It's a fascinating idea, but unfortunately — or fortunately, depending on your opinion of dinosaurs — it's probably not gonna happen.

In the new study, David Penney and colleagues tried to extract DNA from insects in subfossilized copal, the hardened resin from trees that's a precursor to amber. But they couldn't do it; they weren't able to detect an ancient DNA in samples ranging in age from 60 to 10,10,600 years old.

The researchers used stingless bees encased in copal to try and detect DNA sequences from the insects.

Interestingly, in the youngest specimens, they were able to match some isolated sequences of just over 500 nucleotides — the molecular building blocks of DNA. But they were unsuccessful in matching the isolated sequences to genes from modern stingless bees.

"Intuitively, one might imagine that the complete and rapid engulfment in resin, resulting in almost instantaneous demise, might promote the preservation of DNA in a resin entombed insect, but this appears not to be the case," noted Penney to The Telegraph, "So, unfortunately, the Jurassic Park scenario must remain in the realms of fiction."

This is all a bit of a moot point, by the way. Late last year scientists were able to peg the half-life of DNA at 521 years, meaning that, under ideal conditions, every last piece of DNA would be gone by 6.8 million years, and there would only be enough to be readable at around 1.5 million years. The dinos went dodo about 65 million years ago.

Read the entire study at PLOS One: "Absence of Ancient DNA in Sub-Fossil Insect Inclusions Preserved in ‘Anthropocene’ Colombian Copal."

Dinosaur DNA cannot be extracted from amber
 
Old November 23rd, 2013 #4
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Default Giant ‘Siats’ dinosaur discovered, second only to the T.rex in North America

Utah is making a name for itself as the place to unearth dinosaurs. Earlier this year a big-nosed dinosaur was discovered in the state, and just recently a relative of the Tyrannosaurus rex was also unearthed. Today, yet another dinosaur has been discovered: Siats meekerorum. While its name might sound tame, Siats refers to the man-eating monster from the mythology of the Ute Native American people. Siats "was a colossal predator second only to the great T. rex," explains Lindsay Zanno, director of Paleontology at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.

"A giant 'man eater'"

Siats weighed more than 4 tons and was over 30 feet long, making it a giant carnivorous dinosaur. It might be second only to the T.rex, but it’s not a close relative. Unlike the T.rex, Siats lived in the cretaceous period of dinosaurs that walked the earth around 100 million years ago. While some types of Tyrannosaurus roamed alongside Siats, it wasn’t until Siats became extinct that the Tyrannosaurus family started evolving and growing. During its period on earth, Siats terrorized smaller dinosaurs to prevent them from becoming top predators for millions of years.

Scientists haven’t discovered one of these types of dinosaurs for over 60 years, making this a significant find and one of the three largest-ever discovered in North America. Siats is also unique as it helps scientists piece together a 30-million-year gap in the fossil record of North American large, predatory dinosaurs. "Siats is just the tip of the iceberg; our teams are unearthing a lost dinosaurian ecosystem right here in the badlands of western North America," says Zanno.

http://www.theverge.com/2013/11/22/5...discovery-utah

[visit link for image and more]
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Old December 1st, 2013 #5
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Default Baby Dinosaur Skeleton Unearthed In Canada



The tiny, intact skeleton of a baby rhinoceroslike dinosaur has been unearthed in Canada.

The toddler was just 3 years old and 5 feet (1.5 meters) long when it wandered into a river near Alberta, Canada, and drowned about 70 million years ago. The beast was so well-preserved that some of its skin left impressions in the nearby rock.

The fossil is the smallest intact skeleton ever found from a group of horned, plant-eating dinosaurs known as ceratopsids, a group that includes the iconic Triceratops.

Rare find

Finding intact baby dinosaurs is incredibly rare.

"The big ones just preserve better: They don't get eaten, they don't get destroyed by animals," said study co-author Philip Currie, a paleobiologist at the University of Alberta. "You always hope you're going to find something small and that it will turn out to be a dinosaur."




Paleontologists had unearthed a few individual bones from smaller ceratopsids in the past. But without intact juvenile skeletons, such bones aren't very useful, as scientists don't really know how each bone changes during each stage of the animals' lives, Currie said.

The team was bone-hunting in Dinosaur Provincial Park in Alberta when Currie came upon what looked like a turtle shell sticking out from a hillside. Upon closer inspection, the fossil turned out to be a frill, the bony decorative headgear that surrounds the back of the head in ceratopsids.

When the team excavated, they found the fossilized skeleton of a tiny dinosaur they identified as a Chasmosaurus belli, a species commonly found in the area.

Drowning victim

Amazingly, almost the entire skeleton was intact, although sometime in the past, a sinkhole had opened up below the beast and the forelimbs had fallen away into an abyss. The fossil was so well-preserved that the tiny, rosettelike pattern on its skin was imprinted in the rock below the dinosaur.

Based on its size, the team estimates the dinosaur was about 3 years old — just out of infancy — when it perished. (Like humans, these dinosaurs typically take about 20 years to reach maturity, at which point they have 6.5-foot-long [2 meters] skulls and weigh 3 to 4 tons.)

The fossil was found in sediments associated with watery environments and didn't have any bite marks or trace of injury, so it's likely the dino toddler likely drowned.

"I think it may have just gotten trapped out of its league in terms of water current," Currie told LiveScience.

Soon after, the baby dinosaur was buried by sediments and left untouched for millions of years.

Growth rates

Aside from being cute, the new fossil helps paleontologists understand how these plant-eating dinosaurs grew. Paleontologists can then better identify and age the myriad individual bones from juveniles discovered over the years.

Already, the team has learned that Chasmosaur juvenile frills look different from those on adults, and that limb proportions don't change much as they grow. Predatory theropods such as Tyrannosaurus rex have disproportionately long limbs as juveniles, presumably to keep up with the adults in the pack.

By contrast, "in Chasmosaurians, the proportions are essentially the same, which probably means the adults were probably never moving that fast," Currie said. "There was never priority for these animals to run to ke
ep up with the adults.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/1...n_4338570.html
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Old December 3rd, 2013 #6
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(TERUEL, Spain) - An open pit coal mine near the town of Ariño, Spain has resulted in the discovery of the most completely preserved ankylosaur ever found in Europe. It is also the oldest known nodosaurid a family of ankylosaurs with wide, heavily armored bodies and have spiny sides and lack the tail clubs of their ankylosaurid cousins. The discovery of the dinosaur was announced today in the open-access scientific journal PLOS ONE. Based on two skeletons, the dinosaur was named Europelta carbonensis, which literally means Europe’s shield from the coal. The fossil site has produced multiple skeletons of animals in addition to Europelta. Dr. Luis Alcalá a co-author of the study said, “Spain represents the site of some of Europe’s most important dinosaur discoveries in recent years”.

The study was led by Dr. James Kirkland of the Geological Survey of Utah, Dr. Luis Alcalá of Fundación Conjunto Paleontológico de Teruel-Dinópolis/Museo Aragonés de Paleontología, and Dr. Mark Loewen, Research Associate at the Natural History Museum of Utah and Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah. Additional collaborative authors include Eduardo Espílez and Luis Mampel (Fundación Conjunto Paleontológico de Teruel-Dinópolis/Museo Aragonés de Paleontología) and Jelle Wiersma (Natural History Museum of Utah and Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah).

Comparisons were made between the new specimens and ankylosaurs previously reported from North America Europe and other parts of the world. Dr. Mark Loewen, a co-author said, “these skeletons provide ample evidence to propose the hypothesis that all the known European nodosaurids belong to a distinct group, the Struthiosaurine, separate from North America’s nodosaurids based on distinctive features in their shoulders, hips, and legs”. Another group of ankylosaurs, the polacanthids (with distinct triangular heads and sharp plates running down the sides of their tails) predated the nodosaurids in both North America and Europe in the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous until their extinction about 120 million years ago. Immediately after this extinction, the first nodosaurids appear on both continents. This dramatic turnover does happen at the boundary of a geological time interval, but happened near the middle of the Aptian Age well before the end of the Early Cretaceous. The cause for this replacement is unknown, but for these low browsing plant-eaters the rapid diversification and rise to dominance of flowering plants at this time may have been a factor. Furthermore, CO2 levels, temperatures and sealevels were increasing to record highs at this time. The discovery of Europelta and the recognition of the struthiosaurines lend support to the theory that, as the continents flooded, Europe became isolated from North America following the initial appearance of the Nodosauridae. The study’s lead author Dr. James Kirkland said: “the diversification of nodosaurids separately on North America and Europe appears to correlate with rising sealevels flooding most of Europe to form an archipelago, isolating these dinosaurs even though the Atlantic Ocean had not fully opened as yet”.

http://www.kcsg.com/view/full_story/...re_local_news1
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Old December 21st, 2013 #7
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Default Acheroraptor temertyorum: New Dinosaur Discovered in Montana

Canadian paleontologists have described a new genus and species of raptor dinosaur that lived in western North America about 66 million years ago, at the same time as the giant Tyrannosaurus rex and the herbivorous Triceratops.


This is an artist’s impression of the newly discovered Acheroraptor temertyorum, which lived at the same time as Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops. Image credit: Julius Csotonyi.

The new dinosaur, named Acheroraptor temertyorum, was a relatively large, carnivorous, two-legged raptor.

The creature measured about 3 m in length and weighed in at about 40 kg. It had a long-snouted skull, dagger-like ridged teeth and was likely covered in feathers.

Acheroraptor temertyorum is a close cousin of the Velociraptor and the youngest known member of the raptor family, known as dromaeosaurids.

The jawbone fossils of the raptor were collected from the Hell Creek formation in Montana.

Looking at the teeth of Acheroraptor temertyorum along with a larger sample of teeth from small meat-eating dinosaurs, the paleontologists say “the evidence suggests a decline in raptor diversity in North America just before the end of the Cretaceous.”

“Acheroraptor gives us a more complete picture of the ecosystem in North America just before the great extinction that marked the end of the Age of Dinosaurs,” says Dr David Evans from both the University of Toronto and the Royal Ontario Museum, the lead author of the paper describing Acheroraptor temertyorum in the journal Naturwissenschaften.


Acheroraptor temertyorum. Image credit: Emily Willoughby, www.emilywilloughby.com / CC-BY-3.0.

“The close evolutionary relationship of Acheroraptor to a small group of late-occurring Asian species that includes Velociraptor suggests migration from Asia continued to shape North American dinosaur communities right up until the end of the Cretaceous period.”

The genus name of Acheroraptor temertyorum means ‘Acheron Plunderer,’ a clever derivation from ‘Acheron,’ the name of the River of Pain in the mythical underworld of Ancient Greece, thereby acknowledging the location of the fossils.


Holotype maxilla and associated dentary of Acheroraptor temertyorum. Image credit: Royal Ontario Museum.

The species name, temertyorum, honors James and Louise Temerty, for their outstanding service and contributions to the Royal Ontario Museum.

http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology...ana-01630.html
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Old February 19th, 2014 #8
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Default Fish-eating dinosaur fossil discovered in Pahang



PETALING JAYA: Fossil remains of a carnivorous “fish-eating” dinosaur has been discovered in Malaysia, with Universiti Malaya set to unveil the evidence today.

Discovered in the rural interiors of Pahang, the fossil remains of the spinosauridae dinosaur are believed to be from the late Mesozoic era, most likely from the Cretaceous period between 65 million and 145.5 million years ago.

This is believed to be the first time that fossil remains of a dinosaur have been found in Malaysia.

The dinosaur remains had been identified by a team led by Associate Professor Dr Masatoshi Sone of the university’s geology department in collaboration with reptile paleontology specialist Professor Ren Hirayama from Tokyo’s Waseda University.

Spinosauridae is a particular family of carnivorous dinosaurs characterised by its elongated, crocodile-like skulls with conical teeth that had either very tiny or with no serrations.

Another spinosauridae fossil had also been discovered in Australia in 2011, before which the species was believed to have existed only in the northern hemisphere.

Scientists had discovered a 125-million-year-old neck vertebrae identical to that of a Baryonx in Victoria, Australia.

Dr Masatoshi will be attending today’s press conference, along with Pahang Mentri Besar Datuk Seri Adnan Yaakob, UM vice-chancellor Professor Datuk Dr Mohd Amin Jalaludin and the Science Faculty dean Professor Datuk Dr Mohd Sofian Azirun.

http://www.thestar.com.my/News/Natio...red-in-Pahang/
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Old June 20th, 2014 #9
Alex Linder
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Say hello to Mercuriceratops, the newest species of dinosaurs.

Unlike the other 60-plus known species of horned dinosaurs, Mercuriceratops has wing-like protrusions on the side of its skull.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/n...very/10870703/


Mercuriceratops gemini skull fossils were discovered in a quarry in Dinosaur Provincial Park in Alberta, Canada.

 
Old February 1st, 2016 #10
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Could You Outrun a Hungry Tyrannosaur?


One question has always burned in the minds of paleontologists: If Tyrannosaurus rex was still around today, would it be able to catch and eat you?

The problem stems from our ability to accurately reconstruct the speed of extinct animals when all you have to go off are their bones. Trying to figure out where all the muscles went and the forces exerted by them during sprints, especially with dinosaurs, is no easy task.

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-.../#.Vq9jisv2Z9D
 
Old March 13th, 2016 #11
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Is this 'fierce lizard' a missing link in dinosaur evolution?


The 5-foot-long, 250-million-year-old reptileappears to have been a link between primitive reptiles and more modern looking reptiles called archosauriforms.

Paleontologists in Brazil have discovered a new fossilized 250-million-year-old reptile that could represent a long-sought missing link between primitive reptiles and the precursors to modern birds and crocodiles.

http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/201...saur-evolution
 
Old March 15th, 2016 #12
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Is that dino a boy or a girl? Pregnant T. rex might help identify sexes.

Researchers have confirmed a Tyrannosaurus rex was ready to lay eggs within weeks of her death. Having a definitively female dinosaur skeleton could yield clues as to how to sex-type other specimens.

Researchers have found a Tyrannosaurus rex that was pregnant when it died some 68 million years ago – a discovery that could help paleontologists figure out how to distinguish between male and female therapod dinosaurs.

http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/201...identify-sexes
 
Old April 27th, 2016 #13
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Newly discovered titanosaurian dinosaur from Argentina, Sarmientosaurus


Scientists have discovered Sarmientosaurus musacchioi, a new species of titanosaurian dinosaur, based on an complete skull and partial neck fossil unearthed in Patagonia, Argentina, according to a study published April 26, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Rubén Martínez from the Laboratorio de Paleovertebrados of the Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia San Juan Bosco (UNPSJB), Argentina, and colleagues.

http://phys.org/news/2016-04-newly-t...aurus.html#jCp
 
Old May 4th, 2016 #14
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Hiker Stumbles Upon Well-Preserved 230 Million-Year-Old Dinosaur Footprint in Spain

A hiker has made an incredible discovery in the hills north of Barcelona when he found a well-preserved footprint of a dinosaur that wandered the area about 230 million years ago.

According to Mirror UK, the hiker discovered the prints at Olesa de Montserrat area, about 25 miles from the city.

http://www.natureworldnews.com/artic...t-in-spain.htm
 
Old May 19th, 2016 #15
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New Horned Dinosaur Species Unearthed In Utah

The two-ton plant-eater Machairoceratops cronusi had four horns and lived 77 million years ago.


A new species of horned dinosaur has been unearthed by scientists in southern Utah.

Remains of the animal, named Machairoceratops cronusi, suggest it was about 26 feet long, weighed two tons and ate plants. The first traces were found a decade ago in an area rich with the remains of centrosaurines — large-bodied, plant-eating dinosaurs that roamed North America and Asia 77 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous period.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...b0646cbeebc520
 
Old May 22nd, 2016 #16
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New Theory Makes T. Rexes A Bit Less Terrifying


One of the world's most famous predators, the fearsome Tyrannosaurus Rex is typically shown baring dozens of sharp, jagged teeth — but a Toronto researcher says the carnivore likely had lips to cover them.

Robert Reisz, a professor at the University of Toronto who specializes in vertebrate paleontology, says that contrary to what's shown in movies and even museums, T. Rex and his fellow theropods would not have teeth that stick out even when their mouths are closed.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/05..._10051394.html
 
Old July 14th, 2016 #17
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New Dinosaur Lineage, Gualicho Shinyae, With Tiny Arms Discovered In Argentina


Fossils found in the Patagonia region of Argentina belonged to a previously unknown dinosaur from the same group that includes the Tyrannosaurus Rex. Like its famous cousin, despite its hulking body size — between 20 feet to 26 feet — the carnivore had tiny arms that measured only about 2 feet.

http://www.ibtimes.com/new-dinosaur-...entina-2391445
 
Old July 21st, 2016 #18
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Dinosaur Species Found In Argentina In 2000 Finally Given A Name


University of Alberta professor Philip Currie and his team found bones from a cliff in Argentina over a decade ago, and in a paper published this month, it seems that the specimen they gathered may as well be a new species of megaraptorid - or a giant raptor.

http://www.scienceworldreport.com/ar...given-name.htm
 
Old August 12th, 2016 #19
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Newly-discovered Siberian dinosaur was as heavy as 7 male African éléphants


The new species of giant dinosaur that lived 100 million years ago belonged to a group that included some of the largest to roam the Earth. Related to the Titanosaur, its fossils have been painstakingly dug from Kemerevo region over recent years.

http://siberiantimes.com/science/cas...can-elephants/
 
Old August 19th, 2016 #20
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Paleontologists with the UW’s Burke Museum discover major T. rex fossil


Paleontologists with the University of Washington’s Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture have discovered a Tyrannosaurus rex, including a very complete skull. The find, which paleontologists estimate to be about 20 percent of the animal, includes vertebrae, ribs, hips and lower jaw bones.

http://www.washington.edu/news/2016/...-t-rex-fossil/
 
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