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Old February 8th, 2013 #41
Mr A.Anderson
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Found a literal mother lode of ammunition and tactical firearms today. I made a significant purchase.

.223 Hornady 55gr FMJ, 500 rounds for $400 ($0.80 ppr)
.308 FMJ, 1000 rounds for $1000 ($1.00 ppr)
.40 S&W, name your brand, JHP
9mm, Federal Guard Dog 105 gr, Remington Golden Saber 124 gr, name your brand FMJ.

.380, 10mm, .45acp, .44 mag, .38 special - fully stocked, name your brand.

Tactical semi-automatics all over the shelves, .22lr, 9mm, 7.62x39, 5.56, and 7.62x51.

.50 BMG, single shot, bolt action, semi-auto

The place was a mad house. One guy was there from Colorado - purchasing 6 tactical semi-automatics - cash.

Buckeye Firearms - Rogers, Ohio.
http://buckeyefirearmsohio.com/Rogers.html
 
Old February 12th, 2013 #42
Mr A.Anderson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gil Irwin View Post
From another thread. Thanks Gil!
 
Old February 25th, 2013 #43
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Holy fucking hell.

Wolf brand, .22lr, box of 500 on the shelf.

$94.99!

Six months ago, I was buying them for $24.99 at the same place.
 
Old March 3rd, 2013 #44
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Originally Posted by Mr A.Anderson View Post
Holy fucking hell.

Wolf brand, .22lr, box of 500 on the shelf.

$94.99!

Six months ago, I was buying them for $24.99 at the same place.
 
Old March 3rd, 2013 #45
Mr A.Anderson
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.308 Win are hard to find, and when you can, the prices are outrageous now.



I did pick up a box of Hornady Z-max in the .308 Win. I don't think the small shop knew what they had, because I got them for a song and a dance.

If you don't know, Hornady's Z-max (Zombie Ammunition) is real ammo, just with the zombie gimmick. The centerfire rounds are the same as the A-max (proven high quality bullet design), just with a green polymer ballistic tip instead of a red one.


Last edited by Mr A.Anderson; March 3rd, 2013 at 09:18 AM.
 
Old March 3rd, 2013 #46
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Yesterday, there were slim pickings on the 9mm shelves at my local shop. I did buy a box of Speer Gold Dot 115 gr JHP for $26.99.

Today, the shelves were almost completely bare for the 9mm. All that was left was Federal Hydro-shok and Guard Dog - both of which are completely shit rounds.

If you don't have enough, go to the stores now! DHS ordered another 11+ Million rounds of 9mm last month!

The top 2 shelves were 9mm. The bottom shelf is .357 Sig and .38 special.


Last edited by Mr A.Anderson; March 3rd, 2013 at 11:41 PM.
 
Old April 13th, 2013 #47
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Went to a few shops today. 9mm, .40 S&W, and .22lr are non existant. I did find some 5.56 and .223 suprisingly, limit 100 rounds per customer at $12.99 a box 20 count. .308 Win has reappeared, $30-$50 a box of 20.
 
Old November 2nd, 2013 #48
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Quote:
Doe Run workers to be cut at end of December

October 16, 2013 11:00 pm

HERCULANEUM • About 145 employees of the Doe Run lead smelter have learned they will lose their jobs at the end of December because of the plant’s closure, the Doe Run Co. said Wednesday. An additional 73 contractor jobs also will be eliminated.

The job cuts were expected. The plant, which has operated for more than a century and is the lone remaining lead smelter in the United States, announced in 2010 that it will cease operations at the end of this year.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said the company “made a business decision” to shut down the smelter instead of installing pollution control technologies needed to reduce sulfur dioxide and lead emissions as required by the Clean Air Act.

The Doe Run Co. announced last year that it had dropped plans to build a new lead processing facility in Herculaneum that would have used a new, cleaner lead production technology. The company cited the

$100 million project as too financially risky.

Employees were notified of their future with the company or of their impending layoff between Sept. 30 and Oct. 8 in face-to-face meetings, said Tammy Stankey, a company spokeswoman.

The company will keep about 75 employees into 2014 to operate its refinery and strip mill and to prepare the property “for closure and repurposing.” It expects to have transferred 43 employees to other Doe Run divisions by this year’s end, according to a company statement.

Some operations, such as the water treatment plant, will operate indefinitely, and a maintenance staff will remain to “maintain essential facilities,” the company said.

The company said it had been working with employees for months to help them transition to new roles and had set up a career center to help with resume writing, interviewing and job searches.

“We have a very talented workforce and encourage businesses looking for dedicated, hardworking and skilled employees to contact us,” Gary Hughes, general manager of the smelter, said in the statement.

http://www.stltoday.com/business/loc...4715f3c2d.html
Ammunition, already scarce in specific calibers and very expensive when you can find it, is going to continue to be in a shortage.

Quote:
A couple of years ago we opined that the anti-gun establishment had found a loophole for the Second Amendment and that rather than targeting the banning of all firearms, they would instead turn their attention to ammunition.

The government’s most recent efforts to reduce open market availability through taxation, individual purchase restrictions and a massive stockpiling effort by the Department of Homeland Security has forced ammunition prices to nearly triple, while also dwindling supplies of many popular calibers.

But they’re not done yet.

In fact, they may have finally found a way to circumvent U.S.-based domestic production altogether.

The all-out attack on Americans’ gun rights is now being taken to the next level.

The goal is to regulate all forms of ammunition out of existence, and they’re starting with Doe Run, which is the last of America’s domestic lead processing and manufacturing facilities.


Now, the only ore-to-lead producer in America… the largest in the Western world… has been shut down by EPA regulation.

EPA’s regulatory uncertainty and an estimated $100 million to convert [to non-smelter manufacturing] caused the company to finally throw in the towel.

It’s not just ammunition that’s dissapearing. American industry… American jobs…. are being regulated out of existence as well.

Lead’s still going to be manufactured in China, but it’ll be done without any environmental oversight, it’ll be scarce, it’ll be expensive, and we’ll have fragile supply lines.



It’s party of multi-pronged attack on ammunition.
■Drying up the market by hoarding billions of rounds
■Shutting down the market with background checks, registration, and banning of online sales
■Environmental regulation to ban the use and manufacture of lead

And after we can no longer manufacture ammunition domestically we have the UN Arms Trade Treaty to stop the importation of ammunition.


…If you look at the multiple ways they’re trying to remove all ammunition… not just certain guns they believe are dangerous… there’s no question that this is about all-out gun control.
Quote:
Doe Run is scheduled to layoff its workforce and close its doors before the end of the year.

With no more lead being processed in America, we are now completely dependent on our largest creditor, China, to supply the necessary base metals for ammunition production.

This will have the immediate effect of further limiting supplies, while also increasing prices, and we can expect this soon after Doe Run’s closure this December.

Furthermore, in April of this year James Rawles of SurvivalBlog.com detailed new importation restrictions set forth in a Presidential Executive Action following the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, which bans the importation of military surplus items that include magazines, firearms accessories and, of course, foreign ammunition.

Couple this with the implementation of U.N. “authorized” trade restrictions set forth in the new UN Arms Trade Treaty, and you can see where this is headed.

It is not an over-exaggeration to suggest that ammunition supply lines will soon be cut, effectively making it nearly impossible to acquire.
http://www.shtfplan.com/headline-new...quits_11012013
I did find some 9mm yesterday in Walmart of all places.

Federal 9mm, 115gr FMJ, brass casing, 100 count for $25.

Talking with the sales lady, I found that Walmart still offers ammunition at uninflated prices, although it limits the amount of ammunition a customer can buy in a 24 hr time period to 3 boxes. The key is......being there when it hits the shelves, because it sells out immediately.

After some small talk, I found that my local store usually recieves a shipment of ammunition (they never know how much or in what calibers) on a weekly basis, and is stocked overnight.

If you are an early bird, make stopping by your local Walmart sporting goods section part of your early morning routine, and you can score ammunition at pre-shortage prices.
 
Old December 2nd, 2013 #49
Karl LaForce
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I totally agree that there is an all out war on ammunition.
The Obama administration is shredding all the military breaa. The move to ban lead has been in the works for at least the 20 years that I have been paying attention.

Ammunition made of Bismuth has been available in the US for at least 10 years.

Bismuth Bismuth
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Old December 2nd, 2013 #50
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There is a myriad of lead free bullets/ammunition out there, to include expanding/self defense/hunting rounds. They are more expensive, and have always been poorly stocked on the shelves......so at least there is that.

http://www.barnesbullets.com/

http://site.cuttingedgebullets.com/

http://www.nosler.com/ballistic-tip-lead-free/
 
Old December 2nd, 2013 #51
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M855A1 is leadless. Although currently not sold commercially, it will chamber in a 5.56mm platform, and is an utterly devastating round.
 
Old December 2nd, 2013 #52
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Originally Posted by 313Chris View Post
M855A1 is leadless. Although currently not sold commercially, it will chamber in a 5.56mm platform, and is an utterly devastating round.
When it comes to FMJ or non-expanding rounds, the lack of lead is just a minor annoyance. A sabot copper or brass bullet is easy enough to get your hands on. Where lead is an issue is the innexpensive expanding rounds. There are lead free copper self defense and hunting bullets, but they are expensive and harder to find.

Save your old lead tire weights, and see if you can get a few buckets of them from your auto wrecking yards. Barring that.....save up on old pennies (pre 1982) that you can smelt down and mold yourself.
 
Old December 4th, 2013 #53
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Originally Posted by Mr A.Anderson View Post

Save your old lead tire weights, and see if you can get a few buckets of them from your auto wrecking yards. Barring that.....save up on old pennies (pre 1982) that you can smelt down and mold yourself.
The lead wheel weights are about to go the way of the Dodo bird so I recommend stocking up while you can. Some states have already banned them. California is one example. The replacements are either zinc or steel.

The last couple of buckets I got from local tire stores have ran about 25% zinc weights. It is a good idea to pick them out before melting down the lead. I have a propane fired turkey cooker I use, with a stainless steel bucket to melt them in. I clean all the crap out, remove the zinc and iron weights, melt the lead and flux hell out of it with either commercial flux or beeswax, then sprinkle some sawdust on top and stir the liquid lead while the sawdust turns into carbon and skim that off. Then I pour the lead in various ingot molds. My favorite is a cast iron cornbread cooker that casts a Pb (lead) ingot of about a pound or so in the shape of an ear of corn. Almost anything like that will work, the goal is to make an ingot that easily fits into a store-bought lead furnace, either RCBS, Lyman, or Lee.

You do NOT want to melt any of the Zn weights into the lead, it WILL fuck up your alloy, bullets with Zn come out all wrinkled. Fortunately they are easy to spot, they will have the letters "Zn" on them. Also Zn has a bit higher melting point, not much higher but enough that you can catch the Zn weights when you melt the wheel weights down. You have to skim the steel clips out of the molten Pb and any weights that haven't melted yet will probably be zinc, or iron (Fe).

I also segregate out the glue on weights before melting, they are pure lead and are great for muzzle loaders. The normal wheel weights are an alloy of mostly lead with a bit of antimony and tin, and they make an excellent bullet. I usually water drop them from the bullet mold into a 5 gallon bucket of water, this hardens them. Years ago I stocked up on several hundred pounds of linotype which I use sometimes to harden the bullets a bit more. Linotype is lead with a big dose of Sn (tin) and Sb (antimony). A little bit of linotype mixed into wheel weight alloy makes the bullets cast easier. Linotype is hard to get these days because that type of printing is history. Pure tin is easily available, but is rather costly. I stocked up on it years ago. But pure wheel weight alloy works on its own so if you don't have any linotype or tin you can still cast good bullets.

I cast for several calibers, including rifles, .30-06, .35 Whelen, 7.62 X 54 for Mosen Nagants, K31 Swiss, .25-20 (neat little caliber but almost obsolete). My handguns I shoot cast bullets exclusively. Rifle calibers you usually have to slow down the Muzzle velocity so it doesn't lead up your barrel but I make up for that by using a heavier bullet. A 210 grain flat nosed bullet (LBT style) at 1800-2000 fps is nothing to take lightly. I don't cast anything smaller than .25 because dinky little .223 bullets are hard to cast well.
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Old December 6th, 2013 #54
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The situation may not be as dire as initially feared:

http://www.nraila.org/news-issues/ar...d-smelter.aspx
 
Old December 7th, 2013 #55
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Originally Posted by 313Chris View Post
The situation may not be as dire as initially feared:

http://www.nraila.org/news-issues/ar...d-smelter.aspx
I'm at a loss here.

As long as we continue to import lead from China, there won't be any problems. If China decides to jack up the prices of lead, or stop importing, every manufacturing process that requires lead in this country is fucked.

I do believe that has been what people have been saying.

For some reason, people thought that once this plant shut down, there wouldn't be any more lead at all?
 
Old December 7th, 2013 #56
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We have plenty of our own lead, and as that article stated, newer, smaller, lead smelters coming online and are technologically-equipped to satisfy domestic lead demands (of which firearms ammunition only ever constituted a small fraction) while meeting EPA's goofy standards. This looks to me like the ammunition industry was looking for any vague excuse to jack up market prices.
 
Old December 17th, 2013 #57
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22 cal bullits are dirt cheap stock up get solid points if you get hollow points that's ok rub feces into the hollow tips the infections will be epic " it just be a flesh wound homey" but in 36 hours the bacteria will be a serious motherfucker In combat wounding is in many cases better than a kill ..the perps homeys will mostly try to help homey and then you can get off more shots :0 Also there is the " oh damn homey I bees hit fuck it hurts fuckin bad mofo helps me " :0 The psychological factor is a real motherfucker ..The perps are looking for soft targets and if they see they bruders whining they will say " Oh hell na tem crackers be crazy mofos lets move on niggas " I'm military trained and have seen the real shit
 
Old December 25th, 2013 #58
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The Ammo Shortage of 2013

We have seen the enemy, and it is us

Posted June 12, 2013 in Shooting by Pat Cascio with 326 Comments

Iíve been a gun writer for more than 20-years now, and during that time Iíve developed some excellent contacts in the firearms and ammo industries. Recently, I talked to some of these folks and asked them about the ongoing ammo shortage thatís still keeping avid shooters and weekend plinkers alike from doing what they love: sending lead down-range. I learned that though there are a number of different factors contributing to the current ammo shortage, the main reason thereís a shortage is because thereís a shortage. In other words, weíre in the midst of an old-fashioned panic.

Some shooters locate the blame for the current state of affairs in DC, and conspiracy theories abound about the government buying up all the ammo for one shady reason or another. But those theories are wrong, according to the ammo makers Iíve talked to. Sure, the post-Newtown rush to ďDo Something!Ē may have created the climate of fear and uncertainty that initially sparked the current panic, but that panic has now taken on a life of its own and is feeding back into itself. At this point, everybody is panic buying because everybody is panic buying, which means that the shortage wonít stop until the panic subsides.

Ammo makers: wonít get fooled again

You might think that the ammo makers are having a field day with the panic buying, but surges like this arenít quite the windfall that you might think they are for the ammo industry.

The ammo makers are turning out ammo as fast as they can, some of the big name ammo makers Iíve talked to are literally running 24/7. Theyíre also adding more machines and training more personnel to try and meet the demand. But in ramping up capacity, theyíre taking on more risk. When the panic dies down, demand could tank, and then the layoffs will start and all that new capacity will go idle. If this happens, then the ammo makers will have wasted millions in buying machinery and training people to use it. The only way to recover that investment will be to raise the prices on ammunition ó something we donít want to see, nor do they want to do.

Some smaller ammo makers have already fallen by the wayside because they canít get enough raw materials and components to keep up with demand. The biggest shortages we are seeing right now is .22 LR and 9mm, and many makers canít come up with the brass, primers, bullets, and powder to make any more of these popular ammo types. And the shortages are getting worse with each passing day. Many ammo makers have been forced to raise their prices because the cost of components have risen, especially copper for making bullets. Some other ammo makers that I know have gone above and beyond to seek out components, and because they were forced to pay more they in turn had to raise prices. But they only raised their prices by the amounts they are having to pay to get the needed components.

My sources tell me that if things stay the way they are, that it will be between 18 months and 2 years before they can catch-up on back orders. And this is assuming that things donít take a turn for the worse. All we need is another mass shooting or terrorist attack and there will be more talk of gun and ammo controls, which will bring on another round of panic buying, longer waits, higher prices and more shortages.

While local gun shops have been enjoying a brisk run on guns and ammo, they donít like the shortages any more than you and I do. My local gun shop was down to a dozen handguns not too long ago, and couldnít find any from any of their distributors. Luckily, the supply lines have started filling up again, but only for some guns. (I understand that Ruger has a backlog of 2 million guns, and I heard that GLOCK has about a million guns on back-order ó it will take them a while to get caught-up, as some guns are in more demand than others.) The ammo shortage is hurting gun shop owners, because when a gun shop does have some guns to sell, people arenít buying them because there isnít any ammo to available for them. I mean, really? Why purchase a gun if you canít find any ammo for it? Not a good situation at all.

There are some on-line and mail-order companies who have taken advantage of the shortages, especially in regards to ammo, and are charging outrageous prices. I wonít mention names, but one is getting a very bad reputation on the Internet, and a lot of people, myself included, will no longer do business with them. Sure, they have ammo, because they had the money to stock-up on hundreds of millions of rounds. But who in their right mind is willing to pay more than a buck a round for 9mm low-grade ammo these days? Well, thatís what one place is charging, and as much as $3.00 per round for common (not premium) JHP 9mm ammo. When you find a place like this, donít do business with them. You can find ammo if you spend the time looking, and, needless to say, you will be paying more, but thereís no sense in getting ripped off by a greedy on-line or mail-order company taking advantage of the situation.

The solution: stop hoarding ammo

I took my crystal ball out, and most of the time it is working properly, and my prediction is that I honestly donít know if things will ever go back to being normal in the ammo world if we donít change our buying habits. Look, if you donít absolutely need ammo, then donít buy it right now. Give the ammo makers a chance to make some kind of attempt at catching-up with the demand. I have absolutely cut back on the number or rounds I use in my gun test articles. I used to burn through 500 rounds or more in my tests, but these days, Iím cutting back to around 200 rounds for a gun test. And, if your local gun shop or big box store has a limit on the number of boxes of ammo you can purchase at one time, then only buy that much Ė donít send your wife, husband or friends in to buy more ammo for you, because thatís only hurting us all. Gun shops donít like rationing ammo, either ó itís something they have to do these days, so they will have ammo for all their customers.

Yes, I understand, no one wants to get caught with their pants down, and not have enough ammo. But then again, can you define what ďenoughĒ ammo is? Letís see if we canít turn the tide, and start buying ammo the way we used to: slow down, and donít hoard it
- See more at: http://www.alloutdoor.com/2013/06/12....tzvcbjuu.dpuf
 
Old December 25th, 2013 #59
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Got a few boxes of Speer 325gr .480 Ruger for Christmas. Friends and family will agree that I must be the easiest person in the world to shop for.
 
Old July 9th, 2015 #60
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It does make shopping easy...

 
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