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Old March 8th, 2006 #21
janewhite88
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Boy, those CU folks got their panties all in a bind. lol

They will have to ship nigs in cause it is a rich white town. Of course, they have a growing population of illegal spics. But that still can’t be part of the diversity pool since illegals still are not allowed to attend the college. But ya can bet there is a lib jew commie lobby there working that issue day and night. The local rag pushes the social engineering, always editorials on this 'damn lack of diversity here in hip happening Boulder'.

They had a high school teacher there in Boulder that actually adopted an illegal spic student.in hopes that this would legalize him enough where he could attend a USA college who had offered him a baseball scholarship. He lost it once they found out he was an illegal.


Last time I was down that way, town had a juden shop on one of their main drags that flew the Isreali flag. It was a disgusting site indeed. It immediately told me who had the power in that little burg nestled
in the 'shadow of the flat irons'.
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Old March 8th, 2006 #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oy Ze Hate
Kill 'em all. Let God sort 'em out.

Just be sure to use a variety of weapons.

Now that's what I call diversity.
Finally, a subject worth teaching our young people!!! In addition to the three 'Rs, we now will lecture and experience quality practical application in a real world setting. LOL

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Old March 8th, 2006 #23
Agis
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Amherst focuses on diversity

Several Yale students and administrators are questioning whether the University is keeping up with the pack after Amherst College announced a new initiative to attract [non-whites or so-called:] students from low-income backgrounds.

Amherst President Anthony Marx [-jew alert] '81 announced in January that one of the school's primary long-term goals is to increase the enrollment of [non-whites], an objective the school tentatively plans to meet by increasing need-based financial aid awards and reducing the burden of student loans. During the last several years, Yale has enacted similar programs to make the University more accessible to [non-whites] whose families may not be able to pay the sticker price of a Yale education, but some [non-whites] argue that the University's efforts have not gone far enough.

At Amherst, Marx said the college's goal is to focus on providing more need-based aid while avoiding competition with other schools over a small number of applicants. He said he is concerned that an article published Monday in Business Week magazine may have [correctly] represented Amherst's new mission by implying that the school will lower its admissions standards in order to promote diversity.

"Our aim must be to increase the pool of [non-whites] from across the economic spectrum, not to re-shuffle too few students among a few top colleges," Marx said. "We are all also mindful of not wanting to create an arms race that only a few colleges can compete in, and risk forcing other colleges to resort even more to merit aid to compete. That would end up using resources for students less in economic need, and therefore leave less resources for those in need, which is the opposite of what we are all trying to achieve."

In Amherst's January Report to the Faculty, Amherst officials encouraged the university to increase efforts to attract more [non-whites], as well as to make accommodations to fit them into the student body [while] displacing [white students].

"We recommend that [non-whites] from less affluent backgrounds be more vigorously recruited … and that entering classes be increased by 15-25 students to accommodate these changes," the report said.

Amherst Associate Dean of the Faculty Frederick Griffiths, who also serves on the planning committee that devised the report, stressed that plans are still in the early stages of development, something he said may not be clear in the Business Week article.

"I want to emphasize that this is not fixed yet," he said. "These are just discussions, so things are still under consideration."

Griffiths also said Amherst is investigating ways to increase financial incentives for lower-income, high-achieving students, including increased grants, need-based aid and loan reduction.

Yale has also taken recent steps to diversify its student body, enacting a number of new financial aid reforms to attract [non-whites].

Beginning this academic year, Yale waived the expected family contribution for students on financial aid from families whose annual incomes are $45,000 or less and reduced the contribution for families earning between $45,000 and $60,000. This year, the Admissions Office also launched the Student Ambassadors Program, which sends Yalies to high schools that enroll [non-whites] to publicize the University's financial aid programs.

Yale President Richard Levin [jew alert] said he met with Yale College Council officers Wednesday to discuss how Yalies might get more involved with recruiting high school students from [non-white] areas of the United States.

"The key is how to make students aware of our generous financial aid program," Levin said. "The Ambassadors program is one vehicle. The Web is another."

According to Yale's financial aid Web site, about 40 percent of current undergraduates qualify for financial aid, and the average annual University grant is $22,000.

Despite the changes to financial aid this year, some Yalies said they do not think the University has taken enough steps to effectively attract both low-income [non-whites] and [non-whites] from underrepresented high schools. Members of the Undergraduate Organizing Committee marched from Beinecke Plaza to the Financial Aid Office Tuesday afternoon to protest for further financial aid reform.

"I think that one of the things that we're seeing is that Yale is not a leader right now in terms of financial aid," UOC member Phoebe Rounds '07 said.

This year, the UOC has called for a reduction of the student self-help and summer contribution portions of financial aid and an elimination of the requirement that students receiving University aid also complete work hours.

Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Jeffrey Brenzel [jew alert] said his office is attentive to the University's desire to enroll [non-whites] from lower-income families, and that the Amherst announcement did not escape his notice.

"This is an important subject for Yale, and I read [Business Week's] Amherst piece the other day with interest," Brenzel said. "We are quite interested in diversifying our undergraduate student body further, and we are constantly seeking new and creative ways of doing so, as are many of our peer institutions."

Griffiths said checking out the competition is also common practice in his office.

"Institutions watch each other's practices very closely," Griffiths said. "Admissions is one part of institutional functioning that is cost-competitive, and people watch each others practices to see if things work."

Yale's most recent efforts to attract lower-income [non-whites] include moving from an early decision to an early action program, which Brenzel said enables students to "shop" their financial aid packages.

Marx said he also wants to reach out to [non-whites] who may not have initially considered Amherst. Marx said he recognizes Yale's similar efforts to expand the application pool, and hopes to contribute to the trend of increasing opportunities, but not inter-university competition.

Griffiths said Amherst is currently in the initial stages of a capital campaign to raise funding for the proposed financial aid reforms.

http://www.yaledailynews.com/article.asp?AID=32135
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Old March 8th, 2006 #24
janewhite88
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American college campus = commie jew outpost
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Old March 11th, 2006 #25
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MTU looks to boost diversity

By KAYLA STEWART, Gazette Writer

HOUGHTON - Michele Mahaffy is a hot commodity.
Standing out in a sea of suits and ties at Michigan Tech University's winter career fair last month, the MTU student admitted she's got a good reason for the 128 companies in attendance to take a second look: she's a woman and she wants to be an engineer.

"It's an edge to be working in this field as a female," she said. "I'd like to think that in a perfect world, they wouldn't be hiring me to fill a quota, but I won't complain if they offer me a job."

With 6,138 students enrolled at Tech this year, only 23 percent are women and 15 percent are minorities, the university is scrambling to increase its diversity. Highlighted as a priority in the strategic plan, it's also now marketed differently on the university's Web site and a reason behind handfuls of new degrees, including communication and culture studies, psychology and theater and entertainment technology.

Diversity "is an untapped market" for Tech, said President Glenn Mroz. "There could be a lot more women and minority students here."

Tech is not alone in its diversity struggles.

The University of Michigan School of Engineering boasted almost 5,000 students in the fall of 2005, of which only 25 percent are female and 10 percent are international.

The numbers at the Milwaukee School of Engineering are even lower with 83 percent of their 2,315 undergraduate class males, 17 percent women and 10 percent international students.

Tech increased its international student body by 88 students from last year, but the university is still at work, Mroz said.

Saleha Suleman, the director of International Programs and Services, said in an earlier interview that international students have a hard time getting VISAs to come to the U.S. Trying to recruit international students is not a problem isolated to Tech.

http://www.mininggazette.com/news/st...ew02-n0309.asp
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Old March 11th, 2006 #26
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Diversity' has a variety of meanings

by Letter to the Editor

The big buzzword around campus is now "diversity." Diversity this, diversity that. "Diversity" is on the lips of every administrator and faculty member, it seems.

But what exactly is diversity? Does diversity mean simply getting more non-Caucasian people to attend Ohio University, at the possible expense of lowering the university's arguably already low academic and other standards?

Where does diversity of ideas come into play? Does it even come into play at all? Can a wet-behind-the-ears freshman speak up in a sociology or political science class and give his or her opinion without wondering if what is said will be ridiculed by classmates or shot down by the professor?

My opinion, and feel free to disagree with me if you wish, is that there are many classrooms and lecture halls where open discussion of topics is encouraged, as long as the general consensus jibes with the professor's political or social views.

Is being discriminated against or taunted because of one's beliefs different from being discriminated against or taunted because of one's skin color or background?

Both race and system of belief are parts of what makes every one of us unique. No two people believe exactly the same thing - just as no two people are exactly the same tone of skin.

Diversity comes from within, as well as without. Neglecting to address this inescapable fact will not accomplish a truly diverse campus culture, but one where we are judged by our outside differences, instead of our inner similarities.

http://thepost.baker.ohiou.edu/E.php...E4&date=030906
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Old March 11th, 2006 #27
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Diversity plan enters feedback phase
The University’s revised diversity plan suggests that need-based, department-specific ‘Strategic Action Plans’ be implemented
March 09, 2006

Members of the Diversity Executive Working Group presented the revised draft of the Five Year Diversity Plan to the University Senate Wednesday, and Senate members gave brief comments expressing optimism and a desire for further debate.

“I appreciate the incredible amount of work that has gone into revising this document,” said Brad Shelton, head of the math department. “And more than just the incredible amount of work, but I think the incredible amount of intellectual discourse that’s gone into creating this document.”

Charles Martinez, vice provost for Institutional Equity and Diversity, and Gordon Hall, the work group’s co-chair, presented the revised plan, based on a sharply criticized document originally released in May 2005.

In a major revision, the draft removes specific departmental requirements and instead makes general suggestions for departments to create their own “Strategic Action Plans” deciding the specifics of implementation based on the needs of the department.

Martinez said the purpose of the plan is to empower departments that ultimately are the best at “understanding the unique challenges in those contexts,” rather than set mandates and be prescriptive.

“That shift is important, because on the one hand you could say without prescriptions it’s vague and meaningless,” he said. On the other hand, he said, the plan asks the University to make changes where it will matter most.

Departments’ strategic action plans are to be submitted to the provost and to the Office of Institutional Equity and Diversity, which is subordinate to the Office of the Provost, whose central purpose is the creation, development and implementation of the diversity plan.

Every five years, department and University plans will be subject to a full review, with campus climate surveys conducted every two years to assess the success of the strategic action plans.

Other plan revisions include avoiding the use of the contentious phrase “cultural competency.” The draft addresses the word’s controversy and provides a snapshot of the current campus.

“(Cultural competence) should not connote a dichotomy, the idea that a person is either culturally competent or incompetent, but rather that all of us can seek to become more culturally competent,” according to the diversity plan.

Martinez said that the work group reasoned the discussion of cultural competency, rather than a firm definition, will lead to an understanding of the term.

“We couldn’t get past the phrase, no matter how you described it,” Martinez said. “For us to get to a common ground took a lot of conversation.

“That conversation, that process,” he added, “is not something you can capture in a written document.”

Math professor Huaxin Lin questioned how the plan addresses groups that are “over-represented” in the University’s population.

“Is it the intention, or purpose, of this plan to reduce the representation of those groups who are over-represented? If it is, I would like it to state it in the document,” he said. “If it is not the purpose of this plan, then I want it unambiguously stated that there is no intention or purpose to reduce the representation of groups who are represented.”

Martinez said Lin presented a critical point and that his comments will be addressed in future discussions.

“I don’t think there’s a litmus test of representativeness, as if you arrived at this point you’re done, and if you’ve got too many, you’ve to start pulling back. I don’t think that’s the spirit of this at all, and that may need to be spelled out much more explicitly,” he said.

http://www.dailyemerald.com/vnews/di.../440fe82ce7512
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Old March 11th, 2006 #28
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Revised diversity plan encourages diverse approaches

03/09/2006

Associated Press

A new draft of the University of Oregon's five-year diversity plan eliminates language that would have made "cultural competency" an issue in hiring and promotion.

The new document, presented to the UO Senate this week, also substitutes specific diversity requirements with broader language and gives individual campus divisions the flexibility to draft their own diversity plans.

Diversity has been a campus topic for years, with some saying the issue gets too much attention and others saying it doesn't get enough.

The first draft of the diversity plan got plenty of publicity last May, when its focus on cultural competency — the ability to successfully work with people from all backgrounds — made national news and spread widely among conservative pundits. The plan called for hiring up to 40 faculty members by 2012 to teach courses in a "cluster" of diversity-related topics, including race, gender, gay and disability studies as well as setting aside more financial aid for students from "underrepresented" backgrounds.

Psychology professor Gordon Hall, co-chair of the committee that developed the revision, said the latest blueprint recognizes that different departments need different approaches to achieve diversity.

"In other words, one size doesn't fit all," he said. "This new draft allows more tailoring and flexibility in particular units and colleges with respect to these issues."

But that flexibility is likely to concern those who saw the original draft as a stronger tool for meeting the administration's pledge of creating a "caring, supportive atmosphere on campus."

UO President Dave Frohnmayer, in a letter accompanying the draft plan, acknowledges the difficulty of finding consensus: "I acknowledge that virtually every reader is likely to have some disagreement with the final proposal."

The revision keeps the six major themes of the old plan: developing a culturally responsive community, improving campus climate, building a critical mass, expanding and filling the pipeline, developing and strengthening community linkages and developing and reinforcing diversity infrastructure.

The plan also makes a number of suggestions, such as training programs, hiring efforts and adapting course content and student evaluations.

Though most professors haven't had time to digest the document, early comments suggest it won't be as controversial as the last one.

But UO chemistry professor Michael Kellman said it's still centered on different treatment for particular groups.

"This plan is still obsessed with group identity; it's still full of group preferences in scholarships and faculty hiring," he said. "I think those things are bad public policy so I object to the plan on those grounds."

Some students see it another way. Adam Walsh, the UO student body president, said there is concern about the time line for developing plans and the fact that no money was allocated for the effort.

"A lot of the students were not thrilled with everything they saw," Walsh said. "It's somewhat wait and see how the administration will respond to some of these concerns."

http://www.kgw.com/sharedcontent/APS...D8G7U9484.html
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