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Old February 16th, 2006 #1
Agis
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CU Launches Program To Improve Campus Diversity
Jan 31, 2006

(CBS4) BOULDER, Colo. The University of Colorado in Boulder launched a pilot program to enhance diversity after a string of racial incidents on campus.

CU's chancellor, Phil DiStefano, told a crowd of faculty and staff about a new course called CU 101 where students are to learn more about values and goals of diversity.

Unlike any other course on the Boulder campus, CU 101 aims to teach tolerance.

"What we do at orientation is not enough," DiStefano said.

He said the class is just one initiative the school is launching in response to several high profile racist incidents over the last year.

"Listening to students who have been through racist incidents, I think will just raise the level of awareness and sensitivity for all of our students," DiStefano said.

The program will start in the dorms with 1,000 freshmen.

"So students would be meeting with faculty in the evening, talking about issues of race, diversity and ethnicity," DiStefano said.

Freshman Dorcas Okine said it may improve CU's image, but isn't convinced it will improve campus climate.

"I think it's a good idea," Okine said. "I'm very skeptical because I think tolerance is learned at home."

"When it comes down to it, you have to engage people on a one on one basis and that means getting ethnic minorities on campus," said senior Paul Pukurdpol.

DiStefano said improving diversity is the highest priority, but the students on campus can and must do better.

"CU cannot and will not tolerate this hateful behavior," DiStefano said.

CU president Hank Brown formed a commission to study diversity on campus.

Congressman Mark Udall has offered to help the commission. In a letter to Brown, Udall said on-campus programs alone can't address the problem.

The congressman said the community must also do more to create a welcoming atmosphere.

http://cbs4denver.com/local/local_story_031215129.html
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Old February 16th, 2006 #2
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From 'Minority' to 'Diversity'
February 3, 2006


Francesca P. Rothenbacher [-ed jew alert] hesitates to even discuss the hot-button issue of affirmative action. She says she was not out to prove a point when she sought admission, as a white woman, to an on-campus summer enrichment program previously advertised as reserved for black, Hispanic, or American Indian students.

A biology major, Ms. Rothenbacher says she applied to the research in science and engineering program, jointly operated here each summer by Rutgers University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, because "I just wanted to further my career. That is the most important thing to me."

Regardless of her intentions, Ms. Rothenbacher, a senior at Delaware State University, is one of many white or Asian-American students around the nation who are profoundly changing the complexion of college programs that had been established for members of other racial and ethnic groups.

Over the last three years, mainly in response to two landmark U.S. Supreme Court rulings in June 2003 that defined the limits of affirmative action, colleges across the country have been concluding that they are in legal jeopardy if they continue to offer services or benefits solely to minority students. As a result, the institutions have been abandoning the use of race-exclusive eligibility criteria in determining who can be awarded scholarships and fellowships or can participate in recruitment, orientation, and academic-enrichment programs [-ed whites are 'free' to take divershitty training at their own expense].

http://www.civilrights.org/issues/af...s.cfm?id=40055
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Old February 16th, 2006 #3
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Leaders discuss diversity
January 31, 2006.


Four Front co-chairwoman Jackie Cook-Eberle shares her concerns at a Missouri Students Association diversity forum on Friday. Some of the issues discussed included possible improvements to Verge’N*shit, the MSA diversity publication, as well as the addition of a diversity course to the MU curriculum.



A required course on different cultures and diversifying the Missouri Students Association Senate were just a few topics discussed Friday during MSA President John Andersen’s meeting with diversity leaders on campus. The meeting served as a launching pad for Andersen’s diversity platform.

Andersen said the meeting helped him determine how he wants to work on certain diversity issues, including forming the direction of Verge’N magazine, supporting an optional diversity course, setting the duties for the new director of diversity affairs and keeping the lines of communication open between all organizations.

In attendance were three MSA executives and seven student leaders from minority organizations, many of whom voiced concerns about the vacant Multicultural Issues Committee chairperson position in the MSA Senate.

MSA Senate Speaker Davie Holt said he is interviewing people interested in the position, but there is no formal application process to go with the position.

“An application process would make it more serious for even the individuals who apply because they have to put in that extra effort,” Four Front Co-Chairwoman Jackie Cook-Eberle said. Four Front is the umbrella organization for some of the minority groups on campus.

Cook-Eberle said MSA needs to have more diversity. She said she disliked that most of Andersen’s choices for his executive cabinet were male.

“You gain from having people from all different backgrounds around and not just your friends,” Cook-Eberle said.

She also recommended that there be mentors available for new senators. She said executives should visit minority organization meetings to recruit senators.

“It takes an effort to put your foot in the door and really understand Senate,” MSA Vice President Brooke Moody said.

Holt encouraged those in attendance to tell anyone they could to join Senate and said senators are not elected officials.

The group also discussed ideas about Verge’N*shit magazine, MSA’s diversity publication, which opened up discussion about other diversity publications on campus, including the Legion of Black Collegians’ The TRUTH and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People’s Minority Report. [-ed luving the dievershitty]

Andersen said he has no problem with MSA’s magazine being provocative and sees the upcoming issue on stereotypes as just that.

Despite the large number of requested changes to MSA, at the end of the meeting, many in attendance thanked Andersen for giving them the opportunity for open discussion.

“This is the first time an administration has sat down with all the minority groups,” said Pablo Mendoza, director of the Multicultural Center.

http://www.themaneater.com/article.php?id=23086
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Last edited by Agis; February 16th, 2006 at 05:09 AM.
 
Old February 16th, 2006 #4
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Events Educate About Diversity
Posted 02.01.06

As part of Wesleyan's on-going efforts to provide staff education dedicated to diversity issues, the Office of Affirmative Action is sponsoring a workshop, "Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in the Academic Workplace,” on Feb. 9.

The workshop will be offered twice: at 9:30 a.m. in the Russell House, and at 1:30 p.m. in Woodhead Lounge. Each session meets for two hours and 15 minutes.

“This workshop will provide frameworks for understanding sexual orientation and gender identity in a more integrated way and offer participants in-community perspectives on work-related issues,” explains Michael Benn, interim director of Affirmative Action.

The workshop will be conducted by Dorothea Brauer, director of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning & Ally Services, Diversity & Equity at the University of Vermont.

Topics of discussion will include lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender civil rights, same-sex marriages versus civil unions, benefits and family configurations.


[-ed on the downlow]

Participants will have opportunities to work with language and terminology and become more culturally competent and confident that their workplace conversations are respectful and inclusive.

Wesleyan’s revised and expanded policy on discrimination and harassment can be found online at http://www.wesleyan.edu/affirm/policy_harassment.html.

Space is limited to 30 participants per workshop. For more information or to register e-mail Janice Watson at [email protected] or call 860-685-2006.

http://www.wesleyan.edu/newsletter/c...6aaseries.html
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Old February 16th, 2006 #5
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Diversity Festival Offers a Taste (and Sights and Sounds) of Our World
Jan. 31, 2006

LEXINGTON, Ky. − New events and returning favorites highlight this year’s Cultural Diversity Festival, Feb. 13-28, one of the year’s most popular events among faculty, staff and students at the University of Kentucky.

The Cultural Diversity Festival is known for its international foods, colorful entertainment, films, exhibits, concerts, plays, recitals, an international talent night, and stimulating cross-cultural lectures, forums and workshops. Visit the expanded schedule of events online for a complete list of all 36 activities associated with the campuswide, two-week celebration of diversity.

The Cultural Diversity Festival Kickoff will be held at two locations and times – at 11:30 a.m. Feb. 13 at Worsham Theater in the Student Center and at 3 p.m. Feb. 13 in 201 College of Nursing. In addition to free snacks with a Mexican theme and information about other festival activities, this year’s kickoff event features a performance of vignettes focusing on cultural diversity by Sane and Sober Theater Communications, a theater-based training company that combines facts and information with comedic and dramatic vignettes to motivate audiences toward solutions. The event is free and open to the public.

The wildly popular Taste of Our World features an expanded menu of 23 foods and drinks from around the world, including Caramel Rum Bananas from Australia, Madagascar Chicken from Africa, Apfaelstreudel from Austria, Edamame from Japan, and Hot Browns from Central Kentucky. The affordable smorgasbord of epicurean delights – with international entertainment and exhibits – is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 15 in the Student Center Grand Ballroom. The foods will be prepared and presented by UK Catering Services. Tickets are 50 cents each; each ticket purchases an individual sample of a dish. The Plus Account will be accepted, and the first 300 students to attend will receive a free T-shirt.

Diversity Through Our Eyes, a unique exhibit of photographs taken by UK students, faculty and staff, will travel to different locations around campus after its opening Feb. 15 at Taste of Our World. For more information, contact Karen Slaymaker at 257-4067.

Abigail Stewart of the University of Michigan will discuss Faculty Diversity Recruitment at 9 a.m. Feb. 17 in the Center Theater of the Student Center. Then on Feb. 28, Bob Bontrager, assistant provost for enrollment management at Oregon State University, will speak about issues related to recruiting a diverse student body.

International Talent Night is slated at 7 p.m. Feb. 17 in Memorial Hall, and UK Students on Rupp, a discussion scheduled at noon Feb. 16 in UK’s Martin Luther King Jr. Cultural Center, will be moderated by the center’s director Ricardo Nazario-Colon.

http://news.uky.edu/news/display_art...y=64&artid=960
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Old February 16th, 2006 #6
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Diversity Indoctrination
January 31, 2006

College students today inevitably find themselves surrounded by the latest fad in academia: diversity education. This academic revolution permeates universities, ranging from freshman orientation programs to “minority perspective” history courses. Fittingly, my first academic experience at Brown University was focused on diversity and multiculturalism. In the excitement of orientation, I unsuspectingly signed up for Building Understanding Across Differences (BUAD), Brown University’s freshman orientation “diversity program.” A discussion of issues relating to “differing social identities related to race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ability, and class” seemed intriguing.

Prior to any discussion of the issues, we were instructed by the faculty leader of the program that if we are hurt by anyone’s comments or feel uncomfortable in any way, we should immediately “raise our hand and say ‘OUCH.” At this point, the discussion will be stopped, and the student will share his/her feelings on the matter. When I noticed that I was the only one in the room laughing at this instruction, I recognized that it was not intended to be a joke. Though it seemed childish, I figured that maybe it was not such a bad rule. Maybe certain guidelines were needed to control extremists and racists, so that the rest of us could discuss such sensitive issues meaningfully.

After watching a Katie Couric documentary that explored the widespread bigotry and racism of America, I raised my hand to argue that racial profiling, in certain instances, can make our country safer. (It’s no secret that while most Muslims are not terrorists, most terrorists are Muslims.) Immediately, several students raised their hands and yelled “OUCH.” [-ed this must be somekind of nigger euphemism] I was “OUCHed” again a few moments later when I suggested that Affirmative Action causes less qualified minorities to be admitted over other white and Asian applicants. After I was promptly silenced, I was assured by a fellow BUAD member that despite Affirmative Action, minorities at Brown, on average, have grades just as high as other applicants. It was at this point that it hit me: I was the racist, extremist, bigot that the OUCH rule was intended to quash. Of course, it was nothing against me personally. In fact, being a minority myself [-ed hence why this opinon is important], I was considered to be part of the family until I had given my opinion. Rather, BUAD objected to the fact that I had broken the unstated rule. I had dared to utter an opinion that did not fall in line with the politically correct, self-victimization rhetoric that fuels the fire of diversity education. I resisted the inherent political agenda of the program, seen in their propensity to stir up blatantly anti-American thinking. The premise of BUAD is clear: America is a racist, elitist, homophobic, misogynistic nation. No mention was given to the fact that America was built on the principles of liberty and transformed itself into the most inclusive, egalitarian nation in the world.



While it is easy to shrug off BUAD and other “diversity” programs as nothing more than laughable examples of far-left multiculturalism at work, the long term consequences of this university-funded asininity threaten the integrity of academic inquiry. In truth, BUAD, like diversity programs in schools across the country, are not interested in actually “increasing understanding and dialogue among students of differing social identities related to race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ability, and class.” This is simply a front for promoting a fiercely political agenda. Since indoctrination is incompatible with free speech and honest debate, diversity programs deliberately engage in censorship and race-conscious rhetoric. Ironically, these are precisely the root causes of the culture that diversity education claims to counter, this being, an environment of ignorance, self-victimization, and division on campus.

Moreover, if the best colleges and universities of our nation continue to create a generation of leaders who do not believe [-ed yadayadayada] in the democratic principles of America, they have failed in their core missions to build a society in which all members can assimilate fairly and equally. It is time for academia to abandon the sham they call diversity education and return to the virtues of a classical liberal education. Only an education that is politically neutral, yet strongly rooted in the ideals of freedom, equality, and a vigorous pursuit of absolute truth can provide students with the college education they deserve.

http://www.frontpagemag.com/Articles...e.asp?ID=21098
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Old February 16th, 2006 #7
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Diversity reigns with The Color Orange
Written by Ryli Hennessey -Argonaut
31 January 2006

Diversity issues will have the floor at Thursday’s The Color Orange performance. The Color Orange, a hip-hop, spoken word and lecture trio, comprises Mohammed Bilal, Josh Goldstein and Melinda Crozan Foley. Bilal is best known for his role in the MTV series “The Real World.”

At 7 p.m. in the Student Union Building Ballroom, Bilal and Goldstein will perform “10 Tools for Open Interaction,” a piece that tries to help give the audience the skills to interact and talk to people of different races, cultures and backgrounds. When Bilal and Goldstein came up with the piece, they tried to think about how they became friends.

When they first met, they seemed different — “A short white Jewish young man and a big black Muslim kid,” Bilal said.
They tried to think of what served as the foundation of their friendship. Music and hip-hop, their common interests, brought them together.

“If we can be friends for 15 years, pretty much anyone can,” Goldstein said.
Bilal has a master’s in diversity studies and tries to merge the things he has learned with his music, including content about ethnicity, gender and sexuality.

Bilal said The Color Orange tries to take all of the jargon about race, religion and other diversity issues and filter it down into something that is visceral.
“We try to keep the corny factor down,” Goldstein said.

Goldstein said that he knows lecturers can often times be dry, but the members of The Color Orange bring themselves and their experiences to the table.
“We’re doing hip-hop music that I think a lot of kids will like,” Goldstein said.
They try to keep it fun, funny, interesting and unique. Goldstein said they put all of their experiences on the line, whether they are good or bad.

“We present it in a very personal way that’s very engaging,” he said.
Crozan Foley will be performing a few spoken word pieces about topics such as gender and what Bilal calls “womanism.”

The winner of the University of Idaho Poetry Slam, senior horticulture major Libby Driebergen, will open for The Color Orange. “I’m all for it. There’s nothing like local talent,” Bilal said. Bilal offered some advice for young poets.

He said to be as descriptive as possible, “meaning to watch the blades of grass and try to describe them in as many different ways as you can and bring that into your emotional description,” he said. “If poetry isn’t emotive, then what’s the point?”

Bilal has been writing since he was about 11. He had a great aunt with whom he stayed during the summers and to whom he became very close. When she died, he was so upset he couldn’t go to the funeral.

“I sat down and wrote my first poem. It was dedicated to her,” Bilal said. “And from then on I’ve been writing poetry.”
Nathan Hand, coordinator of student activities and leadership, said the group is different from most acts that come to the UI.

He said The Color Orange is interested in what students have to say about the issues it discusses. The group will attend classes and talk with students.
“I think it should be a good follow up to the poetry slam,” Hand said.

http://www.argonaut.uidaho.edu/content/view/1082/47/
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Old February 16th, 2006 #8
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Diversity Dialogue gets Tempe citizens talking
by Sonu Munshi
January 31, 2006

A high-school student, an accountant and a University faculty associate -- all from different ethnic backgrounds -- are among a group of 20 Tempe residents looking to spend seven evenings together.

That's the group dynamic that Tempe has put together for its annual Diversity Dialogue.

This year's first session kicked off Wednesday at the Tempe Public Library. Residents interested in the Tempe community volunteered to share their experiences and discuss issues concerning them and the city.

The program was established through the Tempe Human Relations Commission in 1999.

"The commission wanted to encourage understanding of diversity among residents," said Tempe Human Relations Commissioner Gail Paredes-Ewen.

"People can get rid of stereotypes about different communities by actually interacting with some of their members," she said.

At the end of the seven weekly sessions, the group's recommendations will be presented to the City Council.

Colleen Byron, a doctoral student and faculty associate at ASU's School of Public Affairs, is a first-time participant. She said she's there because it's not just the right thing to do, but also the smart thing to do.

"Homogeneousness sucks!" Byron said. "The quality of the decisions people make as a diverse group is infinitely better than by those thinking along the same lines and therefore having tunnel vision."

Vanessa Trinidad is another participant in the dialogues. The 16-year-old student at Marcos de Niza High School moved to Arizona from the Dominican Republic with her parents 10 years ago.

"I'd like to learn from others' experiences, especially those who've come from different countries," Trinidad said.

Tempe resident Rhonda Shrourou, 43, is a regular participant in the dialogues.

"I joined this program hoping to teach other people around me, but I ended up finding out more about other people - how certain words are offensive to people or certain expressions," she said.

Paredes-Ewen said that the emphasis this time is on involving the youth and also extending the number of sessions "to add to the comfort level for discussions."

"Sometimes people don't open up easily, so as facilitators we have to try and encourage them to express their thoughts and ideas," she said.

Tempe Councilman Ben Arredondo welcomed the group during its first meeting.

"Think of the best salad you've tasted," he said. "It's only when all ingredients are mixed that it tastes great. That's what you all represent."

The program is sponsored by the city's Diversity Office, ASU's Intergroup Relations Center and the Friends of the Tempe Public Library.

The IRC trains facilitators and also helps with the initial logistics. Thomas Walker, assistant director at the IRC, said that it's a great opportunity for ASU to build relationships with the outside community.

Paredes-Ewen said past discussions have included topics such as illegal immigration, changing neighborhood demographics and English language learning in schools.

Such issues are critical in an increasingly diverse environment, especially after a racial discrimination lawsuit came to light in Tempe's Public Works Department in 2002.

Following an audit, the Diversity Office was set up later that year.

"As long as you have diversity of people, there will be diversity of thought," said Tempe's Diversity Director Rosa Inchausti. "We have done many things internally -- put in checks and balances -- but there's definitely scope to improve."

She said that programs like the Diversity Dialogue help to further understanding.

"Barriers are broken when you understand the core of an individual," Inchausti said. "That's the beauty of a program like this."

Hispanics, Asians, African-Americans and American Indians make up more than a quarter of Tempe's population, according to the 2000 census on the Diversity Office's Web site.

"I hope people get challenged and leave with more good questions than they came with, " Walker said.

Reach the reporter at [email protected].

http://www.asuwebdevil.com/issues/20...31/news/695481
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Old February 16th, 2006 #9
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Resident assistant promotes diversity

By Susannah Gregg

January 31, 2006
Most people think in stereotypes.

Tabitha Williams, a resident assistant at USM's Jones Hall, tried to address stereotypes arising in different scenarios and promote diversity at USM Thursday night in a program entitled, Bicurious, Bisexual and Bilingual.

The crowd was mixed, but the topics discussed centered around perceptions of others based on preconceived notions about dress, behavior and sexual connation.

“We categorize people based on our background and culture. I want to try not to continue our stereotypes and be aware that other types of people do exist,” said Williams.

Williams asked students what they thought about certain situations based on what they believed, and then she changed aspects of the situation to see if there were double standards - and there were.

For example, the use of illicit material for males was considered to be typical, but the idea of women behaving this way was not condoned. Williams said these types of judgmental attitudes are what lead to stereotypes, double standards and decrease understanding.

“I feel we shouldn't judge people based on how they look, act or dress,” said LaTara Hudson, a freshman computer engineering major. “I do feel that stereotypes are expressed here on campus.”

Hudson said people might look at a girl who is into sports and label her a lesbian, or they may see a feminine-acting guy and assume he is a homosexual. But, no one even bothers to get to know them.

“The program was pretty good,” said Courtney Smith, a junior bioscience major. “You just shouldn't judge anybody at all.”

Williams described a bi-curious individual as someone who is curious or has sexual thoughts about a person of the same sex; a person who is bisexual is someone attracted to both men and women; and she used the word bilingual as an example of how we speak differently around different people.

Williams said her overall goal was to explore diversity and address different issues on campus through education and programming.

http://www.studentprintz.com/vnews/d.../43def0b55c7aa
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Old February 16th, 2006 #10
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Delta College's new president calls for excellence, diversity
Monday, January 30, 2006

Diversity, technology and a focus on students are some of the priorities Delta College President Jean J. Goodnow listed for the community college at her inauguration ceremony on Sunday.

''Delta College will serve as a model for all community colleges,'' said Goodnow, 57, who came to Delta last summer from her post as president of Illinois Valley Community College in Oglesby.

Goodnow succeeds former Delta President Peter D. Boyse. She began at Delta on July 1 with an annual salary and benefits package of $217,000.

In her inaugural address, Goodnow called for ''self-imposed, rigorous'' standards to account for instructional and service quality, continuous computer and technology upgrades and more diversity among employees.

''The value of diversity is the core of the community college mission,'' she said. The college should take measures, she said, to ensure that ''the profile of our employees, across all divisions, reflects the community we serve.''

The sounds of Broadway and bagpipes rang in the college's fourth presidency, with musicians performing ''Consider Yourself'' from the musical ''Oliver'' and ''Amazing Grace.'' Students from the speech department recited a history of Delta College and its context in national history from the 1960s to the present.

Robert B. Stafford, college trustee and a member of the presidential search committee that picked Goodnow, called the college one of the only true collaborations between Bay, Midland and Saginaw counties. Stafford said the committee took pains to ensure the distinct character of each place wasn't lost on the selected candidates.

''(Goodnow) was the individual we felt could best understand and facilitate the relationship between our communities,'' he said.

Goodnow was president at Illinois Valley from 1996 to 2005. Before that, she had administrative roles at three other community colleges, as well as teaching and counseling positions.

She received a doctorate in higher education administration in 1980 from the University of Iowa. She also received master's and bachelor's degrees at Iowa.

http://www.mlive.com/news/bctimes/in...390.xml&coll=4
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Old February 16th, 2006 #11
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FRIENDS CELEBRATES DIVERSITY
Ethnic, religious and economic diversity highlighted during February

Friends University's Center for Student Success has lined up a month of lectures, interactive experiences and field trips to celebrate and bring attention to diversity on our campus and around the world. During Diversity Month, Friends challenges participants to broaden their minds and spice up their lives.

Candlelight Hate Crime Vigil
: The Friends community unites to promote hope, tolerance and understanding as we remember victims of hate crimes. Join us as we celebrate diversity with prayers, poetry and music by candlelight. 8 to 9 p.m. Feb. 1 at Rose Window Plaza (event will be moved inside Davis Hall in the case of bad weather)

Bread of Life (Campus Ministries Service Project): We feed the hungry in the spirit of giving. It's servant leadership at its best. To sign up, contact Carrie Mills at [email protected] or (316) 295-5746. 1 to 4 p.m. Feb. 2 and Feb. 16

Hunger Banquet: Hunger is not about food. It's about power. This high-energy interactive event gives audience members a metaphorical glimpse at how food and other resources are inequitably distributed throughout the world. Cost is $1 or one canned food item for students, and $2 or two canned food items for faculty and staff. Food will be provided, and admission is limited to the first 100 people to RSVP. Please RSVP to CSS at (316) 295-5832. Cash and nonperishable food donations are welcomed at this event. 6 to 8 p.m. Feb. 8 in the Casado Atrium.

13th Annual Jazz Festival: Click here for more details. Feb. 10-11

Cornerstone: Join the Friends University community for a campus worship service. Click here for more information. 8 p.m. Feb. 1, Feb. 19 and Feb. 26 in the Casado Dining Hall

Oxfam Collegiate Click Drive: Helping the world's hungry is just a click away. Visit PovertyFighters.com, use the drop-down menu to choose Friends University and click the DONATE AND WIN button. That's it. No credit card, no money out of your pocket. With each click, Oxfam will make a 25-cent donation toward feeding the world's hungry in our University's name. Each person can do this twice a day. Feb. 13 to March 31

Mix It Up: Diversity Dining Luncheon: Savor the flavors of the world. Everyone is welcome, even if you don't have a meal plan. 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Feb. 22 in the Casado Cafeteria

Get the Most Out of Campus Diversity: Motivational speaker extraordinaire Matt Glowacki will help us celebrate our diversity. 7 p.m. Feb. 22 in Alexander Auditorium

Field Trip: Join us on a road trip to a local synogogue to learn about the Jewish religion and worship styles. Students who are interested can sign up in the Center for Student Success office in the Casado Student Center. Signup will begin on Feb. 25 10 a.m. to noon Feb. 28
Media Contact(s):
Friends University
2100 W. University
Wichita, KS
(316) 295-5000

http://www.friends.edu/news/news_detail.asp?id=961
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Old February 16th, 2006 #12
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I wonder when they will offer a degree in diversity. Let us drink a sad toast to the coming 'dark ages'.
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Old February 16th, 2006 #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janewhite88
I wonder when they will offer a degree in diversity. Let us drink a sad toast to the coming 'dark ages'.
While we force extra classes in diversity the Chinks and Dotheads are tripping over each other getting engineering degrees.
While they are cornering the pharmaceutical global market, we'll be taking "consideration classes" for homos and baboons with AIDs and paying for their meds with our tax dollars (assuming we still have any jobs left).
Un-fucking-believable.
 
Old February 17th, 2006 #14
kywhiskeyrebel
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What a sad waste of resources, tuition money, taxes, etc. Does any right minded White need a class on faggot relations and how to deal "sensetivly" with them?? Well, a girl I work with said she had to take a class about this trash in order to get her degree in education.
Pretty pathetic when a college's monetary supporters are more interested in throwing scholarship money to a nigger to catch a ball or run fast than to a bright White academian. As the previous poster said, no wonder many muds are stomping us in the sciences.
Homeschooling for any children I (hopefully will) father!!!

14/88
 
Old February 17th, 2006 #15
Dirk Kensington
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Its time to carefully rise from your chair in the assembly on diversity and slink slowly towards the only exit where you light a matchbook and toss it into a trash bin then slip outside and wedge a chair up against the handles.
 
Old February 17th, 2006 #16
hachiko
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kywhiskeyrebel
What a sad waste of resources, tuition money, taxes, etc. Does any right minded White need a class on faggot relations and how to deal "sensetivly" with them?? Well, a girl I work with said she had to take a class about this trash in order to get her degree in education.
Pretty pathetic when a college's monetary supporters are more interested in throwing scholarship money to a nigger to catch a ball or run fast than to a bright White academian. As the previous poster said, no wonder many muds are stomping us in the sciences.
Homeschooling for any children I (hopefully will) father!!!

14/88
Couldn't agree with you more on the homeschooling; but I believe I've read somewhere here that "sensitivity" and "diversity" related studies will be required even for homeschooled children.
This whole shitty situation is like the "doublethink" principle of 1984. You stress open-mindedness by recognizing people are something different before you make sure to treat them the same and pretend to have never noticed they were different.
No wonder the amount of kids on anti-depressants is staggering!
And yes, college backers will continue to throw money to the fastest buck nigger who can bounce an orange ball and yet turn a blind eye to that same baboon mounting his daughter nightly...
Our land is in a dire predicament. There is no escape but to cut out the cancer. It only takes one small sharp knife to cut out a large tumor...
 
Old February 17th, 2006 #17
Dirk Kensington
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Silence is Consent
 
Old February 18th, 2006 #18
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Agis, you made 11 posts about diversity being forced on college students and the general population.

Are you to trying to show us that there is a nationwide push to indoctrinate people to accept social destruction in the name of 'diversity' ? Almost like some hidden hand was at work, steering the nation toward the rocks of destruction .
 
Old February 19th, 2006 #19
Oy Ze Hate
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Kill 'em all. Let God sort 'em out.

Just be sure to use a variety of weapons.

Now that's what I call diversity.
 
Old March 7th, 2006 #20
Agis
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Sharpton to discuss racism in Boulder
His appearance tonight at CU coincides with local diversity concerns.


When the Rev. Al Sharpton arrives on the University of Colorado at Boulder campus tonight for a speech, he will likely provide one more indication that CU and Boulder are fast developing reputations as symbols of racial division.

Sharpton, founder of the National Action Network and a forceful voice in the dialogue on race relations, is aware of recent problems with race and diversity in Boulder and at CU, his spokeswoman said.

He plans to address those issues - which have included racist e-mail, racist fliers and a possibly race-related attack on a CU student, as well as concern for the lack of minority students - in his speech, she said.

This comes a week after CU interim chancellor Phil DiStefano directly acknowledged the university's negative reputation on diversity during a state-of-the-campus speech.

For Boulder and CU, the emerging reputation takes a hacksaw to the two communities' long-standing reputations as bastions of tolerance and liberalism. But those most active in the debate in Boulder disagree over to what extent the perception of Boulder as a racist place accurately describes the problem.

"You can't just make that generalization," said Karen Shimamoto, a CU junior who is director of diversity for the student government and a member of a blue-ribbon commission at CU studying diversity issues. "However, a certain number of people actually do feel unsafe in Boulder, and they have every right to."

Shimamoto said the lack of diversity - this fall, only about 4,000 of the more than 28,000 students enrolled at CU were minorities - is a serious problem, and she said CU's administration must work quickly to make the campus environment more welcoming to minority students.

Rob Smoke, chairman of Boulder's Human Relations Commission, said Boulder's problems lie less in overt racism than in gentrification that keeps poorer people out of the city. Boulder, he said, has never been very racially diverse. And with the median home price now around $460,000, it won't become so anytime soon.

"I think there's a lot of people who try hard here, but the reality is that this is just not a community that functions with a lot of racial diversity," Smoke said.

CU alumna Jessica Peck Corry, director of the conservative Independence Institute's Campus Accountability Project and a member of the blue-ribbon commission, said CU and Boulder are getting bad raps.

"I think what's going on with this campus situation is that the Boulder community and the campus specifically is letting a few bigots define the campus environment, which is truly progressive, open-minded and fair," she said. "The majority of the CU campus is not racist."

http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_3485932
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