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Old September 23rd, 2013 #1
Alex Linder
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This will be a forum for everything related to the surname Linder. Feel free to make your own threads with your own names and family histories.
 
Old September 23rd, 2013 #2
Alex Linder
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What I'm going to quote comes from my uncle's book, The Linder Sourcebook: Origins, Distribution and Immigrants, by Harold Linder (2004).

I had dinner with my uncle last night, and he told me that 10% of those with the name 'Linder' are jews. For the morons, I'll do the math: NINETY PERCENT OF PEOPLE NAMED LINDER ARE NOT JEWS.

Oh wait. That ten percent is actually smaller because it includes English with the name and blacks named Linder.

So the percentage of Linders who are jews is < 10%.

..."I speculate that ultimate Linder origins for the world are:

Switzerland 50%
Germany 25%
Sweden 15%
Jewish, England, Black 10%"

(p. 4)

Quote:
The surname Linder is somewhat unusual because it appears to have originated independently in three different language areas: Switzerland-Germany, Sweden and England. The common denominator, of course, is the widespread occurrence of the linden tree.

Before the common use of surnames, people were identified by first names, and if further distinction was necessary, their name might be qualified by location, occupation or some personal characteristic. Thus a person who lived near a linden tree might be called John "de la Linda" (by the linden). Still later, precursor names are found, such as John "dictus Linder" (called Linder). These names were probably not hereditary, but in time the simple Linder surname became more common. The Linder surname in southern Germany and Switzerland appears in the 1300's and seems to be generally hereditary by 1350 or 1400.
Quote:
D. Where and When Did Linders Originate?

There now appear to be 10 independent origins of the Linder surname that produced Linder lines. This is only a first estimate because some of the apparent independent origins may eventually prove to be related. On the other hand, some of the apparent independent origins may prove to have had multiple origins.

Independent Origins of the Surname Linder

Switzerland.........................4
Saanen, Zurich, Bern, Basel
Germany.............................2
Stuttgart, Kaufbeuren
England..............................1
Sweden..............................1
Jewish................................1
Black..................................1

The Swedish, Jewish and Black lines are relatively recent, probably mostly after 1700, and are discussed below under major Linder lines. The following discussion refers only to English, German and Swiss lines, which were well established in the 1400's.

I assembled a chronological list of over 300 references to the earliest Linders, from 1267 to 1600, from various publications of tax, property and public records from England, Germany and Switzerland. The earliest names, up to 1350, are precursor names such as "genant Linder" (known as Linder). Most people after 1350 have a first name and the surname Linder, which was probably heridary.

It should be noted that distances in Europe are not great. Almost all of the Linders treated here lived within a maximum area of about 250-km by 250-km (150 miles by 150 miles), from Stuttgart, Germany in the north to Saanen, Switzerland in the south and from Basel, Switzerland in the west to Reutte, Austria in the east. This area is slightly smaller than West Virginia. Most people in this period, 1200 to 1600, probably never traveled far from their homes. (pp. 5-6)

Last edited by Alex Linder; September 23rd, 2013 at 12:54 PM.
 
Old September 23rd, 2013 #3
Alex Linder
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The name Linder comes from the linden tree.



Tilia is a genus of about 30 species of trees native throughout most of the temperate Northern Hemisphere. Commonly called lime trees in the British Isles, they are not closely related to the lime fruit. Other names include linden and basswood. The genus occurs in Europe and eastern North America, but the greatest species diversity is found in Asia. Under the Cronquist classification system, this genus was placed in the family Tiliaceae, but genetic research by the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group has resulted in the incorporation of this genus into the Malvaceae. Tilia species are mostly large, deciduous trees, reaching typically 20 to 40 metres (66 to 130 ft) tall, with oblique-cordate leaves 6 to 20 centimetres (2 to 8 in) across. As with elms, the exact number of species is uncertain, as many if not most of the species will hybridise readily, both in the wild and in cultivation. Limes are hermaphroditic, having perfect flowers with both male and female parts, pollinated by insects.

The genus is generally called lime or linden in Britain[1] and linden, lime, or basswood in North America.[2] "Lime" is an altered form of Middle English lind, in the 16th century also line, from Old English feminine lind or linde, Proto-Germanic *lendā, cognate to Latin lentus "flexible" and Sanskrit latā "liana". Within Germanic languages, English "lithe", German lind "lenient, yielding" are from the same root. "Linden" was originally the adjective, "made from lime-wood" (equivalent to "wooden"); from the late 16th century, "linden" was also used as a noun, probably influenced by translations of German romance, as an adoption of Linden, the plural of German Linde.[3] Neither the name nor the tree is related to the citrus fruit called "lime" (Citrus aurantifolia, family Rutaceae). Another common name used in North America is basswood, derived from bast, the name for the inner bark (see Uses, below). Teil is an old name for the lime tree. Latin tilia is cognate to Greek πτελέᾱ, ptelea, "elm tree", τιλίαι, tiliai, "black poplar" (Hes.), ultimately from a Proto-Indo-European word *ptel-eā with a meaning of "broad" (feminine); perhaps "broad-leaved" or similar.

Tilia Tilia

Sourcebook: The surname Linder is derived from the linden tree, which is found over most of Europe and is much celebrated in folklore. Linden trees often served as the focal points of village squares, early outdoor justice courts and community meeting places. Dragons were thought to live under the tree. (p. xii)

Last edited by Alex Linder; September 23rd, 2013 at 11:44 AM.
 
Old September 23rd, 2013 #4
Alex Linder
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Sourcebook:

Quote:
There are about 50,000 people named Linder living in the world today. (There are also numerous, uncounted married women, perhaps as many as 20,000, whose maiden name was Linder). Linder is an international surname with members in at least 30 countries. The data is based on a count of Internet telephone listings and the numbers are probably reasonable estimates for the year 2000.

Almost half of all Linders live in the United States and a further one-quarter live in Germany. More than 90% of all Linders live in the United States, Germany, Switzerland and Sweden. Austria and France also have significant numbers of Linders, but these are concentrated in areas adjacent to Switzerland and Germany.

[...] Switzerland has the greatest Linder density (Linders per million population) in the world. On a per capita basis it has 6 times more Linders than Germany and 10 times more than the United States. Linders are widespread throughout Switzerland, but the canton of Bern dominates in both absolute numbers and in density. Twenty of the Swiss cantons (out of 26) have higher Linder densities than the highest German Land (Baden-Wurttemberg).

There is also a concentration of Linders in Sweden, with relatively low Linder densities in northern Germany. This distribution tends to confirm the general belief that the Swiss-German Linders are a separate population from the Swedish Linders. (p. 3)






Last edited by Alex Linder; September 23rd, 2013 at 11:58 AM.
 
Old September 23rd, 2013 #5
Alex Linder
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E. Linder and Lindner

The two surnames, Linder and Lindner, are frequently confused. In response to my inquiry, Dr. Winfried Breidbach, Namenberatung, Gesellschaft fur deutsche Sprache (Name Consultation, Society for Germany Language), Wiesbaden, Germany kindly sent me information, including the following:

"Origin: both Lindner and Linder are formed with suffix -er marking the relaton to the basic word:

Linden + er = Lindener = shortened almost regularly = Lindner, Lintner, Lindtner.

Lind, Linde, Linda + -er = Linder".

"Concerning the original meaning of Lindner and Linder denoting a person there are two possibilties:

1. Linder, Lindner denotes a person who has residence "by or near a lime tree" ((bei der) Linde singular), "by or near a couple or a wood of lime trees" ((bei den) Linden plural).

2. Linder, Lindner denotes a person who came from a place or town called Lind, Linda, Linde, Linden, Lindenau etc. (each of these variants of place names existed/exists frequently).

In case of a given family, there is no way to verify one of these two possibilities (except that old documents give explicit evidence)."

Since linden trees are widespread over the German-speaking areas considered here, one might expect Linder and Lindner distributions to be similar. However, a study of surnames in German-speaking cities by Brechenmacher (1957), based on 1930 data, shows that each name has an area of dominance with relatively little overlap. In general, Linder is dominant in southern Germany and Switzerland and Lindner is dominant in eastern Germany and adjacent areas of Poland. The boundary area runs east-west about the latitude of Frankfurt. My study of current (2000) telephone listings gives generally similar results. (p. 6)
 
Old September 23rd, 2013 #6
Alex Linder
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[more tomorrow. will do a little each day until it's all up.]
 
Old October 1st, 2013 #7
Solskeniskyn
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We've got a good number of Linders in Sweden. Stumbled upon this one today, a (*another) Linder that fought the jew-communists, back then, in the guise of the Soviet giant.
Quote:

[Linder to the left]

Ernst Linder (April 25, 1868 Pohja – September 14, 1943) was a Swedish general of Finnish descent who served in the Swedish army from 1887 to 1918, after which be participated in the Finnish Civil War as the commander of the Satakunta and Savo army groups, whose responsibility stretched from Finland's western coast adjoining the Gulf of Bothnia to Näsijärvi.[1] Linder was a friend of the White Commander, Marshal C.G.E. Mannerheim. Following the war, he served as Inspector of Cavalry until retired in 1920.

Linder was promoted into the rank of Major General on April 13, 1918, Lieutenant General in 1938, and General of Cavalry in 1940.

In the Winter War, the 71-year-old Linder led the Swedish Volunteer Corps from January 6 to February 27, 1940, after which he functioned as a commander of the Salla area.

In addition to his military career, Linder was an accomplished horse rider who competed in the 1924 Summer Olympics, where he and his horse Piccolomino won the gold medal in the individual dressage.

Linder is buried at Norra begravningsplatsen in Stockholm.
Ernst_Linder Ernst_Linder

Last edited by Solskeniskyn; October 1st, 2013 at 06:08 AM.
 
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