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Old March 17th, 2007 #21
banjo_billy
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Originally Posted by Commoner View Post
Does anyone know of a good fighting system/martial art for a beginner with no martial arts experience? Something appropriate for everyday, all around self defense. There are many to choose from out there, so maybe someone with experience could recommend one. Thanks.
All fighting systems start you at the beginning. So, if you are a beginner, just choose whatever appeals to you and wherever you study, the teachers will start you at the beginning.

Large cities usually have a wide variety of schools. And they wouldn't be teaching if what they taught wasn't for all around defense. The main thing is to choose a school and begin.
 
Old May 16th, 2008 #22
Alias1983
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Originally Posted by 14Orion View Post
Allright, so I haven't actually checked out the accelerated battlefield combatatives yet, but I do train in TFT and would dearly love to school you in person, but in the meantime, say hello to my ignore list, you wretched sack of shit.
Okay. Anyone reading this, do not listen to anything 14Orion has to say. Let me tell you someting. 14Orion posted the above comment on March 2007. Well let me tell you something. He hasn't trained in TFT and he knows nothing about it other than what the website www.tftgroup.com tells you. I met 14Orion in China and I can say that he's not even a true loyal white man. He learned about TFT when I told him about it. And then he was telling me that when he gets back to Australia, he's gonna train in it. So there ya have it. He says "I do train in TFT and would dearly love to school you in person". Very funny. Like I said. He hasn't been training in it.
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Originally Posted by 14Orion View Post
and subrosa, you fucking wanna be jihadist, you can chew my big knobbly one.
Oh. That comment makes a lot of sense. "YOu can chew my big knobbly one". Yeah 14Orion? Big knobbly what? No one here know's what the hell you're even talking about.
 
Old May 16th, 2008 #23
Odell
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Odell
Default The Art...

My Ol' man studies what is called Systema.

History

The Russian style of martial art dates back to the 10th century.

Throughout the history of this huge country, Russia had to repel invaders from the north, south, east, and west. All attackers brought their distinct styles of combat and weaponry. The battles took place on different terrain, during freezing winters and sweltering summer heat alike, with the Russians often greatly outnumbered by the enemy forces. As a result of these factors, the Russian warriors acquired a style that combined strong spirit with extremely innovative and versatile tactics that were at the same time practical, deadly, and effective against any type of enemy under any circumstances. The style was natural and free while having no strict rules, rigid structure or limitations (except for moral ones). All tactics were based on instinctive reactions, individual strengths and characteristics, specifically designed for fast learning.

When the Communists came to power in 1917, they suppressed all national traditions. Those practicing the old style of fighting could be severely punished. At the same time, the authorities quickly realized how viable and devastating the original combat system was and reserved it just for a few Special Operations Units.

In our schools and through the instructional materials, you will learn this fascinating style and see for yourself why Russian Systema is said to open a new page in the world of martial arts.

Here is a link to the website
http://www.russianmartialart.com/
Enjoy


.
 
Old May 16th, 2008 #24
Richard H.
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Originally Posted by Odell View Post
My Ol' man studies what is called Systema.

History

The Russian style of martial art dates back to the 10th century.

Throughout the history of this huge country, Russia had to repel invaders from the north, south, east, and west. All attackers brought their distinct styles of combat and weaponry. The battles took place on different terrain, during freezing winters and sweltering summer heat alike, with the Russians often greatly outnumbered by the enemy forces. As a result of these factors, the Russian warriors acquired a style that combined strong spirit with extremely innovative and versatile tactics that were at the same time practical, deadly, and effective against any type of enemy under any circumstances. The style was natural and free while having no strict rules, rigid structure or limitations (except for moral ones). All tactics were based on instinctive reactions, individual strengths and characteristics, specifically designed for fast learning.

When the Communists came to power in 1917, they suppressed all national traditions. Those practicing the old style of fighting could be severely punished. At the same time, the authorities quickly realized how viable and devastating the original combat system was and reserved it just for a few Special Operations Units.

In our schools and through the instructional materials, you will learn this fascinating style and see for yourself why Russian Systema is said to open a new page in the world of martial arts.

Here is a link to the website
http://www.russianmartialart.com/
Enjoy


.
WHAT ABOUT SAMBO; THE RUSSIAN ART OF BREAKING BONES
 
Old May 16th, 2008 #25
Odell
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WHAT ABOUT SAMBO; THE RUSSIAN ART OF BREAKING BONES
He said that Sambo and other forms are incorporated into Systema.

Since me and my Ol' man have been together I have seen him defend himself twice,
and it was the quickest two fights I have ever seen.

I have been studying for a couple of years now and
it is easy and straight to the point.

They have many tapes on varies things, schools, training partners,
and what they call an "IMMERSION CAMP", which he went on a few
years back. He said it was worth a great deal more than the cost.


.
 
Old May 30th, 2008 #26
Akingu
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Default Back to the plot...

14!

First of, see what dojos are in your town. Don't worry about what people say about only studying a white style. Visit each dojo and watch the classes. Is the dojo clean? Are there heavy and speed bags? Does the Sensei encourage sparring? Does he encourage the members and work with them or is it a mass-produced class?
After you've seen them all, make a decision on what you liked about them. Examples:
Karate-hard style, 50/50 hands/feet, great conditioning, great speed training, great body conditioning
Gung Fus/Pa Kur/Wing Chun-usually a softer style (except WC), 50/50 hands/feet, great agility training, sparring, weapons, hard body conditioning, makiwaras, WC dummies,
Hapkido/Tang Soo Do/Korean styles- harder styles, 50/50 hands/feet, very
hard training-boards, knuckle push ups, etc..
Aikido-70/30 hands/feet, lots of falling and throwing, speed training, wrist/arm locks
Ninjutsu-great physical conditioning, leads towards a more spiritual/universal/creationistic belief, weapons, speed, agility are plusses

Good luck and congrats on wanting to learn the disipline!

RR!

A88
 
Old June 2nd, 2008 #27
Richard H.
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Originally Posted by Akingu88 View Post
14!

First of, see what dojos are in your town. Don't worry about what people say about only studying a white style. Visit each dojo and watch the classes. Is the dojo clean? Are there heavy and speed bags? Does the Sensei encourage sparring? Does he encourage the members and work with them or is it a mass-produced class?
After you've seen them all, make a decision on what you liked about them. Examples:
Karate-hard style, 50/50 hands/feet, great conditioning, great speed training, great body conditioning
Gung Fus/Pa Kur/Wing Chun-usually a softer style (except WC), 50/50 hands/feet, great agility training, sparring, weapons, hard body conditioning, makiwaras, WC dummies,
Hapkido/Tang Soo Do/Korean styles- harder styles, 50/50 hands/feet, very
hard training-boards, knuckle push ups, etc..
Aikido-70/30 hands/feet, lots of falling and throwing, speed training, wrist/arm locks
Ninjutsu-great physical conditioning, leads towards a more spiritual/universal/creationistic belief, weapons, speed, agility are plusses

Good luck and congrats on wanting to learn the disipline!

RR!

A88
I have learned a great style as well; S&W 9mm
 
Old June 2nd, 2008 #28
cillian
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Originally Posted by Akingu88 View Post
Ninjutsu-great physical conditioning, leads towards a more spiritual/universal/creationistic belief, weapons, speed, agility are plusses
I took ninjitsu for about 4 or 5 months, it was just too far from my house to keep going. But if I could only study 1 style of fighting again that would be it.
 
Old June 3rd, 2008 #29
Akingu
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Thumbs up

14!

There is a new Okinawan Shorin Ryu style open real close now so I am going to start back up in a real Dojo again.
Shorin Ryu or Goju Ryu are both very hard styles with lots of body-toughening exercises and speed training. Just what this old man needs!

RR!

A88
 
Old June 3rd, 2008 #30
cillian
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Originally Posted by Akingu88 View Post
14!

There is a new Okinawan Shorin Ryu style open real close now so I am going to start back up in a real Dojo again.
Shorin Ryu or Goju Ryu are both very hard styles with lots of body-toughening exercises and speed training. Just what this old man needs!

RR!

A88
Shorin Ryu is good, it is the real karate, all others are immitations. It becomes a soft style when you get to the 3rd year or so. Instead of hard blocking itís a deflection move with an open hand that allows for quick counter attacking.
 
Old June 3rd, 2008 #31
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The object is to get the fight over as soon as possible with little or no damage to yourself. Running in lead-lined boots is great for conditioning, but if you don't know how to put down an opponent quickly, you're only going to walk away (if at all) with aches and pains for the next few days, and possibly permanent damage.

I've seen big dudes that were in excellent shape get their asses kicked because they didn't know how to fight.
Most "men" and boys don't know how to fight, or properly defend themself from someone who (minimally) does. It is mostly all...

That is the only realistic thing about Jewy Springer, is most guys fight about that badly, like stupid dogs (as opposed to clawing cats)...Except that is staged too of course...and exaggerated as well to make them (mostly white guys) looks even more ridiculous. And the people there are those big of low lifes to actually agree to appear on that show and act that way for that pretenious kike faggot pimp.

The ones who are most load and abrasive like the people on that show (and like most niggers) are not the ones you have to watch out for. The bullies or bullshitters or chickenshitters scared and putting on an "angry" poker face, trying to convince you not to fight them. They are mostly fighting with their mouth. But street fights should be avoided unless you know how and intend to take care of a guy quickly. It is the ones who are more calm and cool, and thinking about what they are going to do to you. This is why these muds they try to illicit "fear" so you cannot focus on what needs to be done, if nesessary, and they don't have to attempt to fight. It is mental.

As far as it goes Taekwondo teaches you how to best "hurt" someone with just a couple punches, and deflect his. It is none of that unnecessary faggy dancing shit like some others.
 
Old June 4th, 2008 #32
Akingu
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14!

I always practice that a block is a strike. I'm sure you're familiar with koppojutsu from your posts. I took the Goju Ryu for about 6 months in college from a fellow student and I really enjoyed the katas so the styles should be fairly similar.
The hard-core training is what I'm really missing. I have a 100 lb heavy bag, a wing chung dummy and a 2X4 hemp-covered makiwara to train on but the class training is more motivational.
Thanks for the hard/soft transition note. I'll ask the Sensei about it.
It's nice to see some comparative posts here guys! Thanks!

A88


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Originally Posted by cillian View Post
Shorin Ryu is good, it is the real karate, all others are immitations. It becomes a soft style when you get to the 3rd year or so. Instead of hard blocking itís a deflection move with an open hand that allows for quick counter attacking.
 
Old June 4th, 2008 #33
cillian
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Originally Posted by Akingu88 View Post
14!

I always practice that a block is a strike. I'm sure you're familiar with koppojutsu from your posts. I took the Goju Ryu for about 6 months in college from a fellow student and I really enjoyed the katas so the styles should be fairly similar.
I took shorin ryu for 4 years, but the school closed about a month before my black belt test (Iím still a little upset about that) we did lots of knuckle push ups on the wooden floor, makiwara training, and something called arm training (basically you pair up and one person sticks his arm out and the other guy does a chest block then a head block then pulls your arm down and does an overhand chop then he punches and you do the same) and we were expected to have bruises up and down the forearm when we were done.
Quote:
The hard-core training is what I'm really missing. I have a 100 lb heavy bag, a wing chung dummy and a 2X4 hemp-covered makiwara to train on but the class training is more motivational.
I know what you mean.
Quote:
Thanks for the hard/soft transition note. I'll ask the Sensei about it.
It's nice to see some comparative posts here guys!
You will see it in the green belt katas, cat stance and chops.
 
Old June 4th, 2008 #34
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All of the martial arts are effective in different ways.

The external hard style fellows will take a watermelon and with one punch smash it into pieces.

The internal soft style fellows will take a watermelon and slap it with an open palm but nothing seems to happen at all -- until you take a knife and cut open the melon then all of the insides slosh out in a mush.

The watermelon gets fucked up either way. It's just a difference in technique.

I prefer the internal soft styles of kungfu. When you kill your opponent, you leave no marks on the body; only the internal organs are ruptured.

Last edited by banjo_billy; June 4th, 2008 at 05:33 PM.
 
Old June 4th, 2008 #35
Neil Hudson
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Originally Posted by banjo_billy View Post
All of the martial arts are effective in different ways.

The external hard style fellows will take a watermelon and with one punch smash it into pieces.

The internal soft style fellows will take a watermelon and slap it with an open palm but nothing seems to happen at all -- until you take a knife and cut open the melon then all of the insides slosh out in a mush.

The watermelon gets fucked up either way. It's just a difference in technique.

I prefer the internal soft styles of kungfu. When you kill your opponent, you leave no marks on the body; only the internal organs are ruptured.
What do you think about Tae Kwon Do?

I have read that it was introduced in 1955.

Is it effective compared to the more ancient martial arts?
 
Old June 4th, 2008 #36
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What do you think about Tae Kwon Do?

I have read that it was introduced in 1955.

Is it effective compared to the more ancient martial arts?
Tae Kwan Do is based on the older korean martial arts. The heavy focus on kicks is because in the old days soldiers would be armed with spears or scimitars, so training punches seemed pointless.

The way I see it, itís not the style that makes a fighter good, itís the way itís used. A pro boxer could lose a fight to a rugby player if he is tackled.
 
Old June 4th, 2008 #37
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Originally Posted by cillian View Post
Tae Kwan Do is based on the older korean martial arts. The heavy focus on kicks is because in the old days soldiers would be armed with spears or scimitars, so training punches seemed pointless.

The way I see it, it’s not the style that makes a fighter good, it’s the way it’s used. A pro boxer could lose a fight to a rugby player if he is tackled.
So Tae Kwon Do would be good if some niggers attack me while at the gas station so I could use a tire iron and kick the same time.
 
Old June 4th, 2008 #38
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So Tae Kwon Do would be good if some niggers attack me while at the gas station so I could use a tire iron and kick the same time.
That would be the ideal time to use it.
 
Old June 4th, 2008 #39
banjo_billy
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What do you think about Tae Kwon Do?

I have read that it was introduced in 1955.

Is it effective compared to the more ancient martial arts?
Even in Korea, Tae Kwon Do is categorized as a martial sport and not a martial art; while the other Korean styles are categorized as martial arts.

It's impressive to watch but getting in the habit of doing high kicks is dangerous in a real fight. Also, the fancy air-born kicks are not desirable to make into a personal habit since both high kicks and flying kicks can get you dumped on your ass too easily.

In addition, Tae Kwon Do is taught to Westerners with the heel of the rear foot raised up and the weight of the foot on the ball of the foot. Allegedly, this is taught "for a speedier punch". But the original Tae Kwan Do as taught to the Koreans kept the rear foot flat for a more powerful punch.

Because it is a sporting style, emphasizing high kicking and teaching light speed over solid power, there are better karate styles than Tae Kwon Do.

The only technique that it has that is superior to other karate styles is its upward block which allows the downward strike to pass-by rather than meeting it force to force. Other than that, most other styles of karate are better than Tae Kwan Do.
 
Old June 4th, 2008 #40
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re banjo billy:
Taekwando does seem to be more about showing off, jumping triple kicks and such. But the same can be said of many styles of karate, and even kung fu. Where the emphasis is placed on kata tournaments and gymnastics rather than sparing. It really depends on the school and even more so on the student. You get out what you put in, if you train to fight you will learn to, and if you train to show off thatís all youíll have.
 
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