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Old October 18th, 2007 #21
JesseGibson
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Hi Hate Beast:

"What is GPP?"

General Physical Preparedness. And I completely agree with you as per cardio. My comments were made as a powerlifter. To be healthy, look good, be strong, etc., cardio should be a primary part of any program.

Squatting:

If you get light headed or start to pass out, I'd forgo squatting. Stick with the leg presses, it's safer than risking severe injury. Had a friend who had the same problem. He leg pressed.

Benching:

In the old days, the guys weren't using the shirts they are nowadays. But guys are becoming better with shirts and likely getting stronger overall.

All the best, brother
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Old October 19th, 2007 #22
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Originally Posted by JesseGibson View Post
Hi Hate Beast:

"What is GPP?"

General Physical Preparedness. And I completely agree with you as per cardio. My comments were made as a powerlifter. To be healthy, look good, be strong, etc., cardio should be a primary part of any program.
Yep. I hate cardio as much as the next guy, but you have to do it if you want maximum performance from your body.

My hitch in the Marine Corps killed any desire I had to run or jog, and I ain't running anywhere these days unless someone is shooting at me, so that shit is out.

I do 3 minute rounds all out on the heavy bag. That will wear you out. Swimming laps works, too.
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Old October 19th, 2007 #23
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Yep. I hate cardio as much as the next guy, but you have to do it if you want maximum performance from your body.

My hitch in the Marine Corps killed any desire I had to run or jog, and I ain't running anywhere these days unless someone is shooting at me, so that shit is out.

I do 3 minute rounds all out on the heavy bag. That will wear you out. Swimming laps works, too.
That kind of cardio is more practical, anyway.
Believe it or not, distance running really won't do shit for your endurance in a fight.

Working the heavy bag too much reinforced some really bad habits for me, though, like dropping my hands and sacrificing mobility for power.


I've been doing high-rep circuit training 2 or 3 times a week in addition to my strength routine. You're using a different energy system, so it really doesn't interfere with strength training. Circuits will kick your ass.
 
Old October 20th, 2007 #24
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Is there anything you can do to get rid of stretch marks?
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Old October 20th, 2007 #25
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Is there anything you can do to get rid of stretch marks?
Honestly and sadly, not that I know of, with the exception of some sort of cosmetic surgery.
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Old October 21st, 2007 #26
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Is there anything you can do to get rid of stretch marks?
A divorce?
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Old October 21st, 2007 #27
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Originally Posted by ngrh8r View Post
That kind of cardio is more practical, anyway.
Believe it or not, distance running really won't do shit for your endurance in a fight.

Working the heavy bag too much reinforced some really bad habits for me, though, like dropping my hands and sacrificing mobility for power.
I know exactly what you mean.

When I first started working on the bag, I just tried to hit it as hard as I could for as long as I could. Paid no attention to leverage or anything else. Grunted a lot. Just tried to look cool beatin' the shit out of the bag for the spandex resplendent Gym Bunnies.

After a couple of weeks of me flailing away at the bag like an idiot, a fellow member who had boxed GG kind of took me under his wing re: Heavy Bag work.

I have a healthy respect for boxers. Those guys get into great shape. (At least they better)
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Old October 22nd, 2007 #28
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Here's another question.

When I was in my 20's, I used to do heavy leg presses and my legs would be sore for a week or longer - sometimes I would have to wait two weeks until doing them again. I did little or no cardio back then.

In my 30's, I started doing cardio work and I now do 40-minutes to two hours or longer a day. This consists of riding the exercise bike at the gym at one of the highest levels. I try to do this at least five times a week.

Now, when I do leg presses, I am every bit as strong - if not stronger - than I was in my 20's, but my legs are hardly sore. So if I had the time (and energy), I can work my legs a lot more often.

However, when I do upper body real hard, I find I am still very sore for a week or longer. Obviously, riding the bike did not help me there.

My lower body endurance and ability to recover is great. This is NOT at all the case with my upper body.

Should I switch over to another cardio exercise that works BOTH upper and lower body? What would you recommend?
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Old October 23rd, 2007 #29
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Originally Posted by Hate Beast View Post
Here's another question.

When I was in my 20's, I used to do heavy leg presses and my legs would be sore for a week or longer - sometimes I would have to wait two weeks until doing them again. I did little or no cardio back then.

In my 30's, I started doing cardio work and I now do 40-minutes to two hours or longer a day. This consists of riding the exercise bike at the gym at one of the highest levels. I try to do this at least five times a week.

Now, when I do leg presses, I am every bit as strong - if not stronger - than I was in my 20's, but my legs are hardly sore. So if I had the time (and energy), I can work my legs a lot more often.

However, when I do upper body real hard, I find I am still very sore for a week or longer. Obviously, riding the bike did not help me there.

My lower body endurance and ability to recover is great. This is NOT at all the case with my upper body.

Should I switch over to another cardio exercise that works BOTH upper and lower body? What would you recommend?
To be very honest with you, I am uncertain. I guess I would attribute your lower body work capacity to have increased via the cardio work. Perhaps it's something you should give a shot in the upper body arena, also. There are lots of things you do to aid it, e.g. sled dragging with the arms only, seated rowing machine that utilizes a chain and allows you to sit and pull away (pushing with legs as well) for 15-20 minutes, loading sandbags onto a pickup bed focussing on arm usage, walking on one of those 'elipticals' using the arm handles, etc. Start off slowly and see if you start to see some changes in your upper body workouts... CNS burnout is also an issue... For me it was quite often a fast twitch/slow twitch issue, I always had to be cautious of cardio along with my ME weight training exercises

All the Best
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Old October 23rd, 2007 #30
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Hate Beast;

I've been doing variations on this:
http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle....rmanceTraining

Also check out the Hammer Down Endurance program. There's a link in the article. You might want to modify the program to suit your own needs. I like to substitute box jumps and other plyometrics for some of the leg work.

These full-body circuits will kick your ass! No other athlete in the world has the stamina possesed by pro fighters.

This type of training is a great compliment to high weight, low rep weights.
I've been doing this IN ADDITION to strength training 3 times a week. After less than a month, I already notice a huge difference in my cardio and muscular endurance.

I ain't gonna lie; circuit training feels pretty shitty. Your heart will pound, your lungs will ache and your head will spin(if you're doing things right), but the unpleasantness will quickly pass as your body adapts to the new demands you've placed on it.
 
Old October 24th, 2007 #31
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Originally Posted by JesseGibson View Post
There are lots of things you do to aid it, e.g. sled dragging with the arms only, seated rowing machine that utilizes a chain and allows you to sit and pull away (pushing with legs as well) for 15-20 minutes, loading sandbags onto a pickup bed focussing on arm usage, walking on one of those 'elipticals' using the arm handles, etc.
My gym used to have a vertical climber – which would be ideal. I did manage to try out the stair climber/cross country skiing machine – and it works great! I can barely do 20 minutes. I think I am going to work up to 45 minutes, five times a week – I can start off light and eventually get to the toughest level. I can really feel it in my upper body – this is EXACTLY what I am looking for.
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Originally Posted by ngrh8r View Post
Also check out the Hammer Down Endurance program. There's a link in the article. You might want to modify the program to suit your own needs. I like to substitute box jumps and other plyometrics for some of the leg work.

These full-body circuits will kick your ass! No other athlete in the world has the stamina possesed by pro fighters.
I agree - those guys are the best athletes in the world. The article was an interesting read too. If I were training to be a fighter, that's something definitely worth giving a try.

My focus is very narrow - like a lift specialist. I don't want anything that is going to overtax my system - just a full body cardio workout (aerobic in opposed to anaerobic) to improve circulation and blood flow and dramatically improve my recovery time. I think I found it with this stair climber/cross country skiing machine.

If this works as far as increasing recovery time, the benefit will be HUGE – instead of hitting my specialty lift once a month, I can do it every week, or even a couple times a week – I’ll get where I need to be MUCH sooner.
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Last edited by H.B.; October 24th, 2007 at 07:15 PM.
 
Old October 26th, 2007 #32
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Originally Posted by Hate Beast View Post


My focus is very narrow - like a lift specialist. I don't want anything that is going to overtax my system - just a full body cardio workout (aerobic in opposed to anaerobic) to improve circulation and blood flow and dramatically improve my recovery time. I think I found it with this stair climber/cross country skiing machine.
Yeah, sometimes I forget that normal people don't consider vomiting a sign of an good, intense cardio workout.

Here's a few things that are almost guaranteed to speed recovery:

1) Eat more protein - shoot for a good 150 grams or so per day, minimum
2) Get more sleep - healing is most efficient during REM sleep
3) Post workout nutrition - pre-and-post workout meals are very important
4) Take a break - You've been hittin' the iron pretty hard for a month or 2? Give yourself a week to recover. You'll be STRONGER when you get back into the gym. Light cardio during your break.
 
Old October 26th, 2007 #33
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1) Eat more protein - shoot for a good 150 grams or so per day, minimum
I eat close to that each day - in addition to regular meals, I have one to two protein shakes at 34 grams a pop.
Quote:
2) Get more sleep - healing is most efficient during REM sleep
I sleep about nine hours a night.

Quote:
3) Post workout nutrition - pre-and-post workout meals are very important
I take a pre-workout "anabolic stimulant" I got from the health food store that has Glutamine Peptide, Creatine and their own special blend of amino acids in it. After every training session, I take a Pure Protein bar that has 34 grams of protein in it.

I also take fish oil, Alicin (Garlic derivative), Magnesium, MSM, Vitamin C, pre-meal digestive enzymes (to help with protein absorption), and alternate with various Glucosamine products for the joints, tendons and ligaments.

Quote:
4) Take a break - You've been hittin' the iron pretty hard for a month or 2? Give yourself a week to recover. You'll be STRONGER when you get back into the gym. Light cardio during your break.
Unfortunately, I have set some high goals for myself and cannot back down, even if I tried. Even during times of injury or extreme soreness, I still find a way or working around whatever needs to heal.

Having to max out once every three weeks to a month has been my biggest complaint but my program seems to be working. Even when sore, I am stronger than I was in the previous training session.

I should add that I also like hitting the bag a lot its a lot of fun and I no longer get out of breath doing it like I used to.
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Old November 9th, 2007 #34
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I did manage to try out the stair climber/cross country skiing machine – and it works great! I can barely do 20 minutes. I think I am going to work up to 45 minutes, five times a week ...
Today, I just did 90 minutes on that machine without too much difficulty.

I've got another question: could doing a lot of cardio hurt what you lift? I see doing one to two hours on the stair climber/cross country skiing machine up to six days a week: my goal is TOTAL FITNESS but to be as strong as an ox as well.

It seems like a lot of heavy lifters do not like cardio - and tragically, a lot of heavy lifters are dropping like flies too.

Now the NFL has people who are in great cardio shape AND strong, but in looking at their numbers, they are actually quite weak by powerlifting standards.

One of the most retarded training things I read was Dinosaur Training - it's a lot of thick grip, old school stuff where they are explicit about NOT doing cardio. Again, not to sound redundant, but why start and exercise program and neglect by far the most important muscle in your body?
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Last edited by H.B.; November 9th, 2007 at 05:38 PM.
 
Old November 9th, 2007 #35
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One of the most retarded training thing I read was Dinosaur Training - it's a lot of thick grip, old school stuff where they are explicit about NOT doing cardio. Again, not to sound redundant, but why start and exercise program and neglect by far the most important muscle in your body?

High volume, low or moderate intensity cardio can have a negative impact on strength and size gains. I know distance running more than 1 or 2 times a week will seriously fuck up my leg strength.

I agree that the idea of neglecting cardio is fucking retarded, though.

Wind sprints and other high intesity interval training apparently don't affect muscle growth the same way. Plus, you can get a good cardio session in less time this way. I don't know about you, but I can't stand cardio. The less time I have to spend, the better.
 
Old November 9th, 2007 #36
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High volume, low or moderate intensity cardio can have a negative impact on strength and size gains. I know distance running more than 1 or 2 times a week will seriously fuck up my leg strength.
I didn't mean to ask pretty much the same question twice in this thread, but that is what I thought. I have seen a nearly 300-pound bodybuilder who did an hour of cardio a day for seven days a week, so there might be a cutoff point where you can keep strength and size and have decent cardiovascular fitness.
Quote:
Wind sprints and other high intensity interval training apparently don't affect muscle growth the same way. Plus, you can get a good cardio session in less time this way. I don't know about you, but I can't stand cardio. The less time I have to spend, the better.
Would not wind sprints be more anaerobic than aerobic? I did not like cardio at first, but the more I did it, the more I didn't mind it. As a benefit, since I stepped up the cardio, I no longer feel like I am going to pass out when I do the heavy lifting - or out-of-breath, or uncomfortable at all.
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Old November 17th, 2007 #37
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Squats are absolute king of exercises. Nothing else can compare. Squatting will put muscles on a fucking grapefruit.
I do not disagree one bit.

However...

Check this guy out - Jimmy "the Iron Bull" Pellechia. He's says he's done some very freaky weight: a 1015-pound "assisted" bench press, 650-pound skull crushers, 150-pound alternate dumbbell curls and 180-pound flies:

Quote:
What do you do for legs?

JP: I'm not a big fan of barbell squats and do leg presses and hack squats. Occasionally I do leg extensions and leg curls and I kick a heavy bag a lot for cardio and for leg strength.
http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=461953

I've been looking for his stuff on YouTube and Google video but nothing's been uploaded yet. I heard his form isn't the best but those who know him call him "one of the strongest men, pound for pound, on the planet."
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Old November 18th, 2007 #38
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Question Max heart rate and target heart rate?

I've got a few more questions - I'll probably know the answers to this in a few weeks when I finally get around to reading the NSCA's Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning.

I've heard some talk about target heart rate - that you need to exceed this for X number of minutes in order to get a beneficial aerobic workout. When I type in my demographic data, the machine gives me a target heart rate of 147. On some days, I cannot come close to reaching that number, no matter how hard I try - on other days, I can, but it's hard to stay there for long.

Today, for example, I could barely break 130. I think that's because I took yesterday off. Yet, two days ago, I was able to get into the 150's briefly. I think that was because I did a heavy back and leg day the day before.

I was wondering if someone can explain max heart rate and target heart rate and why there might be huge fluctuations in what you are able to achieve on a particular day?
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Old November 18th, 2007 #39
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I've got a few more questions - I'll probably know the answers to this in a few weeks when I finally get around to reading the NSCA's Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning.

I've heard some talk about target heart rate - that you need to exceed this for X number of minutes in order to get a beneficial aerobic workout. When I type in my demographic data, the machine gives me a target heart rate of 147. On some days, I cannot come close to reaching that number, no matter how hard I try - on other days, I can, but it's hard to stay there for long.

Today, for example, I could barely break 130. I think that's because I took yesterday off. Yet, two days ago, I was able to get into the 150's briefly. I think that was because I did a heavy back and leg day the day before.

I was wondering if someone can explain max heart rate and target heart rate and why there might be huge fluctuations in what you are able to achieve on a particular day?
A target rate of 147 seems awfully high. Is that the max end of your target range?

Max heart rate is calculated by subtracting your age from 220. The target range is 50-85% of the max heart rate. If you're over 20 years old, anything over 100 will be within the target range.

Oh, and if you're taking any medication for high blood pressure, your max and target range must both be decreased.
 
Old November 18th, 2007 #40
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A target rate of 147 seems awfully high. Is that the max end of your target range?
I just figured out that the machine gives you a target of 80% your max heart rate. I did not know the range was 50-85%, so what I have been getting is well within that range.

My resting heart rate is still in the 64-70 range, so I guess I don't qualify as an athlete just yet.
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Last edited by H.B.; November 19th, 2007 at 10:37 AM. Reason: Updating pulse
 
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