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Old 4 Weeks Ago #21
T.Garrett
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Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Manhasset, NY
Posts: 4,704
T.Garrett
Talking ok then

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stewart Meadows View Post
I didn't say that I can't "understand much Sardinian", I said that I don't speak it (because that's what you asked me). Do you understand the difference between active and passive knowledge of a language?
Ah, ok I didn't make that distinction because I rarely have discussions with people involving the nuances of linguistics. Of course I understand, I actively speak American English (New Yawk gibberish) and have passive knowledge of Dutch and German and to a lesser extent, Quebecois French.

Just out of curiosity did you become familiar with Sardinian from being around people who spoke the language daily as their native tongue or did you learn what you know about the language during the course of your studies as you say you did Latin?

You really don't catch on very quickly when I'm joking with you Stewart, maybe its the medium we are using to communicate here?

OK, I say fuck your academics I believe Italian is closer to Latin than semitized Sardinian, its basically like splitting a hair to say either language is 'closer' to the ancient tongue according to the experts anyway.

At worst, I'm only a little bit wrong.
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Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres; unam partem incolunt Belgae ...

Last edited by T.Garrett; 4 Weeks Ago at 08:17 PM. Reason: cant forget the French
 
Old 4 Weeks Ago #22
Ray Allan
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Ray Allan
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It would be interesting if Alex Him could give us some insight about various Russian dialects. Russia is a vast country with many different dialects. Then there are offshoots of the Russian language such as Ukrainian and Belarusian.
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"Military men are dumb, stupid animals to be used as pawns for foreign policy."

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Old 4 Weeks Ago #23
Stewart Meadows
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Stewart Meadows
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T.Garrett View Post
Ah, ok I didn't make that distinction because I rarely have discussions with people involving the nuances of linguistics. Of course I understand, I actively speak American English (New Yawk gibberish) and have passive knowledge of Dutch and German and to a lesser extent, Quebecois French.
Exactly. That's what I'm talking about.

Quote:
Just out of curiosity did you become familiar with Sardinian from being around people who spoke the language daily as their native tongue or did you learn what you know about the language during the course of your studies as you say you did Latin?
The latter (i.e. the bolded part).

Quote:
You really don't catch on very quickly when I'm joking with you Stewart, maybe its the medium we are using to communicate here?
Yeah, maybe it's the medium...or maybe I'm just slower than the average person. (Could be.)

Quote:
OK, I say fuck your academics I believe Italian is closer to Latin than semitized Sardinian,
You're entitled to your opinion, but I think that you're putting too much emphasis on the Semitic influence. It's not like Sardinian is some half-Romance/half-Semitic gutter language; it has a solid Latin base.

Even if you just take a quick look at some Sardinian texts or sentences, it almost immediately becomes apparent why it's considered the most conservative Romance language. Look at the following excerpt from the Wikipedia article that I linked to in one of my previous posts:

Quote:
For example, Latin "Pone mihi tres panes in bertula" (put three loaves of bread [from home] in the bag for me) would be the very similar "Ponemi tres panes in bertula" in Sardinian.[22]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sardinian_language

In the Italian-language version of this Wikipedia page, the above sentence reads "Mettimi tre pani nella bisaccia". Now let's compare these languages to each other:

English: Put three loaves of bread in the bag for me.

Latin: Pone mihi tres panes in bertula.

Sardinian: Ponemi tres panes in bertula.

Italian: Mettimi tre pani nella bisaccia.

(Bisaccia is an old-fashioned word for a kind of bag that peasants used to have. The most common modern-day Italian word for bag is borsa, which appears to be of Greek origin. However, if you're talking about a backpack, the kind that school kids wear, you would normally say zaino, which is a Germanic loanword.)

Now, do you see how similar Sardinian is to Latin? Especially compared to Italian? Yes, I know, this is just one sentence, and you could say that the person who wrote the Wikipedia article was cherry-picking, but it's just one of many examples.
 
Old 4 Weeks Ago #24
T.Garrett
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T.Garrett
Talking Stewart is out in the Meadow

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stewart Meadows View Post
The latter (i.e. the bolded part).
Why couldn't you just simply say you became familiar with Sardinian during your studies at ...I don't believe you said where?

Quote:
Yeah, maybe it's the medium...or maybe I'm just slower than the average person. (Could be.)
I was kidding but now I'm beginning to wonder ...

Quote:
You're entitled to your opinion, but I think that you're putting too much emphasis on the Semitic influence. It's not like Sardinian is some half-Romance/half-Semitic gutter language; it has a solid Latin base.
Like Maltese

Quote:
Even if you just take a quick look at some Sardinian texts or sentences, it almost immediately becomes apparent why it's considered the most conservative Romance language. Look at the following excerpt from the Wikipedia article that I linked to in one of my previous posts:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sardinian_language

In the Italian-language version of this Wikipedia page, the above sentence reads "Mettimi tre pani nella bisaccia". Now let's compare these languages to each other:

English: Put three loaves of bread in the bag for me.

Latin: Pone mihi tres panes in bertula.

Sardinian: Ponemi tres panes in bertula.

Italian: Mettimi tre pani nella bisaccia.

(Bisaccia is an old-fashioned word for a kind of bag that peasants used to have. The most common modern-day Italian word for bag is borsa, which appears to be of Greek origin. However, if you're talking about a backpack, the kind that school kids wear, you would normally say zaino, which is a Germanic loanword.)
Again with that wiki page, I expected more from someone who studied a language at university level. Some anecdotes regarding your studies, links to obscure pages about Romance languages on the web, some poetry.

There's huge volume of high quality verse in Romance languages ...but I get nothing. Nothing from Virgil, no Dante, no St Francis who wrote the first literature in Italian language (Umbrian dialect) Laudes Creaturarum none other than the Canticle of the Sun, which is a favorite of mine, no Ezra Pound who once called the English a slave race ruled by the jewish Rothschilds ...????

Just one sentence from a wikipedia article? You studied languages?

Quote:
Now, do you see how similar Sardinian is to Latin? Especially compared to Italian? Yes, I know, this is just one sentence, and you could say that the person who wrote the Wikipedia article was cherry-picking, but it's just one of many examples.
No I really don't see, Stewie. But I'm just breaking ballz. I'll stick to my opinion because you haven't shown me anything but a wiki article which you keep citing over and over and this is becoming redundant and boring.

Cheers bro, have a good one!
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Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres; unam partem incolunt Belgae ...

Last edited by T.Garrett; 4 Weeks Ago at 07:19 AM. Reason: I'm hung over and spelling is atrocious
 
Old 4 Weeks Ago #25
T.Garrett
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Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Manhasset, NY
Posts: 4,704
T.Garrett
Talking Texas Style Cotton Eye Joe ...or the BULLSHIT song



From the White American (Texas dialect) catalog of line dancin music, check it out
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Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres; unam partem incolunt Belgae ...

Last edited by T.Garrett; 4 Weeks Ago at 08:02 AM.
 
Old 4 Weeks Ago #26
Stewart Meadows
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Stewart Meadows
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T.Garrett View Post
Again with that wiki page (…) Just one sentence from a wikipedia article? You studied languages?
I linked to that Wikipedia article because it's filled with important information about the subject that we're discussing. I get the impression that you didn't read it or that you read it but didn't understand it.

But if you feel that that's not enough, then here's a link to a (small) Latin-Sardinian dictionary that you can read for free on the internet:

http://www.pittau.it/Sardo/voc/vocabolario.html

You can compare the two languages to each other and observe all the similarities. Of course, it helps if you also speak Italian because then it will become apparent why Sardinian is considered the most conservative Romance language (and thus the closest to Latin).
 
Old 4 Weeks Ago #27
T.Garrett
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Manhasset, NY
Posts: 4,704
T.Garrett
Talking ahhhh ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stewart Meadows View Post
I linked to that Wikipedia article because it's filled with important information about the subject that we're discussing. I get the impression that you didn't read it or that you read it but didn't understand it.

But if you feel that that's not enough, then here's a link to a (small) Latin-Sardinian dictionary that you can read for free on the internet:

http://www.pittau.it/Sardo/voc/vocabolario.html

You can compare the two languages to each other and observe all the similarities. Of course, it helps if you also speak Italian because then it will become apparent why Sardinian is considered the most conservative Romance language (and thus the closest to Latin).
I read the article and understand it, I just don't agree with it. I gave the reasons why I don't agree and you responded 'well, that's your opinion' so as far as I'm concerned discussion over.

Thanks for the link to the dictionary, and no I don't speak Italian I only understand a little from being around folks who are fluent in the language here in NYC.

I'll check it out when I have a little more time I'm in the process of putting my boat in the water for the season and need to do a few upgrades on the electrical system and the electronics so I'll be busy with that for awhile. My 'black hole' in the water.

BTW I asked my goombah at [email protected] if he knew of a good Sardinian red ...I buy this Tuscan Sangiovese to drink with my friends there, he's getting a few bottles that I'll put on the table this weekend and see if I hear a "get the fuck outta here" over supper.

Ciao for now buddy
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Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres; unam partem incolunt Belgae ...

Last edited by T.Garrett; 4 Weeks Ago at 12:25 AM.
 
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