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Old August 23rd, 2013 #41
Alex Linder
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Have archaeologists discovered the grave of Alexander the Great? Experts find enormous marble tomb fit for a king under a massive mound in Greece

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...ng-Greece.html
 
Old August 25th, 2013 #42
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Arrow Oldest globe of New World discovered on ostrich eggs


Scientists have discovered the world's oldest globe of the New World, dating back to the early 1500s - and it is carved onto ostrich eggs.

The previously-unknown globe, which is about the size of a grapefruit, was made from the lower halves of two ostrich eggs, and dates from the very early 1500s.

Until now, it was thought that the oldest globe to show the New World was the "Lenox Globe" at the New York Public Library, but researchers said that this Renaissance ostrich egg globe was actually used to cast the copper Lenox globe, putting its date to 1504 AD.

The globe reported in The Portolan, the journal of the Washington Map Society, reflects the knowledge gleaned by Christopher Columbus and other very early European explorers including Amerigo Vespucci after whom America was named.

The author points to Florence Italy as where the globe was made, and offers evidence that the engraver was influenced by or worked in the workshop of Leonardo da Vinci.

"When I heard of this globe, I was initially sceptical about its date, origin, geography and provenance, but I had to find out for myself," said author S Missinne, an independent Belgian research scholar in the journal article.

"After all no one had known of it, and discoveries of this type are extremely rare. I was excited to look into it further, and the more I did so, and the more research that we did, the clearer it became that we had a major find," he said.

The globe was purchased in 2012 at the London Map Fair from a dealer who said it had been in an "important European collection" for many decades.

The current owner made it available to the author for his research, which included scientific testing of the globe itself, computer tomography testing, and carbon dating, assessment of the ink used to colour its engraved surface, and close geographical, cartographic, and historical analysis.

IndianExpress.com
 
Old August 25th, 2013 #43
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Arrow Ancient Priestess Unearthed In Peru; Tomb Suggests Women Ruled Mysterious, Brutal Culture


Talk about ancient girl power!

Archaeologists working in Peru have uncovered the skeleton of a woman believed to have been a high priestess of a mysterious culture that existed around 1,200 years ago. The pre-Hispanic remains were found in late July in an impressive burial chamber located in the country's northern Chepan province, according to the Agence France-Presse.

The priestess seems to have been a leader of an ancient culture known as the Moche, or Mochia. Around 2,000 years ago, the Moche dominated the cultural landscape of what is now northern Peru, building large pyramids from mud bricks before disappearing without explanation. The name Moche comes from the site of Moche, an ancient capital city.

Researchers have spent years attempting to unravel the riddles of a society which left no written record. According to the BBC, illustrations show the Moche engaged in brutal bouts of ritualized combat that ended with the losers being sacrificed.

The priestess discovered in Chepan was buried with child and adult human sacrifices, AFP reports. She joins the list of several other priestesses who have been found in northern Peru in the past few years.

"This find makes it clear that women didn't just run rituals in this area but governed here and were queens of Mochica society," project director Luis Jaime Castillo told AFP. "It is the eighth priestess to be discovered. Our excavations have only turned up tombs with women, never men."

Arguably the most important of these was an elaborately-tattooed female mummy discovered in a burial chamber filled with treasure and weapons. Announced to the public in 2006, the Moche mummy was later dubbed the "Lady of Cao" and is believed to have been a leader of the civilization between 1,700 and 1,600 years ago before dying in childbirth, according to the site Living in Peru. At the time, archaeologists said the discovery of the Lady of Cao was similar in significance to the discovery of King Tut's tomb in Egypt, according to National Geographic.

HuffPost.com
 
Old August 26th, 2013 #44
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Default Secrets of Beowulf revealed: Relics discovered at Danish feasting hall which featured in Britain's oldest epic poem

The real-life medieval society which spawned the epic poem Beowulf is coming to light in a series of ground-breaking discoveries centred around the royal court of sixth-century Denmark.

The poem, one of the oldest literary works written in English, tells the story of how the hero Beowulf defeats the monster Grendel, who has been terrorising the royal hall of Heorot.

The fiend is attracted to the court by the sound of feasting - and excavations in the area thought to have inspired the poem have revealed that it did indeed host feasts on an epic scale.


Archaeologists are currently working in on a site in Lejre, in eastern Denmark, which was the centre of one of the most powerful Viking kingdoms from the sixth to the 10th century.

The town is considered by scholars to be the most likely site of Heorot, the hall of King Hrothgar, where the events of Beowulf are set.

In the Anglo-Saxon epic, composed some time before the 11th century, the monster Grendel repeatedly attacks Heorot after becoming enraged by the sound of feasting.

The Danish court is powerless to guard against the beast until the arrival of Beowulf, from the land of the Geats in modern-day Sweden, who kills Grendel and then descends under the sea and defeats the monster's mother.


The extent to which the events of the poem are based on historical fact is controversial, but it seems to have been inspired by the wealthy Danish court at Lejre.

And the current excavations have confirmed that giant feasting halls were an integral part of life at Lejre, according to a progress report published in BBC History magazine.

Archaeologists have found a total of seven halls dating from various points between 500 and 1000, implying that the structures were periodically torn down and rebuilt.

The earliest of all the halls, located 500m from all the others, is the one most likely to have provided the historical inspiration for Heorot.

On the site there are the remains of hundreds of animals apparently killed and eaten at massive feasts, as recounted in the poem.

The animals include cattle, sheep, suckling pigs, goats, chicken, geese, ducks, deer and fish - implying that the Scandinavian elite enjoyed a diverse and luxurious diet.

Pottery drinking vessels have also been found on the site, as well as up to 40 pieces of jewellery made from precious metals.

'For the first time, archaeology is giving us a glimpse of life in the key royal Danish site associated with the Beowulf legend,' said Tom Christensen, of the Roskilde Museum.

The area is thought to have been largely isolated from the rest of Europe, as the Norsemen did not convert to Christianity until the 10th century.

However, excavators at Lejre have found an animal jawbone which they believe belonged to a brown bear given to the Danish ruler by another European king.

Despite its historic importance, Lejre is now a town of just 2,000 on the island of Zeeland, 23 miles west of Copenhagen.

Officials plan to issue a full report on their finds next year, when the exhibits will go on show at local museums
DailyMail
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Old August 28th, 2013 #45
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Default Stone Age hunter-gatherers were also traders, scientists state

Stone Age hunter-gatherers in Europe may have been trading with settled farmers as long as 7,000 years ago -- acquiring pigs to supplement their hauls of wild boar, scientists said Tuesday.

A study in the journal Nature Communications claims to provide the first evidence of live animal trade between the indigenous, nomadic Ertebolle hunters of northern Europe and more advanced, settled farmers who originally came from the Fertile Crescent -- today's Turkey, Syria and Iraq.

"Hunters and farmers were not only acquainted with each other but even traded live animals," said a statement from Germany's Kiel University, which contributed to the study.

The hunter-gatherers lived off seals and wild boar on the western Baltic coast, while the farmers cultivated crops and livestock south of the Elbe River that runs through central Europe.

The two groups are believed to have made sporadic contact, as suggested by excavated axes and pottery resembling those of the farmers at hunter-gatherer settlements, but the nature and extent of the exchanges remain a mystery.

There has been no previous evidence that the hunters had access to any domestic animals other than dogs.

For the new study, a team analyzed DNA from pig remains unearthed at different Ertebolle settlements. They found the swine had maternal ancestors from the Middle East, like the domestic pigs of their farmer neighbors across the river.

"Members of the Mesolithic (middle Stone Age) Ertebolle culture already had domestic pigs as early as 4,600 B.C., although they were -- as hunters and gatherers -- not yet familiar with animal husbandry," said the statement.

"Ertebolle hunter-gatherers acquired domestic pigs of varying size and coat color, added the study.

Some of the Ertebolle pigs had a light-colored coat with black spots -- a typical feature of domesticated swine and completely different to the inconspicuous grey coat of the wild boar they would have been more familiar with.

The researchers concluded that the two groups likely traded with one another, though they could not rule out livestock theft as a possible explanation.

"Although it is unclear why the Ertebolle sought domestic pigs, both large and small pigs with multicolored coats would likely have seemed strange and exotic compared with the more familiar appearance of the locally available wild boar they traditionally hunted," the team reported.

Their acquaintance with domestic pigs did not immediately revolutionize the hunter-gatherer lifestyle, however.

The Ertebolle continued hunting wild prey for hundreds of years after they started raising a few domestic pigs, before finally settling down to farm full-time.

The study also showed that domestic pigs were present in the region some 500 years earlier than previously thought.

Discovery.com
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Old August 29th, 2013 #46
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Default Canaanite Ritual Stone Discovered in Northern Israel


An archaeological discovery in the Tel Rechesh excavations at the Tabor River Reserve in northern Israel: a joint archaeological expedition, which included researchers from the University of Tenri, Japan, and the Institute of Archaeology of Galilee Kinneret Academic College, have unearthed a Canaanite cult ritual stone.


The excavations in this area have been going on for six years now. The same excavations also revealed large parts of a Jewish farmhouse dating back to the Second Temple. Researchers were able to establish that this was a place of Jewish dwellers based on typical stone tools, oil lamps and coins minted in the city of Tiberias.

“The diggers received a big surprise,” said Chairman of the Institute of Archaeology of Galilee Kinneret Academic College Dr. Mrdechai Avi’am. “In the ruins of the second floor of the farmhouse, they discovered a Canaanite cult statue, similar to a statue that stood in the sanctuary of a temple which is yet to be located.”

“Similar stones have been discovered in a number of Canaanite sites, such as Hazor,” Dr. Avi’am said. “The same stone was later used as part of a doorframe in one of the rooms of the Jewish structure. This is the unique development of archaeological hills in Israel, where successive generations mingle ritual objects on their way from the world of the Canaanite mythology to monotheism.”

Read more at: h ttp://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/canaanite-altar-discovered-in-northern-israel/2013/08/28/
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Old August 29th, 2013 #47
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Originally Posted by jae manzel View Post
Researchers were able to establish that this was a place of Jewish dwellers based on typical stone tools, oil lamps and coins minted in the city of Tiberias.

“The diggers received a big surprise,” said Chairman of the Institute of Archaeology of Galilee Kinneret Academic College Dr. Mrdechai Avi’am. “In the ruins of the second floor of the farmhouse, they discovered a Canaanite cult statue, similar to a statue that stood in the sanctuary of a temple which is yet to be located.”
This doesn't make a lot of sense. First the writer conclusively claims they were jewish farmers, and then soon after writes that they were cult worshipers, which would make them non-jews.

At any rate, it's important to note that the Zionist entity thugs destroy archeological sites when the evidence points toward Arab settlement on the location. The kikes must eternally prop-up the false myth that it's their land, which it isn't at all. The people calling self-identifying themselves as jews are usurpers of an ancient identity that has long since vanished.
 
Old September 4th, 2013 #48
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Discovery of 5,000-year-old skull 'in fabulous condition' on side of river sparks mystery as archaeologists claim it would not have survived in water


A 5,000-year-old human skull in 'fabulous' condition has been discovered on the banks of a river in Worcershire by a walker who thought it was a coconut.

Experts said the piece of ancient skull is an 'exceptional find' as the intricate marks from blood vessels are still visible on the inner surface.

The smooth dark outer side gives only a tantalising glimpse as to what the person may have looked like, although there are 'tentative' suggestions it may have belonged to a woman in middle age living in the Neolithic period - around the time Stonehenge was built.




Remarkable discovery: Nick Daffern, senior archaeologist with Worcestershire Archaeology holds the 5,000-year-old skull which has baffled experts



Signs: The upper piece of skull's grey appearance indicated it was from ancient times. Carbon dating confirmed it is about 5,000 years old


The skull is not only prompting questions about the person it belonged to, but where it may have come.

A dog walker first stumbled across the skull piece, which is about 15cms (6ins) in length and 10cm (4ins) in width, earlier this year but initially thought it was a ball or a coconut shell.

Detectives from West Mercia Police investigated the scene and contacted experts at Worcestershire Archaeology, who sent the skull to be radiocarbon dated.

'When I first saw the skull, I thought it may have been Anglo-Saxon or Roman but I knew that it was not recent due to the colour,' said Nick Daffern, senior archaeologist.

'But we were all surprised when the radiocarbon dating put it at between 3,338 BC and 3,035 BC, or about the middle Neolithic period.'

'It is so well preserved, it is unthinkable that this had been in the river for any length of time which begs the question as to where it has come from.
'We know of Roman, Saxon and medieval burials along the river, but this is very rare - it is an exceptional find.




Just the beginning: Experts say this find suggests there is an ancient burial site near the site of the skull by the Avon river in Worcestershire


'What it suggests is that we have a Neolithic burial site very near here - we just don’t know where.'

He said: 'I don’t think it was found where the remains were buried, I think we’ve got a riverside burial and then flooding has brought this down the river.

'Finding that burial site though would be like finding a needle in a haystack.'

Mr Daffern said that without the rest of the skeleton it was difficult to draw conclusions about the person found, and certainly there is no clue as to how they met their death.

'Both myself and a forensic anthropologist believe it is a woman due to the slightness of the skull and the lack of any brow ridges although our conclusions are very tentative because we’re dealing only with the top of a skull,' he added.

'There’s no trauma to the bone, and where it has broken those are natural breaks, nor is there any sign of disease so we’ve no idea as to cause of death.

'The natural fusion of the bone in the skull leads me to believe it may be an older woman, possibly in her 50s, but that is very tentative again.

'Unfortunately, it remains a bit of a mystery.'

The find is a few miles from Bredon Hill, which has been a scene of human activity down the ages and still boasts the earthen ramparts of what was an Iron Age hill fort, however finds of Neolithic remains are rare.

'Whenever we come across Neolithic remains, there seems to be a solid dividing line between where they buried their dead, and where they lived and that is no accident,' he said.

'But it is frustrating as an archaeologist because although we have the physical evidence, we still don’t have the answers as to why.'

The skull is only the second set of Neolithic remains to be found in the county, although two large 6,000-year-old ‘halls of the dead’ were found in nearby Herefordshire this year but without any human remains present.


Discovery of 5,000-year-old skull 'in fabulous condition' sparks mystery | Mail Online
 
Old September 4th, 2013 #49
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Default Ancient horse and camel fossils unearthed in oklahoma

The fossilized remains of horses and camels dating back up to 12 million years have been unearthed in Oklahoma.

The fossils were unearthed by a sharp-eyed heavy-machine operator working for a Houston, Texas-based oil firm, Apache Corp.

The worker had scraped away about 20 feet of earth in July in the Packsaddle Wildlife Management Area, just north of the Canadian River in Ellis County, when he spied the fossils.

Experts were called in, with a team of paleontologists and archaeologists so far uncovering 13 separate pits containing fossil bones.

The Oklahoman newspaper reports that the fossils of extinct species date from five million to 12 million years ago.

The highlight to date has been the unearthing of a well-preserved horse skull far tinier than its present-day descendant.




The remains are typical prey animals from the Late Miocene period.

The curator of vertebrate paleontology for the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, Nicholas Czaplewski, said it could take years to sort through the fossil discoveries.

The remains will be compared with known species whose fossil remains have already been identified in the region. The new finds may help experts learn about the anatomy of existing species.

Horsetalk.co.nz
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Old September 10th, 2013 #50
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Default Seventh-century treasures discovered at foot of Temple Mount

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Gold and silver coins and jewelry dated from the seventh century were discovered at an excavation at the foot of the Temple Mount, Hebrew University researchers said.

The discovery of the two bundles of treasure at the Temple Mount’s southern wall, at the Ophel excavation site, was announced Monday by the researchers.

The artifacts can be dated to the late Byzantine period, or early seventh century CE.

Eilat Mazar, a Hebrew University of Jerusalem archaeologist, made the discovery during summer excavations and called it “a breathtaking, once-in-a-lifetime discovery.” Mazar believes the bundles were abandoned during the Persian conquest of Jerusalem in 614 CE.

They include 36 gold coins, gold and silver jewelry, and a gold medallion etched with the Temple menorah, shofar and Torah scroll. The medallion likely was a Torah scroll ornament.

“We have been making significant finds from the First Temple Period in this area, a much earlier time in Jerusalem’s history, so discovering a golden seven-branched menorah from the seventh century CE at the foot of the Temple Mount was a complete surprise,” Mazar said in a statement.

Read more: ht tp://www.jta.org/2013/09/09/news-opinion/israel-middle-east/seventh-century-coins-jewelry-discovered-at-foot-of-temple-mount#ixzz2eUXuam4I

From:telegraph.co.uk


Byzantine-era gold hoard unearthed in Jerusalem
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Old September 10th, 2013 #51
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Default Metal ring found in an Irish field turns out to be 10th century silver bracelet

A man who ignored his wife’s request to bin a dirty piece of metal he found in a field has been toasting his instincts after it was declared to be a rare silver piece of Viking jewellery.

David Taylor, 42, from County Down, in Northern Ireland, discovered the 45g silver artefact in a field near Kircubbin on the Ards peninsula and phoned a nearby museum to ask for advice.

Following an inquest hearing at a Belfast court, the jewellery was found to be an arm ring, traditionally worn around a Viking's bicep, and was dated back to between 950 and 1100 AD and has now been sent for valuation by experts at the UK Treasure Valuation Committee.



The UK Treasure Valuation Committee could not give an indication as to how much the arm ring was worth.

For reference, however, a haul of Viking silver and jewellery found in 1998 was valued at more than a million pounds, although that included various cups, bracelets and coins.

During an inquest, the arm ring was found to be at least 90 per cent silver, which is what led researchers to believe it was of Viking origin.

It was said to match the shape and material make-up of other Viking jewellery found.

Experts from the University College Cork believe the ring originated in Shetland or the Orkney isles, which at the time were ruled by Viking leaders including Thorfinn the Skull Splitter.


This means such finds are rare in Ireland.

As well as a piece of jewellery, experts believe the ring was also used as an early form of currency before a coinage system became widespread in Viking cultures.

At almost 45 grams, the ring is close to the weight of two Viking ounces.

The metal object was first spotted lying on a stone found in a field owned by Taylor's brother-in-law, Andrew Coulter.

Taylor, who was helping Coulter remove stones from the field at the Inishargy Road, said he was glad he did not listen to his wife Lynda who claimed the piece was junk.

'She thought it was a bull ring and said ‘throw that in the bin’,' he laughed after the ruling at a special treasure trove inquest hearing at Belfast coroner’s court.
'I just knew by the shape of it, it was something.

John Sheehan, archaeologist from the university told coroner Suzanne Anderson that the field where the ring was found lay close to the remains of a medieval church.

He explained that religious sites were often used as a storage place for valuable items.

With clashes between Viking settlers and native Irish commonplace, the expert suggested the ring may have been taken out of Scandinavian hands.

'Maybe it fell into Irish hands and as a result of that ended up deposited for safe-keeping at a church site but then got lost,' he said.

Dailymail
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Old September 12th, 2013 #52
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New passage-tomb discovery near Newgrange

Details of the “first passage-tomb to be discovered in in Boyne Valley in 200 years” have been reported in the Sept 7 edition of the Meath Chronicle. It was recently discovered along with many other previously unknown features by archaeologists using light detection and ranging imaging (LiDAR).

The archaeologists, led by Kevin Barton, have called for a fully comprehensive research project in order to fully assess the results of the entire LiDAR survey performed in and around the Brú na Bóinne UNESCO World Heritage Site.




New central mound with outer enclosure feature and further elongated feature to the east of the site.

Warranted further investigation

The “new” passage-tomb, on the floodplain of the Boyne southwest of Newgrange, had showed up on LiDAR imagery of the valley, Mr. Barton said. Because of its situation in proximity to the Boyne monuments, it was considered that the feature warranted further work.

The site was given the designation “LP2” by investigating archaeologists. In the LiDAR image it appeared there was a central mound with a circular outer enclosure feature. The enclosure was “faint but identifiable” in the image.

Further work, in the form of ground-probing techniques called Magnetic Gradiometry and Resistivity was carried out, and revealed what appeared to be a weakly defined outer enclosure in addition to a distinct passage/chamber arrangement of the passage-tomb aligned towards the north-northeast.

Archaeologists became excited about the central mound, which they said “appears to show a clear passage and chamber arrangement with splayed terminals at the NNE. The central mound is clearly identifiable and measures c. 30m in diameter. This strongly suggests that the feature represents a hitherto unknown passage tomb.”

Save Newgrange is calling on Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Jimmy Deenihan, to designate the tomb a national monument in order to ensure its protection, as it lies on private land south of Newgrange, near the Boyne river.




Magnetic gradiometry of Site LP2 with resistivity overlay. Note weakly defined outer enclosure and passage/ chamber arrangement aligned in NE/SW direction.



Read more here: Mythical Ireland

Boyne Valley Landscapes Project Phase III Summary Report


New passage-tomb discovery near Newgrange : Archaeology News from Past Horizons
 
Old September 13th, 2013 #53
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Default Ancient tomb of China's ‘first female PM’ discovered

The ancient tomb of a woman described as China’s “first female prime minister” has been discovered.

Archaeologists confirmed this week that a tomb discovered recently near an airport in Xianyang, Shaanxi province, belonged to Shangguan Wan’er, one of the most powerful women in China’s history, who lived from AD664-710.

As well as being a renowned politician, she was also a respected poet, and a trusted aide of China’s first female ruler, Empress Wu Zetian, during the Tang dynasty.

The grave was described as a major discovery, despite it being badly damaged. “The roof had completely collapsed, the four walls were damaged, and all the tiles on the floor had been lifted up,” Geng Qinggang, an archaeology research associate in Shaanxi, told Chinese media, according to the BBC.

“Hence, we think it must have been subject to large-scale, organised damage, quite possibly damage organised by officials,” he said

Independent.co.uk
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Old September 18th, 2013 #54
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Default Biblical-Era Town Discovered May Be City in Mark


A town that reportedly dates back to more than 2,000 years ago, has been discovered on the northwest coast of the Sea of Galilee, in the Ginosar valley in Israel. Yahoo reports that Ken Dark, of the University of Reading in the U.K, whose team discovered the town during a field survey, says the ancient town may be Dalmanutha, described in the Gospel of Mark as the place Jesus sailed to after miraculously feeding 4,000 people by multiplying a few fish and loaves of bread.

Mark says that after feeding 4,000 people by miraculously multiplying a few fish and loaves of bread, Jesus “got into the boat with his disciples and went to the region of Dalmanutha. The Pharisees came and began to question Jesus. To test him, they asked him for a sign from heaven. He sighed deeply and said, ‘Why does this generation ask for a sign? Truly I tell you, no sign will be given to it.’Then he left them, got back into the boat and crossed to the other side.” (Mark 8:10-13, NIV)

The Christian Science Monitor reports that the archaeological team also determined that a boat, dating to around 2,000 years ago, that was uncovered in 1986, was found on the shoreline of the newly discovered town. The boat was reported on two decades ago but the discovery of the town just now provides information on what lay close to it. The evidence suggests the town was quite prosperous in ancient times. Dark wrote in an article published in the most recent edition of the journal Palestine Exploration Quarterly, “Vessel glass and amphora hint at wealth.” They also discovered that “weights and stone anchors, along with the access to beaches suitable for landing boats — and, of course, the first-century boat … all imply an involvement with fishing.”

The archaeologists found that some fields between the modern town of Migdal and the coast contained numerous pottery pieces dating from as early as the second or first century B.C. to up to some point after the fifth century A.D., around the time of the Byzantine Empire. The architectural remains and pottery suggest that Jews and those following a polytheistic religion lived side by side in the community and that the town survived for many centuries. The researchers found that the southern side of the newly discovered town lies only about 500 feet away from another ancient town known as Magdala.

The archaeologists found many examples of ancient architectural remains, some of which the modern-day townspeople had made seats or garden ornaments out of, or just left lying on the ground. In one instance, the researchers found over 40 basalt ashlar blocks in one garden. Among their finds were cubes called tesserae and limestone vessel fragments, which were “associated with Jewish purity practices in the early Roman period,” indicating the presence of a Jewish community in the town, Dark told LiveScience in an email.

The finds also included a pagan altar, made of light-gray limestone and used in religious rituals by those of a polytheistic faith, Dark said. Discoveries also included a number of ancient column fragments, including examples of column capitals carved in the Corinthian style.

“This settlement may have contained masonry buildings, some with mosaic floors and architectural stonework.”, Dark wrote in his paper.

“It’s likely that the newly found town’s name is among the few locations already identified by other researchers relating to the Ginosar valley shore, and one of those places is Dalmanutha.”, Dark said.

http://www.webpronews.com/biblical-e...n-mark-2013-09
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Old September 21st, 2013 #55
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Skeleton of Ancient Prince Reveals Etruscan Life




The skeletonized body of an Etruscan prince, possibly a relative to Tarquinius Priscus, the legendary fifth king of Rome from 616 to 579 B.C., has been brought to light in an extraordinary finding that promises to reveal new insights on one of the ancient world’s most fascinating cultures.

Found in Tarquinia, a hill town about 50 miles northwest of Rome, famous for its Etruscan art treasures, the 2,600 year old intact burial site came complete with a full array of precious grave goods.

“It’s a unique discovery, as it is extremely rare to find an inviolate Etruscan tomb of an upper-class individual. It opens up huge study opportunities on the Etruscans,” Alessandro Mandolesi, of the University of Turin, told Discovery News. Mandolesi is leading the excavation in collaboration with the Archaeological Superintendency of Southern Etruria.

PHOTOS: See an Ancient Estruscan Prince in Death

A fun loving and eclectic people who among other things taught the French how to make wine, the Romans how to build roads, and introduced the art of writing into Europe, the Etruscans began to flourish around 900 B.C., and dominated much of Italy for five centuries.

Known for their art, agriculture, fine metalworking and commerce, the Etruscans begun to decline during the fifth century B.C., as the Romans grew in power. By 300-100 B.C., they eventually became absorbed into the Roman empire.

Since their puzzling, non-Indo-European language was virtually extinguished (they left no literature to document their society), the Etruscans have long been considered one of antiquity's great enigmas.

Indeed, much of what we know about them comes from their cemeteries.

Only the richly decorated tombs they left behind have provided clues to fully reconstruct their history.

Blocked by a perfectly sealed stone slab, the rock-cut tomb in Tarquinia appeared promising even before opening it.

Indeed, several objects, including jars, vases and even a grater, were found in the soil in front of the stone door, indicating that a funeral rite of an important person took place there.

As the heavy stone slab was removed, Mandolesi and his team were left breathless. In the small vaulted chamber, the complete skeleton of an individual was resting on a stone bed on the left. A spear lay along the body, while fibulae, or brooches, on the chest indicated that the individual, a man, was probably once dressed with a mantle.

At his feet stood a large bronze basin and a dish with food remains, while the stone table on the right might have contained the incinerated remains of another individual.

Decorated with a red strip, the upper part of the wall featured, along with several nails, a small hanging vase, which might have contained some ointment. A number of grave goods, which included large Greek Corinthian vases and precious ornaments, lay on the floor.

“That small vase has been hanging on the wall for 2,600 years. It’s amazing,” Lorenzo Benini, CEO of the company Kostelia, said.

Along with Pietro Del Grosso of the company Tecnozenith, Benini is the private investor who has largely contributed to the excavation.

Skeleton of Ancient Prince Reveals Etruscan Life : Discovery News
 
Old September 21st, 2013 #56
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Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
Oregon cave discovery sheds new light on American Stone Age

The discovery of 13,000-year-old stone projectiles and fossilized feces indicates the existence of a second founding culture in the Americas, in addition to the Clovis culture, say researchers.

By Jeff Barnard, Associated Press / July 13, 2012


Displayed in the hand of University of Oregon archaeologist Dennis Jenkins are three bases for Western Stemmed projectiles from the Paisley Caves in Oregon. The bases date to some 13,000 years ago.

Stone tools and human DNA from ancient caves in the western U.S. offer new evidence of how some of the first Americans may have spread through the continent from Asia: on two different routes, as shown by two different ways of making the tips of spears.

Archaeologists said Thursday that they have dated broken obsidian spear points from Paisley Caves in Oregon to about 13,200 years ago — as old as much different stone tools from the Clovis culture found in the southeast and interior U.S. And radio-carbon dating of human DNA from coprolites — ancient desiccated human feces — shows people lived in the caves as early as 14,300 years ago.

The dates indicate that the Clovis style of chipping stone was not the mother of Stone Age technology, as others have theorized, and that the two styles were developed independently by different groups, said Dennis Jenkins, an archaeologist with the University of Oregon's Museum of Natural and Cultural History who led the excavations.

Jenkins said the findings suggest those groups may have taken separate routes after crossing the Ice Age land bridge from Asia. Those making western stemmed projectiles may have gone down the coast, while the Clovis people traveled through an ice-free corridor in the interior U.S.

The findings by a team of scientists from the U.S., Britain and Denmark were reported online in the journal Science.

The Clovis culture is named for elegantly chipped stone points found at a site uncovered in 1929 near Clovis, New Mexico. The bases are distinctly concave where they were tied to the wooden shafts of spears or throwing darts for hunting. The style found in Oregon is known as western stemmed projectile points, for their thick bases and their discovery throughout the western U.S.

"The big 'aha!' here, or the primary significance of this is that ... we have demonstrated that these western stemmed tradition points are the same age as Clovis," Jenkins said in a teleconference with reporters. "There is no evidence of Clovis or any precursor to Clovis in the caves currently, and so that suggests that you've got here, at the exact same time, at least two technologies."

Until now, most western stemmed projectiles with accurate dating have been younger than Clovis artifacts, leading to theories the two technologies evolved from a single source. The new evidence goes against that idea. Jenkins said it appears more likely they evolved independently.

But not all experts are convinced.

David Meltzer, professor of prehistory at Southern Methodist University, said the study clearly showed western stemmed projectiles existed at the same time as Clovis. But he was not ready to say the stone points showed separate ancient migrations.

"Points are not people," he said. "Just because two ways of fashioning projectile points are different doesn't mean different populations any more than different groups of people drive Hummers rather than Priuses."

Jenkins and others reported in 2008 that they found coprolites in the Paisley Caves that dated back 14,300 years, the oldest radio-carbon-dated human DNA in North America. The DNA was genetically linked to people from Asia as well as modern Indians.

http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/201...ican-Stone-Age
Unless I missed it's mention in the article, did they or can they do a DNA test on the fecal matter? That would shed some light.
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Old September 23rd, 2013 #57
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Discovery of sacred Roman well amazes archaeology team



SPECTACULAR Ring with glass centre showing Neptune found in the Havant Roman well


IT’S the most significant archaeological discovery in the Portsmouth area for many years.

Buried a few feet under a garden in the centre of Havant, archaeologists stumbled upon a Roman well filled with coins and a bronze ring with a carving of Neptune, the Roman god of the sea.

Perhaps most intriguing was the discovery of eight dog skeletons at the bottom of the well.

Experts believe the dogs, which were worshipped in some ancient religions, may have been dropped down the ‘sacred well’ as a sacrifice to the gods.

The excavation was done at Homewell House, a Georgian property behind St Faith’s Church that is undergoing renovation.

Dr Andy Russel, from Southampton Archaeology Unit, told The News: ‘I would say it’s a pretty amazing find.

‘We have done a few sites in Havant before and found Roman bits and pieces but nothing on this scale of a beautifully constructed well with coins, a ring and this strange deposit of dogs in it.

‘I’ve never come across a deposit of dogs down a Roman pit or well before – it’s intriguing.’

The well, dated at between 250 and 280AD, is made of stone from the Isle of Wight.

Dr Russel added: ‘We have found post holes where people have put up buildings in the posts. There’s no sign of stone buildings. This is not a Fishbourne Roman Palace. Wooden buildings probably made up the settlement.’

The dogs showed wounds that had healed, indicating they may have been used for dog fighting.

Archaeologists believe the ring may have been dropped down the well by a Roman sailor, perhaps praying for safe passage home on the stormy seas.

Discovery of sacred Roman well amazes archaeology team - Portsmouth News
 
Old September 24th, 2013 #58
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All of the ancient mummies/skeletons found in China are Caucasiian. All of the ancient skeleton/mummies found in the Americas and Mexico are Caucasian. All of the ancient mummies/skeletons found in Africa (Egypt) are Caucasian. All of the ancient skeletons/mummies found in Europe are Caucasian. In terms of actual archaeological EVIDENCE, the DOG is a more ancient species than the artificial non-white races.

Guess how much evidence they actually have to prove that all other races evolved from the niggers? ZERO. They just made it up in that jewish way they have. There is no evidence anywhere on the planet that niggers actually even existed before historic times 3,000 years ago. There is, however, a massive amount of evidence to prove that the Aryans were the original race on the planet, and that white people are the holders of ALL knowledge, both then and now.
 
Old October 16th, 2013 #59
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Frogs' legs may have been English delicacy 8,000 years before France

Dig at Blick Mead, Wiltshire, a mile from Stonehenge, turns up bones of toad's leg dating to between 7596BC and 6250BC



Blick Mead, near Stonehenge, where a charred toad's leg was found.


If you're French, asseyez-vous, s'il vous plait. Archaeologists digging about a mile away from Stonehenge have made a discovery that appears to overturn centuries of received wisdom: frogs' legs were an English delicacy around eight millennia before becoming a French one.

The shock revelation was made public on Tuesday by a team which has been digging at a site known as Blick Mead, near Amesbury in Wiltshire.

Team leader David Jacques said: "We were completely taken aback."

In April they discovered charred bones of a small animal, and, following assessment by the Natural History Museum, it has been confirmed that there is evidence the toad bones were cooked and eaten. "They would have definitely eaten the leg because it would have been quite big and juicy," said Jacques.

The bones, from a Mesolithic site that Jacques is confident will prove to be the oldest continuous settlement in the UK, have been dated to between 7596BC and 6250BC.

And it's not just toads' legs. Mesolithic Wiltshire man and woman were enjoying an attractive diet. "There's basically a Heston Blumenthal menu coming out of the site," said Jacques. "We can see people eating huge pieces of aurochs, cows which are three times the size of a normal cow, and we've got wild boar, red deer and hazelnuts.

"There were really rich food resources for people and they were eating everything that moved but we weren't expecting frogs' legs as a starter."

The discovery is entertaining, but has a wider importance, said Jacques, as it adds to evidence that there was a near-3,000-year use of the site.

"People are utilising all these resources to keep going and it is clearly a special place for the amount of different types of food resources to keep them going all year round. Frogs' legs are full of protein and very quick to cook: the Mesolithic equivalent of fast food."

Jacques is senior research fellow in archaeology at the University of Buckingham which is funding a new dig on the site. He said it was looking increasingly likely that the site was the "cradle to Stonehenge" which was built around 5,000 years later.

Andy Rhind-Tutt, chairman of Amesbury museum and heritage trust, said: "No one would have built Stonehenge without there being something unique and really special about the area. There must have been something significant here beforehand, and Blick Mead, with its constant temperature spring sitting alongside the River Avon, may well be it.

"I believe that as we uncover more about the site over the coming days and weeks we will discover it to be the greatest, oldest and most significant Mesolithic home base ever found in Britain."

Frogs' legs may have been English delicacy 8,000 years before France | Science | The Guardian
 
Old October 29th, 2013 #60
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Exceptionally rare Roman statue unearthed in City of London building site



An “exceptional” Roman sculpture thought to have adorned the tomb of a wealthy man in the 1st or 2nd century AD has been found in the City of London, as archaeologists proclaim it the finest of its kind in the world.

The statue, which shows an eagle clasping a serpent in its beak, was found on the building site of a boutique hotel near Aldgate tube station, and will now go on display in the Museum of London.

Experts have hailed it as being among the finest Roman pieces ever discovered in Britain, and the best-preserved example of the eagle and snake motif in the world.

This statue, made from limestone from the Cotswolds, is believed to symbolise the struggle between good and evil, and triumph over death.

It is thought to have been commissioned for a “wealthy person of influence” in Roman London, and placed in an alcove at the mausoleum.

It was found as archaeologists explored a site at Minories, near to the Tower of London, ahead of a new 16-storey boutique hotel being built.

The area is known to have been a burial ground just outside the city walls, with a Roman road running nearby it.

The two-foot-tall sculpture was found in a ditch overlayed with pottery, around ten foot deep. Experts reported it came out of the ground "covered in soil and unrecognisable" in September, in the last few hours of an excavation that had lasted several months.

A spokeswoman for the Museum of London Archaeology, which worked on the dig, disclosed academics "were at first hesitant" to announce the find, with its "unbelievable condition" leading them to doubt its Roman origins.

Only one other example of a statue showing the design of the eagle and snake has ever been unearthed in Britain, and that is missing its head and feet. The motif also matches a design seen on a ring in the Cheapside Hoard.

Reverend Professor Martin Henig, a leading expert in the field, said that the object was "the finest sculpture by a Romano-British artist ever found in London and amongst the very best statues surviving from Roman Britain.

"Its condition is extraordinary; the carving is as crisp as on the day it was carved. All it has lost is the surface paint, probably washed away when it was deposited in a ditch."

Michael Marshall, finds specialist at Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA), added: "The eagle is a classically Roman symbol and this new find provides a fascinating new insight into the inhabitants of Roman London and demonstrates their familiarity with the iconography of the wider classical world.

"Funerary sculpture from the city is very rare and this example, perhaps from inside a mausoleum, is a particularly fine example which will help us to understand how the cemeteries and tombs that lined the roads out of the city were furnished and the beliefs of those buried there."

MOLA project manager Louise Davies said it was an archaeologist's "dream to find such a beautiful sculpture", adding: "The fact that we found it on the last day of the dig was a real bonus."

The object will go on display for six months at the Museum of London from Wednesday October 30.


Exceptionally rare Roman statue unearthed in City of London building site - Telegraph
 
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