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Old December 22nd, 2010 #1
SmokyMtn
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Default Books on Economics and Political Economy

Some favorites, in no particular order:


THE POLITICS OF OBEDIENCE: THE DISCOURSE OF VOLUNTARY SERVITUDE

ÉTIENNE DE LA BOÉTIE

http://mises.org/rothbard/boetie.pdf


Interesting Footnote, #19.

Thus, Tolstoy writes:

Quote:
The situation of the oppressed should not be compared to the constraint
used directly by the stronger on the weaker, or by a greater
number on a smaller. Here, indeed it is the minority who oppress
the majority, thanks to a lie established ages ago by clever people,
in virtue of which men despoil each other. . . .
Then, after a long quote from La Boétie, Tolstoy concludes,

Quote:
It would seem that the workers, not gaining any advantage from the
restraint that is exercised on them, should at last realize the lie in
which they are living and free themselves in the simplest and easiest
way: by abstaining from taking part in the violence that is only
possible with their co-operation
.
Leo Tolstoy, The Law of Love and the Law of Violence (New York: Rudolph
Field, 1948), pp. 42, 45.


Notice what Tolstoy is saying, the easiest way for us to remove ourselves from the heel of JOG is to simply walk away, not participate in, nor support the legitimacy of this JOG. This is exactly what I and others have been trying to get across to many of you who continue to fall for the illusion that "working within the system", such as the A3P advocates, will get you anywhere.

Conservatives vs. the Vanguard: Even Leo Tolstoy and Etienne de la Boetie is on the side of the Vanguard.

Last edited by SmokyMtn; December 22nd, 2010 at 05:53 PM.
 
Old December 22nd, 2010 #2
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Individual Liberty: Selections From the Writings of

BENJAMIN R. TUCKER

http://mises.org/books/individual_liberty_tucker.pdf


Quote:
The demand for something representative of Individualist Anarchism has become so insistent that it has been determined to produce at least one volume of the best matter available, and in that volume to'attempt to cover the whole subject. The nearest that any book ever came to answering that description is Tucker's "Instead of a Book", first published in 1893, culled from his writings in his periodical, Liberty, and out of print since 1908. This closely printed volume of nearly 500 pages was composed of questions and criticisms by his correspondents and by writers in other periodicals, all answered by the editor of Liberty in that keen, clear-cut style that was the delight of his adherents and the despair of his opponents.

In casting about for material for the proposed volume, therefore, no other writings than those of Benjamin R. Tucker could for a moment be considered, and it is no exaggeration to say that they stand high above everything else that has been written on the subject, not even excepting the works of Josiah Warren, Proudhon, and Lysander Spooner, or of any other person who has ever attempted to expound the principles of Individualist Anarchism.

Mr. Tucker is an educated and cultured man. His literary style is both fluent and elegant, his statements concise and accurate, his arguments logical and convincing, and his replies terse yet courteous. The reader is never at a loss to know what he means. There is not a word too much or too little. Every sentence is rounded and complete-not a redundant syllable or a missing punctuation mark. What he writes is a joy to read, even when the reader himself is the victim of his withering sarcasm or caustic satire.
 
Old December 22nd, 2010 #3
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It is remarkable to think that this seminal essay, the Origins of Money, by Carl Menger hasn’t been in print since 1892. Written in the same year that he testified before the Currency Commission in Austria-Hungary, Menger explains that it is not government edicts that create money but instead the marketplace. Individuals decide what the most marketable good is for use as a medium of exchange. “Man himself is the beginning and the end of every economy,” Menger wrote, and so it is with deciding what is to be traded as money.

“Money has not been generated by law. In its origin it is a social, and not a state institution. Sanction by the authority of the state is a notion alien to it. ”


http://mises.org/books/origins_of_money.pdf
 
Old December 22nd, 2010 #4
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Carl Menger

Quote:
In the beginning, there was Menger. It was this book that reformulated, and really rescued, economic science. It kicked off the Marginalist Revolution, which corrected theoretical errors of the old classical school. These errors concerned value theory, and they had sown enough confusion to make the dangerous ideology of Marxism seem more plausible than it really was.

Menger set out to elucidate the precise nature of economic value, and root economics firmly in the real-world actions of individual human beings.

Economics students still say that it is the best introduction to economic logic ever written. The book also deserves the status of a seminal contribution to science in general. Truly, no one can claim to be well read in economics without having mastered Menger's argument.

Menger advances his theory that the marginal utility of goods is the source of their value, not the labor inputs that went into making them. The implication is that the individual mind is the source of economic value, a point which started a revolution away from the flawed classical view of economics.

Menger also covers property, price, time, production, and wealth. On money, for example, it was Menger who so beautifully explained how it originates not in social contract or legislation but within the framework of the market economy.
http://mises.org/books/mengerprinciples.pdf

This essential work's contents include:

Foreword by Peter G. Klein
Introduction by F.A. Hayek
Translator's Preface
Author's Preface
I. The General Theory of the Good
1.The Nature of Goods
2.The Causal Connections Between Goods
3.The Laws Governing Goods-character
4.Time and Error
5.The Causes of Progress in Human Welfare
6.Property
II. Economy and Economic Goods
1.Human Requirements
2.The Available Quantities
3.The Origin of Human Economy and Economic Goods
4.Wealth
III. The Theory of Value
1.The Nature and Origin of Value
2.The Original Measure of Value
3.The Laws Governing the Value of Goods of Higher Order
IV. The Theory of Exchange
1.The Foundations of Economic Exchange
2.The Limits of Economic Exchange
V. The Theory of Price
1.Price Formation in an Isolated Exchange
2.Price Formation Under Monopoly
3.Price Formation and the Distribution of Goods under Bilateral Competition
VI. Use Value and Exchange Value

VII. The Theory of the Commodity
1.The Concept of the Commodity in its Popular and Scientific Meanings
2.The Marketability of Commodities
VIII. The Theory of Money
1.The Nature and Origin of Money
2.The Kinds of Money Appropriate to Particular Peoples and to Particular Historical Periods
3.Money as a "Measure of Price" and as the Most Economic Form for Storing Exchangeable Wealth
4.Coinage
Appendices
Goods and "Relationships"
Wealth
The Nature of Value
The Measure of Value
The Concept of Capital
Equivalence in Exchange
Use Value and Exchange Value
The Commodity Concept
Designations for Money
History of Theories of the Origin of Money
 
Old December 22nd, 2010 #5
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http://mises.org/books/capitalandinterest.pdf

Quote:
The great economist and finance minister of the Austro-Hungarian Empire is a pillar of the Austrian School. As a champion of the new marginalist school, this great work brought him more fame than even Carl Menger had in his day.

Here is the original English translation by Scottish economist William Smart, the one that had the largest impact on the American and British economic scene, and the one that remains lucid and penetrating. This edition is the first time it has been available in more than half a century.

With depth and lucidity, Boehm-Bawerk surveys and critiques failed theories of interest from antiquity to modern times, presents a full theory of the structure of production, and defends the importance of capital in production and time in the determination of the interest rate.

The broad implications of this work are being rediscovered today by younger Austrians building on his foundation for Austrian production theory. It's not only economics being addressed here. As Mises said, this voluminous treatise is the royal road to understanding of the fundamental political issues of our age.

The book is divided into seven parts: 1) The Development of the Problem, 2) The Productivity Theories, 3) The Use Theories, 4) The Abstinence Theory, 5) The Labour Theories, 6) The Exploitation Theory, 7) Minor Systems of Thought.

The goal of each section is to present the fairest possible case for the theory, examines its claims in detail, and finally reveals its most profound errors. The effect is to completely clear the field for his next book, The Positive Theory of Capital.
 
Old December 22nd, 2010 #6
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http://mises.org/books/capital-strigl.pdf


Quote:
Richard Ritter von Strigl (1891-1942) was one of the most brilliant Austrian economists of the interwar period. As professor at the University of Vienna he had a decisive influence on Hayek, Machlup, Haberler, Morgenstern, and other fourth-generation Austrian economists.

Very few classic works on capital and business cycles in the Austrian tradition have been translated from the original German. Now Strigl's important contribution to Austrian capital theory is brought to the English-speaking world for the first time. The book links Eugen von Bhm-Bawerk's production theory and Mises's business cycle theory, and gives a pathbreaking account of the role of consumers' goods within the structure of production.
 
Old December 22nd, 2010 #7
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Frederic Bastiat The Bastiat Collection-Volume 1
http://mises.org/books/bastiat1.pdf

Frederic Bastiat The Bastiat Collection-Volume 2
http://mises.org/books/bastiat2.pdf





In two volumes, here is The Bastiat Collection, the main corpus of his writings in English in a restored and elegant translation that includes some of the most powerful defenses of free markets ever written. This restoration project has yielded a collection to treasure. After years of hard work and preparation, we can only report that it is an emotionally thrilling moment to finally offer to the general public.

Claude Frédéric Bastiat was an economist and publicist of breathtaking intellectual energy and massive historical influence. He was born in Bayonne, France on June 29th, 1801. After the middle-class Revolution of 1830, Bastiat became politically active and was elected Justice of the Peace in 1831 and to the Council General (county-level assembly) in 1832. He was elected to the national legislative assembly after the French Revolution of 1848.

Bastiat was inspired by and routinely corresponded with Richard Cobden and the English Anti-Corn Law League and worked with free-trade associations in France. Bastiat wrote sporadically starting in the 1830s, but in 1844 he launched his amazing publishing career when an article on the effects of protectionism on the French and English people was published in the Journal des Economistes which was held to critical acclaim.

The bulk of his remarkable writing career that so inspired the early generation of English translators—and so many more—is contained in this collection.

If we were to take the greatest economists from all ages and judge them on the basis of their theoretical rigor, their influence on economic education, and their impact in support of the free-market economy, then Frédéric Bastiat would be at the top of the list.

As Murray N. Rothbard noted: "Bastiat was indeed a lucid and superb writer, whose brilliant and witty essays and fables to this day are remarkable and devastating demolitions of protectionism and of all forms of government subsidy and control. He was a truly scintillating advocate of an untrammeled free market."

These volumes bring together his greatest works and represents the early generation of English translations. These translators were like Bastiat himself, people from the private sector who had a love of knowledge and truth and who altered their careers to vigorously pursue intellectual ventures, scholarly publishing, and advocacy of free trade.

Thus does this collection, totally 1,000 pages plus extensive indexes, represent some of the best economics ever written. He was the first, and one of the very few, to be able to convincingly communicate the basic propositions of economics.

The vast majority of people who have learned anything about economics have relied on Bastiat or publications that were influenced by his work. This collection—possibly more than anything ever written about economics—is the antidote for economic illiteracy regarding such things as the inadvisability of tariffs and price controls, and everyone from the novice to the Ph.D. economist will benefit from reading it.

The collection consists of three sections, the first of which contains his best-known essays. In “That Which is Seen, and That Which is Not Seen,” Bastiat equips the reader to become an economist in the first paragraph and then presents the story of the broken window where a hoodlum is thought to create jobs and prosperity by breaking windows. Bastiat solves the quandary of prosperity via destruction by noting that while the apparent prosperity is seen, what is unseen is that which would have been produced had the windows not been broken.

Professor Jörg Guido Hülsmann credits Bastiat for discovering the counterfactual method, which allowed Bastiat to show that destruction (and a variety of government policies) is actually the path to poverty, not prosperity. This lesson is then applied to a variety of more complex cases and readers will never be able to deny that scarcity exists and will always—hopefully—remember that every policy has an opportunity cost. If nothing else, they will not believe—as is often claimed—that earthquakes, hurricanes, and wars lead to prosperity.

The remaining essays cover the important institutions of society—law, government, money, and capital—where Bastiat explains the nature of these institutions and disabuses the reader of all the common misconceptions regarding them.

The second section is Bastiat’s Economic Sophisms, a collection of 35 articles on the errors of protectionism broadly conceived. Here Bastiat shows his mastery of the methods of argumentation— using basic logic and taking arguments to their logical extreme—to demonstrate and ridicule them as obvious fallacies. In his “Negative Railroad” Bastiat argues that if an artificial break in a railroad causes prosperity by creating jobs for boatmen, porters, and hotel owners, then there should be not one break, but many, and indeed the railroad should be just a series of breaks—a negative railroad.

In his article “An Immense Discovery!” he asks, would it not be easier and faster simply to lower the tariff between points A and B rather than building a new railroad to transport products at a lower cost? His “Petition of the Candlemakers” argues in jest that a law should be passed to require that all doors and windows be closed and covered during the day to prevent the sun from unfairly competing with the makers of candles and that if such a law were passed it would create high-paying jobs in candle and candlestick making, oil lamps, whale oil, etc. and that practically everyone would profit as a result.

The third section is Bastiat’s Economic Harmonies which was hastily written before his death in 1850 and is considered incomplete. Here he demonstrates that the interests of everyone in society are in harmony to the extent that property rights are respected. Because there are no inherent conflicts in the market, government intervention is unnecessary. Here we find a powerful but sadly neglected defense of the main thesis of old-style liberalism: that society and economy are capable of self-managing. Unless this insight is understood and absorbed, a person can never really come to grips with the main meaning of liberty.

VOLUME I

Introduction by Mark Thornton
I. That Which Is Seen, and That Which Is Not Seen
1. The Broken Window
2. The Disbanding of Troops
3. Taxes
4. Theaters and Fine Arts
5. Public Works
6. The Intermediaries
7. Protectionism
8. Machinery
9. Credit
10. Algeria
11. Frugality and Luxury
12. He Who Has a Right to Work Has a Right to Profit
II. The Law
III. Government .
IV. What Is Money?
V. Capital and Interest
1. Introduction
2. Ought Capital to Produce Interest?
3. What Is Capital?
4. The Sack of Corn
5. The House
6. The Plane
7. What Regulates Interest?
VI. Economic Sophisms—First Series
Introduction
1. Abundance—Scarcity
2. Obstacle—Cause
3. Effort—Result
4. To Equalize the Conditions of Production
5. Our Products Are Burdened with Taxes
6. Balance of Trade
7. Petition of the Manufacturers of Candles
8. Differential Duties—Tariffs
9. Immense Discovery
10. Reciprocity
11. Nominal Prices
12. Does Protection Raise Wages?
13. Theory—Practice
14. Conflict of Principles
15. Reciprocity Again
16. Obstruction—The Plea of the Protectionist
17. A Negative Railway
18. There Are No Absolute Principles
19. National Independence
20. Human Labor—National Labor
21. Raw Materials
22. Metaphors
23. Conclusion
VII. Economic Sophisms—Second Series
1. Natural History of Spoliation
2. Two Systems of Morals
3. The Two Hatchets
4. Lower Council of Labor
5. Dearness—Cheapness
6. To Artisans and Workmen
7. A Chinese Story
8. Post Hoc, Ergo Propter Hoc
9. The Premium Theft—Robbery by Subsidy
10. The Tax Gatherer
11. Protection; or, The Three City Aldermen
12. Something Else
13. The Little Arsenal of the Free-Trader
14. The Right Hand and the Left
15. Domination by Labor
Index
VOLUME II

VIII. Harmonies of Political Economy (Book One)
To the Youth of France
1. Natural and Artificial Organization
2. Wants, Efforts, Satisfactions
3. Wants of Man
4. Exchange
5. Of Value
6. Wealth
7. Capital
8. Property—Community
9. Landed Property
10. Competition
Concluding Observations
IX. Harmonies of Political Economy (Book Two)
11. Producer—Consumer
12. The Two Aphorisms
13. Rent
14. Wages
15. Saving
16. Population
17. Private and Public Services
18. Disturbing Causes
19. War
20. Responsibility
21. Solidarity
22. Social Motive Force
23. Existence of Evil
24. Perfectibility
25. Relationship of Political Economy and Religion
Index
 
Old December 22nd, 2010 #8
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http://mises.org/books/mespm.pdf


Quote:
It is in fact the most important general treatise on economic principles since Ludwig von Mises's Human Action in 1949…. --Henry Hazlitt

Man, Economy, and State is Murray Rothbard's main work in economic theory. It appeared in 1962, when Murray was only 36 years old. In it Murray develops the entire body of economic theory, in a step by step fashion, beginning with incontestable axioms and proceeding to the most intricate problems of business cycle theory and fundamental breakthroughs in monopoly theory. And along the way he presents a blistering refutation of all variants of mathematical economics. The book has in the meantime become a modern classic and ranks with Mises's Human Action as one of the two towering achievements of the Austrian School of economics. In Power and Market, Murray analyzed the economic consequences of any conceivable form of government interference in markets. The Scholars Edition brings both books together to form a magnificent whole. --Hans-Hermann Hoppe

--

In 1972, this book was selling in hardback for $130-$150 in current dollars.
 
Old December 22nd, 2010 #9
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Lysander Spooner Let's Abolish Government
http://mises.org/books/spooner-text.pdf

Lysander Spooner (1808–1887) is the American individualist anarchist and legal theorist known mainly for setting up a commercial post office in competition with the government and thereby being shut down. But he was also the author of some of the most radical political and economic writings of the 19th century, and continues to have a huge influence on libertarian thinkers today. He was a dedicated opponent of slavery in all its forms — even advocating guerrilla war to stop it — but also a dedicated opponent of the federal invasion of the South and its postwar reconstruction.

This collection was selected personally by Murray Rothbard as his best work. It includes "Trial by Jury," which argues for the idea of jury nullification, that is, the right of the jury to reject the law under which a defendant is tried. It also includes his "Letter to Grover Cleveland," which remains one of the most rigorous pieces of political argument ever penned. Finally, it includes his classic work "No Treason," which argues that the U.S. Constitution is not a social contract at all and that it cannot bind the current generation.

Spooner was obviously a great dissident -- and one of the most brilliant thinkers of the 19th century and an American original. His influence has been quiet but very long and pervasive.
 
Old December 22nd, 2010 #10
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THE POLITICS OF OBEDIENCE: THE DISCOURSE OF VOLUNTARY SERVITUDE

ÉTIENNE DE LA BOÉTIE

http://mises.org/rothbard/boetie.pdf

One of the cornerstones of my life's philosophy.
__________________
Hope in reality is the worst of all evils because it prolongs the torments of man.
Friedrich Nietzsche
 
Old December 22nd, 2010 #11
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Vices Are Not Crimes: A Vindication Of Moral Liberty

By Lysander Spooner





Quote:
We are all indebted to Carl Watner for uncovering an unknown work by the great Lysander Spooner, one that managed to escape the editor of Spooner's Collected Works . Both the title and the substance of "Vices are not Crimes" highlight the unique role that morality and moral principle had for Spooner
among the anarchists and libertarians of his day. For Spooner was the last of the great natural rights theorists among anarchists, classical liberals, or moral theorists generally; the doughty old heir of the natural law-natural rights tradition of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was fighting a rear-guard battle against the collapse of the idea of a scientific or rational morality, or of the science of justice or of individual right. Not only had natural law and natural rights given way throughout society to the arbitrary rule of utilitarian calculation or nihilistic whim; but the same degenerative process had occurred among libertarians and anarchists as well. Spooner knew that the foundation for individual rights and liberty was tinsel if all values and ethics were arbitrary and subjective. Yet, even in his own anarchist movement Spooner was the last of the Old Guard believers in natural rights; his successors in the individualist-anarchist movement, led by Benjamin R. Tucker, all proclaimed arbitrary whim and might-makes-right as the foundation of libertarian moral theory. And yet, Spooner knew that this was no foundation at all; for the State is far mightier than any individual, and if the individual cannot use a theory of justice as his armor against State oppression, then he has no solid base from which to roll back and defeat it.
With his emphasis on cognitive moral principles and natural rights, Spooner must have looked hopelessly old-fashioned to Tucker and the young anarchists of the 1870s and 1880s. And yet now, a century later, it is the latters' once fashionable nihilism and tough amoralism that strike us as being
empty and destructive of the very liberty they all tried hard to bring about. We are now beginning to recapture the once-great tradition of an objectively grounded rights of the individual. In philosophy, in economics, in social analysis, we are beginning to see that the tossing aside of moral rights was not the brave new world it once seemed — but rather a long and disastrous detour in political philosophy that is now fortunately drawing to a close.

Opponents of the idea of an objective morality commonly charge that moral theory functions as a tyranny over the individual. This, of course, happens with many theories of morality, but it cannot happen when the moral theory makes a sharp and clear distinction between the "immoral" and the "illegal", or, in Spooner's words, between "vices" and "crimes." The immoral or the "vicious" may consist of a myriad of human actions, from matters of vital importance down to being nasty to one's neighbor or to willful failure to take one's vitamins. But none of them should be confused with an action that
should be "illegal," that is, an action to be prohibited by the violence of law. The latter, in Spooner's libertarian view, should be confined strictly to the initiation of violence against the rights of person and property. Other moral theories attempt to apply the law — the engine of socially legitimated violence — to compelling obedience to various norms of behavior; in contrast, libertarian moral theory asserts the immorality and injustice of interfering with any man's (or rather, any non-criminal man's) right to run his own life and property without interference. For the natural rights libertarian, then, his cognitive theory of justice is a great bulwark against the State's eternal invasion of rights — in contrast to other moral theories which attempt to employ the State to combat immorality.
 
Old December 22nd, 2010 #12
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Originally Posted by reltih145 View Post
One of the cornerstones of my life's philosophy.
You will like the other selections that I have posted.

For an understanding of economic theory, Menger and the other Austrian economists are highly recommended. It is unfortunate that the leading proponents of Menger's theory of economics has been taken over by the jews. I have only posted those books that expand on Menger's work.

On the political side, I have posted some books from American Individualist Anarchists from the 19th century, before the jews corrupted the theories of Individualist Anarchism around the turn of the century. These men of the 19th century took Thomas Jefferson's ideas of natural rights to a whole new level.

Over the last 25-30 years, I must have read over 400 books on economics and political economy.
 
Old December 22nd, 2010 #13
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No online version of this book is available. This is the story of two unemployed men, along with their Catholic priest, who set out to form what became one of the largest and most powerful co-operatives in the world today.

Instead of bitching about the political oppression they faced, they did something. Have not read this book in 20 years, but I do remember that their story is one that all of us should read, as we become forced to build our own co-operatives (PLEs) for our own survival, instead of continuing to bitch and moan about our current plight.



We Build the Road as We Travel
Mondragon, a cooperative social system
by Roy Morrison

Quote:
The Mondragon Cooperatives in the Basque region of Spain, at more than fifty years of age, remain the world's outstanding example of building a cooperative social system within the context of a now global market economy. This effort is foremost an adventure. It's an expression of individual and collective energies and dreams, as well as the requisite careful business practice of tens of thousands of cooperators engaged as social entrepreneurs.

What's most exciting, for me, about the Mondragon cooperatives is their daily wrestling with the dynamic tension between freedom and community—between the needs, rights and imperatives of the individual and the similar, and often conflicting, imperatives of the group. Mondragon's greatest social innovation and contribution has been the understanding, developed through hard work, sometime troubling experience, and innovative practice, that freedom and community are fundamentally interdependent and indivisible.

You cannot have true freedom without community; you cannot have true community without freedom. This means that at all times a balance must be found and struck between these essential, sometimes at odds, but ultimately complementary imperatives. Open discussion and democratic practice is the means to find this balance between the individual and the group, between one cooperative and the cooperative system, between the cooperative system and the Basque region , and so on. The cooperators have called this democratic process, this wrestling with the hard questions the pursuit of equilibrio—the search for dynamic balance and the heart of the matter. It is this process of struggle and discovery that is the engine for social change, the root of new prospects and possibilities, not just for the Mondragon cooperators, but for all of us.
 
Old December 22nd, 2010 #14
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Austrian Economics Home Study Course Audio Files

http://mises.org/resources/2022


For those of you who do not read books, here is a summary of most of the books on economics that I will be posting in audio form.

I have not listen to any of it, take what you can use and discard the rest.
 
Old December 22nd, 2010 #15
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Originally Posted by SmokyMtn View Post
We Build the Road as We Travel
Mondragon, a cooperative social system
by Roy Morrison
I truly believe that Distributism is the third way that we're looking for.
 
Old December 22nd, 2010 #16
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Originally Posted by SmokyMtn View Post
Austrian Economics Home Study Course Audio Files

http://mises.org/resources/2022


For those of you who do not read books, here is a summary of most of the books on economics that I will be posting in audio form.

I have not listen to any of it, take what you can use and discard the rest.
Interesting. I started VNN because I was tired of LewRockwell.com leaving the jew part off the explanation. Used to read that site every day, haven't in last year, after a decade of reading it daily.

I do think a very serious problem with WN is that generally they are about the level of Democrats when it comes to economic knowledge: they basically want the governement to do everything it does now, just with whites at the helm. But I think the great opportunity of our times will be combining radical decentralization (once the Great Dejewing is complete) with racial monoculture. I've called this White-Man-ism. Both the man and the race are important. Neither can be ignored. Neither can be exalted. Both must be respected in their proper sphere and proportion. White subsidiarity, as it were.
 
Old December 23rd, 2010 #17
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Default Distributism

"There are some Catholic conservatives who seem to think they are striking a blow for traditional Catholicism and against liberalism and the Enlightenment by opposing the free market and favoring some alternative--usually the so-called "distributism" of G.K. Chesterton and Hilaire Belloc, according to which that social system is best in which productive property is widely dispersed rather than concentrated. These two figures rightly enjoy great renown throughout the Catholic world for their outstanding writing on a variety of subjects, though of course they had no formal training in economics.

In 1871, Carl Menger had written his Principles of Economics, a work of profound genius that essentially launched the Austrian School of economics, but relatively few Catholics who spoke on the so-called "social question" made a serious attempt to reckon with it, or indeed were even aware of it. Those who have written on distributism in recent months appear to share in this ignorance, never once citing even a single economics text--as if a discipline that is devoted to the application of human reason to the problems of scarcity in the world could actually in itself be antagonistic to the Catholic faith.

http://mises.org/daily/1062
 
Old December 23rd, 2010 #18
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Originally Posted by Rick Ronsavelle View Post
Those who have written on distributism in recent months appear to share in this ignorance, never once citing even a single economics text
It's not called the dismal science for nothing. Establishment economists are generally as worthless as Women's Studies majors. I'm not saying it excuses ignorance, but you could spend years reading Keynesian texts and end up far stupider than when you started.
 
Old December 23rd, 2010 #19
SmokyMtn
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Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
Interesting. I started VNN because I was tired of LewRockwell.com leaving the jew part off the explanation. Used to read that site every day, haven't in last year, after a decade of reading it daily.

I do think a very serious problem with WN is that generally they are about the level of Democrats when it comes to economic knowledge: they basically want the governement to do everything it does now, just with whites at the helm. But I think the great opportunity of our times will be combining radical decentralization (once the Great Dejewing is complete) with racial monoculture. I've called this White-Man-ism. Both the man and the race are important. Neither can be ignored. Neither can be exalted. Both must be respected in their proper sphere and proportion. White subsidiarity, as it were.
Not only I used to read LewRockwell.com years ago, I was also a member of the private yahoo group where many of the leading Austrian Economists would discuss their latest ideas and projects.

My very last post in that user group, back in 2003, I lambasted them for not recognizing that racial separation is also a valid economic preference, and that Austrian Economics' weakest area is not recognizing that value judgement. I, too, stopped reading LewRockwell.com back in 2003.

Around the same time, on Stormfront, I was being called everything in the book, from being a jew to a race traitor, just for suggesting that White Nationalists study the science of Economics and for suggesting Rothbard's "Man, Economy, and State". Carl Menger's "Economic Principles" can be a hard read, but if one can get through Rothbard's book first, then they will be able to appreciate Menger's masterpiece that much better.

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It's not called the dismal science for nothing.
Economics is called a dismal science, not because of the inepitude of the establishment economists, instead it recieved that label, if I remember correctly, more so because of its reminder that there is no such thing as a free lunch. Been years since I have cracked open the books that I have posted thus far on this thread, but I know I can find the qoute in Mises' "Human Action".
 
Old January 2nd, 2011 #20
SmokyMtn
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One of the all time classics, now on audio......

 
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