Vanguard News Network
VNN Media
VNN Digital Library
VNN Reader Mail
VNN Broadcasts

Old October 29th, 2013 #61
alex revision
Senior Member
 
alex revision's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 16,627
alex revision
Default Aphrodite head found in ancient Hiérapolis

Aphrodite head found in ancient Hiérapolis



The head of an Aphrodite sculpture has been found during excavations at the Plutonium Inn in the ancient city of Hierapolis, according to the leader of the dig team. “We found a Dionysus sculpture. This sculpture has a body but no head; this is why the head of Aphrodite is very unique,” said the Italian head of the excavation team, Professor Francesco D’Andria. “It was made in the Hellenistic era; its face and hair show the Hellenistic style. It has holes for earrings.”

Previous discoveries at the city reveal that Hieropolis was visited as a holy place as early as 6 B.C.

Marble sculptures that were discovered during the recent excavations alongside the Aphrodite sculpture have been removed from the ancient city and are now being kept in the depot of the Hierapolis Archaeology Museum.

Archaeologists have been conducting excavations at the ancient city since 1957. (source)
 
Old November 22nd, 2013 #62
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default Biblical City Ruins Discovered UNDER Ruins Of Another Ancient City In Israel


An ongoing excavation in Israel has uncovered new evidence of an ancient city buried beneath the King Solomon-era metropolis of Gezer.

An international group of archaeologists has been working together for several years on the dig, located between modern-day Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, according to a statement released by the Israel antiquities Authority (IAA). An important historical city in its own right, Gezer is mentioned in both the Old Testament and in Egyptian historical accounts as a stop on the highway connecting ancient Egypt and Mesopotami.

This summer researchers unexpectedly had a breakthrough while examining a known part of the city dating back to the 10th century B.C., reports Israeli newspaper Haaretz. Led by Steven Ortiz of Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, and Samuel Wolff of the Israel Antiquities Authority, the team discovered traces of a walled city beneath those 10th-century ruins. The newly discovered remnants appeared to have been occupied 200 years earlier, during the Iron Age I period (between 1,200 and 1,000 B.C.), per a statement from the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.

"We had no evidence that Gezer was a walled city," Ortiz told The Huffington Post in an email. "Naturally a walled city implies that the city is more robust and powerful than an unwalled city. [Our discovery] is causing us to reinterpret the history and importance of the site in the Iron Age I. This city would be a major Canaanite city."


This Iron Age I city wall was about one meter thick, with several rooms attached. Digging through layers of dirt, Ortiz and Wolff found both Canaanite and Philistine artifacts, cultures mentioned in several prominent biblical stories including the battle between David and the fearsome Philistine Goliath.

The walled rooms also appeared to have been destroyed by force, which may explain how the city was able to escape detection for so long. The researchers believe this iteration of Gezer was torn down by Egyptian conquerors, and then the 10th-century city eventually was built on top of its ruins, according to Haaretz.

The fact that the biblical city of Gezer might have earlier ties to the Canaanite and Philistine groups may not come as a shock to experts familiar with the history of the region.

"It's not surprising that a city that was of importance in the biblical kingdoms of Israel and Judah would have an older history and would have played an important political and military role prior to that time," Andrew Vaughn, biblical scholar and executive director of the American Schools of Oriental Research, told LiveScience. "If you didn't control Gezer, you didn't control the east-west trade route."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/1...n_4297784.html


[visit link for picture slideshow]
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old November 22nd, 2013 #63
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default Ancient board game piece unearthed at Lyminge dig



The piece is made from a hollow cylinder of bone and has a central bronze rivet

A 7th Century board game piece, the first discovery of its kind for 130 years, has been unearthed in Kent by University of Reading archaeologists.


Researchers believe the hollow bone cylinder found at the Lyminge dig belongs to an early backgammon or draughts-type games set.

It was found in the remains of an Anglo-Saxon royal hall where board games were traditionally very popular.

Project leader Dr Gabor Thomas called it a "wonderfully evocative discovery".

She added: "Our excavation is providing an unprecedented picture of life in an Anglo-Saxon royal complex.

"Gaming, along with feasting, drinking, and music, formed one of the key entertainments of the Anglo-Saxon mead-hall as evoked in the poem Beowulf.

"The discovery of Anglo-Saxon gaming-pieces and gaming-boards has previously been restricted to male burials, particularly those of the Anglo-Saxon elite."

'Forging kingdoms'



The discovery took place at the archaeological excavation of a feasting hall in Lyminge

The last time a similar artefact was found was during the excavation of a barrow burial in Taplow, Buckinghamshire, in the 1880s.

The Lyminge piece, which is the first to be found in a "gaming setting", includes a central bronze rivet.

Common board games of the time were latrunculi and tabula, the aim of which was to capture the opponent's pieces.

Both came to England in the 5th Century during Anglo-Saxon migrations.

Also found nearby were items of jewellery, luxury glass, and pits with animal bones, suggesting that feasting and other ceremonial events took place at the site.

The building's foundations were first discovered in 2012.

Dr Thomas said: "By combining these fascinating structural remains with a stunning array of artefacts, our excavations are providing new insights into the role played by Anglo-Saxon royal complexes in forging kingdoms and royal dynasties during this key period in English history."

The dig will continue until summer 2014.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-25041254
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old November 22nd, 2013 #64
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default Trove of Religious Offerings Unearthed from Ancient Sanctuary in Turkey



These seals carved with religious inscriptions were found near the site of the ancient city of Doliche.

Archaeologists digging in southern Turkey say they've discovered more than 600 stamp seals, cylinder seals and amulets left as religious offerings in an ancient sanctuary.

Carved with images of animals, people, deities and geometric figures, the small artifacts date from the seventh to fourth centuries B.C. and were found near the site of the ancient city of Doliche, which has a long history of worship. Researchers think the place was revered as early as the Iron Age (around the beginning of the first millennium B.C.). It later became a famous sacred site of the Roman era, dedicated to Jupiter Dolichenus, the god of storms and weather, and then it was used as a Christian monastery.

People used stamp seals and cylinder seals to impress images into wet clay. These objects were sometimes used as a way to authenticate documents (in this case, tablets), but they also seem to have been used as religious offerings. [Images: Ancient Carving of Roman God]

"The amazingly large number proves how important seals and amulets were for the worshipping of the god to whom they were consecrated as votive offerings," excavation director Engelbert Winter, a professor at the University of Münster in Germany, said in a statement. "Such large amounts of seal consecrations are unheard-of in any comparable sanctuary."

So far, the objects found at Doliche have been identified as belonging to the late Babylonian, Syrian Achaemenid and Levantine cultures. The seals are made of glass, stone and quartz ceramics, and they feature a wide range of images, from men fighting animals to men praying in front of divine symbols.

"Even those images that do not depict a deity express strong personal piety: With their seals, people consecrated an object to their god which was closely associated with their own identity," archaeologist Michael Blömer, also a professor at the University of Münster, said in a statement.

Winter said the seals and amulets could fill gaps in knowledge about history of worship at the site, especially during the first millennium B.C., before Doliche's status as a Roman sacred site was cemented.

Winter and Blömer conducted excavations this year during a two-month period. The site is being preserved and protected so that it can double as an archaeological park that will be accessible to visitors, the researchers say.

http://www.livescience.com/41374-sta...sanctuary.html
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old November 23rd, 2013 #65
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default 3,700-Year-Old Wine Cellar Discovered in Israel



A 3,700-year-old wine cellar was discovered in Israel in the ruins of a Canaanite palace. Researchers uncovered 40 ceramic jars dating back to approximately 1700 B.C. The team of excavators and analysts included members from Brandeis University, the University of Pennsylvania, The George Washington University, Boston University, and the University of Haifa in Israel.

The ancient jars show evidence of sophisticated wines—red and possibly white wine. Traces of tartaric and syringic acid, key components of wine, were found using a chemical technique called organic residue analysis. These wines were also found to have been blended with other ingredients such as honey, mint, cedar, cinnamon, juniper berries, and tree resin, which was a common preservative. The wine recipe was similar to wines used later by Egyptians, and then across the Mediterranean.

Evidence suggests that the wine was not consumed by the local population, but reserved for royalty, important guests, and palace banquets in ancient Canaan.

Proportions of each compound were analyzed and remarkable consistency was discovered between jars.

“This wasn’t moonshine that someone was brewing in their basement,” says Andrew Koh one of the team members from Brandeis University in the Brandeis University press. “This wine’s recipe was strictly followed in each and every jar.”

This represents the “consistency and control you’d expect in a palace” says Curtis Runnels, an archaeologist at Boston University, according to AP.
This is the oldest palace wine cellar ever discovered according to Brandeis University news. The wine cellar would have been capable of holding about 530 gallons of wine.

“The wine cellar was located near a hall where banquets took place, a place where the Kabri elite and possibly foreign guests consumed goat meat and wine,” said Assaf Yasur-Landau co-director of the excavation from the University of Haifa, according to Brandeis University Press.

Two doors were discovered leading out of the wine cellar, probably to additional storage rooms. The nature and contents of these other two rooms will not be known until 2015.

This discovery sheds new light on the development of winemaking in ancient Canaan. Before this discovery the sophistication of wines was a fact suggested only in ancient texts.

http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/3687...srael/?photo=2

[visit link for more photo slideshow]
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old November 24th, 2013 #66
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default Viking-age 'gold men' unearthed in Sweden



Swedish archaeologists have revealed a secret hoard of ancient trinkets including gold figures and Viking coins, with experts hoping the find will reveal more information about the Iron Age in Sweden.


"The initial find was a real surprise," archaeologist Mikael Henriksson told The Local. "But it sunk in after a while."

The initial find Henriksson refers to is his own discovery of a bronze Celtic mask back in 2004, on a hill in a valley in Västra Vång in Blekinge. After eight years, a whole team was dispatched to the area to conduct a thorough excavation with geo-radars where the team found what Henriksson called a site "of great importance" dating back to the Iron Age, between the birth of Christ and the early Middle Ages.

The team uncovered a number of trinkets there over a period of two years, including gold foil heads of men and women that were likely used to decorate large cauldrons.

Since then, the team kept the finds secret from the public to avoid plundering, and retrieved a total of 29 of the anthropomorphic gold foils (known as guldgubbar in Swedish) - the third biggest find of its kind in Swedish history. The team also found five bronze-cast heads, fragments of a vessel, as well as other bronze objects, Roman glass, gold spirals and Viking-age coins.

As to whether the artefacts were left on purpose or abandoned, Henriksson cannot say, but added that it was turbulent times when the objects were used.

"There were masses of people moving around Europe, it was right after the fall of the west Roman empire and it was every tribe for itself. It affected all of Europe. But what we can say is that the vessels we found were used for ritual drinking and feasting, and were even sacrificial. The area may have been buried or it may have been deserted and left for good. Or it could have been a ritual burial site - we're still not really sure."

But the finds are of great importance, he added, stating that comparing the trove with other similar finds in southern Scandinavia may shed more light on the Iron Age in Sweden.

"This is a unique opportunity to establish a cooperation of a kind that hasn't been possible before," Henriksson told The Local.

The artefacts will be on display in the Blekinge Museum in summer, with images of the finds to be uploaded to the website soon.

IN PICTURES: See more from the find

http://www.thelocal.se/20131115/viki...outhern-sweden
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old November 24th, 2013 #67
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default Swedish woman finds 2,000-year-old gold ring



A woman was left gobsmacked when she learned the gold ring she stumbled across in a field was 2,000 years old.

"I walk through that field several times a week. At first I thought it was one of the little rings we put around the chickens’ feet," Camilla Lundin, 51, told The Local. "I thought it was strange that it was so far away from home."

Lundin took the ring home and showed her husband, who also didn't believe it was anything special. But Lundin took a picture which she sent to her brother, who immediately told her it was a treasure.

"When he told me it was an ancient gold ring, it felt like a gift from the underworld," Lundin told The Local. "It was my magnificent ring. I didn’t want to give it up."

Swedish law states that archaeological finds more than 100 years old belong to the finder. However, if the item is made of alloy such as gold, silver, or bronze, the finder must allow the state to examine and potentially purchase the item.

Lundin reluctantly called the Swedish National Heritage Board (Riksantikvarieämbetet) and gave up the ring for examination. The Board determined that the golden spiral-shaped ring was made in the Roman Iron Age more than 2,000 years ago.

The Board wanted to search the farm where Lundin found the ring, in the tiny town of Gudhem located halfway between Gothenburg and Linköping. Lundin discovered the trinket in June 2011, but due to planting seasons the Board was unable to investigate the field until autumn. The research and paperwork took more than two years, but for Lundin it all paid off. After searching the farm for similar artefacts on two separate occasions, the state offered Lundin 11,000 kronor ($1,672) for the ring.

"I guess I knew right away it was special, but I had no idea just how valuable it was," said Lundin, who confessed she still felt slightly disappointed to lose the ring. "I haven’t decided what to do with the money yet, but it will definitely be something special. Maybe I’ll travel somewhere."

The Roman Iron Age is the period of history in Northern Europe when the Roman Empire’s influence reached the Germanic tribes. During this time many coins, buckles, and other bronze items were imported to Scandinavia.

It's not the first time valuable rings have popped out of Swedish soil - two years ago a woman pulled up a carrot which had grown through her wedding ring, lost six years before.

http://www.thelocal.se/20131122/2000...-found-on-farm
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old November 24th, 2013 #68
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default



Archaeologists digging around Stockholm's Slussen found themselves in a rich family's 16th century kitchen, complete with intricate tobacco pipes and an unexplained heap of eggshells.


A controversial proposal to redevelop Stockholm's Slussen junction was approved in late September, and three weeks later archaeologists began excavating the area around Södermalmstorg.

The rare opportunity to dig in the middle the bustling district of the Swedish captial has archaeologists giddy after unearthing a wealthy family's 16th century kitchen, with curiosities to spare.

"It’s thrilling," project leader Kenneth Svensson told The Local. "We know so little about Södermalm, historically and archaeologically. Everything we find is something new."

At the end of October the team discovered a basement kitchen apparently belonging to a rich family at the end of the 16th century. The walls are still mostly intact, made of plastered brick surrounding a sandstone floor.

"It's an extraordinary feeling to stand there," Svensson said. "It's rare that we find three-dimensional sites with standing walls. You can almost imagine what it was like."

he kitchen also features two large tile stoves, one of which had been walled up in a 17th-century renovation and was inexplicably full of eggshells. Both hen eggs and goose eggs had been placed into the stove, and the team can only guess why.

"It was totally unexpected. We don’t know why they ended up in the oven," Svensson said. "They could have been cooking, but it looks like some kind of ritual. Back in those days there were many different folk rituals when people built houses and tore them down, things like putting coins under the floors to bring luck."

Sure enough, coins were also found beneath the floors, dating back to 1590, the reign of Queen Christina. The house stood there for about 45 years and was torn down in 1635, when Stockholm expanded and created road plans for the island of Södermalm.




Before the new city plan of the 1630s, Södermalm (called Åsön at the time) was on the outskirts of Stockholm and was mostly inhabited by craftsmen and merchants. Svensson suspects that life across the street was another world. The archaeologists have discovered mounds of waste and garbage in much simpler house frames nearby.

"There was a different kind of social strata," Svensson said. "We didn’t expect to find such a wealthy family living here."

Researchers suspect the family was heavily compensated for the land when the house was torn down in redevelopment. They didn't even pack all their trinkets. Coins, perfume bottles, and intricate pipes were found on the site.

"It's spectacular," Svenson said of the most ornate tobacco pipe. The pipe is carved and depicts Jonah of legend being eaten by a crocodile - which then spit him back out due to his foul tobacco flavour.

"At that time it was only wealthy people and the upper middle class that smoked pipes," Svensson said. "They are usually simple and undecorated. So this one was something special."

The team will keep digging at Södermalmstorg for about another two weeks, wrapping up at the site on December 6th. Svensson believes they will reach medieval artefacts before then.

"The most exciting thing would be to find medieval remains here, and I think we will. Right now we’re in the 16th century and we still have a half metre left to dig."

Slussen's redevelopment is expected to go on for about seven years, during which the team of archaeologists will continue digging at various sites before they are reconstructed.

http://www.thelocal.se/20131119/posh...archaeologists
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old November 26th, 2013 #69
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default Archeologists in Nepal say they have unearthed oldest Buddhist shrine

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2013/11...ddhist-shrine/

KATMANDU, Nepal – Archeologists in Nepal say they have discovered traces of a wooden structure dating from the sixth century B.C. that they believe is the world's oldest Buddhist shrine.

Kosh Prasad Acharya, who teamed with archeologists from Britain's Durham University, said Tuesday that the structure was unearthed inside the sacred Mayadevi Temple in Lumbini. Buddha, also known as Siddhartha Gautama, is generally thought to have been born in about the sixth century B.C. at the temple site.

The findings were published in the December issue of the journal Antiquity.

Acharya said the traces were tested using radiocarbon and luminescence techniques, which found they dated from the sixth century B.C.

The archaeological team dug underneath previously known brick structures inside the temple, and experts from Scotland's University of Sterling examined and collected the samples, he said.

The team has been working on the site for the past three years.

Previously, a pillar installed by Indian Emperor Ashok with inscriptions dating to the third century B.C. was considered to be the oldest Buddhist structure, Acharya said.

"This finding further strengthens the chronology of Buddha's life and is major news for the millions of Buddhists around the world," Acharya said in an interview.

"Very little is known about the life of the Buddha, except through textual sources and oral tradition," Durham University archaeologist Robin Coningham said in a statement. "Now, for the first time, we have an archaeological sequence at Lumbini that shows a building there as early as the sixth century B.C."

Each year, tens of thousands of Buddhists visit Lumbini, 280 kilometers (175 miles) southwest of Katmandu.

Followers believe Siddhartha, a prince, left his family and kingdom and meditated in the jungles of Nepal and India before achieving enlightenment.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old November 28th, 2013 #70
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default 10,000-year-old house uncovered outside Jerusalem



A remarkable archaeological find in the Judean lowlands southwest of Jerusalem includes a six-millennia-old cultic temple and a 10,000-year-old house.

he ancient sites were located in routine archaeological digs conducted ahead of a planned expansion of Route 38, the main access road to Beit Shemesh. The building is the oldest ever found in the area, and constitutes remarkable “evidence of man’s transition to permanent dwellings,” researchers said Monday.


A 10,000 year old house, the oldest dwelling to be unearthed to date in the Judean lowlands.

Labeling it “a fascinating glimpse into thousands of years of human development,” the Israel Antiquities Authority, together with the Netivei Israel Company that is carrying out the highway expansion, invited the public to visit the excavation site in Eshtaol on Wednesday, November 27.

“Settlement remains were unearthed at the site, the earliest of which dates to the beginning of the eighth millennium BCE and latest to the end of the fourth millennium BCE,” the authority said in a statement Monday.

“We uncovered a multitude of unique finds during the excavation,” said Amir Golani, one of the excavators for the Antiquities Authority. “The large excavation affords us a broad picture of the progression and development of the society in the settlement throughout the ages. Thus we can clearly see that in the Early Bronze Age, 5,000 years ago, a rural society made the transition to an urban society. We can see distinctly a settlement that gradually became planned, which included [streets] and buildings that were extremely impressive from the standpoint of their size and the manner of their construction. We can clearly trace the urban planning and see the guiding hand of the settlement’s leadership that chose to regulate the construction in the crowded regions in the center of the settlement and allowed less planning along its periphery.”


The standing stone (mazzevā) which is worked on all of its sides, serving as evidence of cultic activity in the Chalcolithic period

The finds allow the researchers to “trace the development of a society which became increasingly hierarchical,” Golani said.

The oldest building found dates from the time of the earliest known domestication of plants and animals.

“Whoever built the house did something that was totally innovative because up until this period [local human groups] migrated from place to place in search of food. Here we have evidence of man’s transition to permanent dwellings, and that in fact is the beginning of the domestication of animals and plants; instead of searching out wild sheep, ancient man started raising them near the house,” researchers said in a statement.

The researchers included Golani, Ya‘akov Vardi, Benyamin Storchan and Ron Be’eri, who serve as excavation directors for the Antiquities Authority.

The house is the oldest structure ever found in the Judean lowlands, they said, dating back to the period known to archaeologists as the Pre-Pottery Neolithic.

“The building, almost all of which was found, underwent a number of construction and repair phases that allude to its importance,” they said.

Near the building, excavators found a collection of nine flint and limestone axes placed side by side.

“It is apparent that the axes, some of which were used as tools and some as cultic objects, were highly valued by their owners. Just as today we are unable to get along without a cellular telephone and a computer, they too attributed great importance to their tools. Based on how it was arranged at the time of its discovery it seems that the cluster of axes was abandoned by its owner for some unknown reason,” the researchers concluded.

But the building wasn’t the only find at the site. A handful of buildings from the end of the Chalcolithic period, some 6,000 years ago, was found nearby. At the site, excavators found a six-sided stone column standing some 1.3 meters (51 inches) high and weighing several hundred kilos.

“The standing stone was smoothed and worked on all six of its sides,” the archaeologists said, explaining that its broad face was oriented eastward and concluding that the find ”alludes to the presence of a cultic temple at the site.”

In the past, numerous manifestations have been found of the cultic practice that existed in the Chalcolithic period. However, from the research, we know of only a few temples” located at Ein Gedi and Teleilat Ghassul in present-day Jordan.

http://www.timesofisrael.com/archaeo...-old-building/
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old December 1st, 2013 #71
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default World's oldest prehistoric toilet unearthed in Argentina



A giant prehistoric ‘toilet’ has been unearthed in Argentina after scientists uncovered thousands of fossilised feces deposited 240-million-years ago.

The dung deposited by rhino-like megaherbivores was clustered together, suggesting for the first time that ancient reptiles shared collective dumping grounds.

The communal latrines are now being described as the world's oldest public toilet.

Many modern animals defaecate in socially agreed spaces for social and biological reasons, such as to mark territory, as a defence against predators and to prevent intestinal parasite re-infestation.

The fossil 'coprolites', which were up to 40cm wide, were discovered in patches across the Chanares Formation in La Rioja province. These dung piles were deposited there by the Dinodontosaurus, an eight-foot-long ancient animal similar to the rhino, common in the Triassic period.

The researchers recorded a density of 94 poos per square metre, spread across patches 900 square metres in size and preserved by a sheet of volcanic ash, lead researcher Dr Lucas Fiorelli told the BBC.

The study, published in Scientific Reports, could provide more information on diet and diseases.

“When cracked open they reveal fragments of extinct plants, fungi, and gut parasites,” Martin Hechenleitner, a fellow author on the study said.

“Each poo is a snapshot of an ancient ecosystem - the vegetation and the food chain."

The authors concluded: "This is the first evidence of megaherbivore communal latrines in non-mammal vertebrates, indicating that this mammal-type behaviour was present in distant relatives of mammals, and predates its previous oldest record by 220 Mya."


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/sc...a-8972483.html
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old December 3rd, 2013 #72
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default First-Ever Hasmonean Building Discovered in Jerusalem

In recent months, the remains of an impressive building from the Hasmonean period – specifically, the second century BCE – are being unearthed in excavations in Jerusalem. The dig is being carried out by the Israel Antiquities Authority in the Givati parking lot, located in the City of David, in the Walls Around Jerusalem National Park.

The building stands about 4 meters high and covers an area of about 64 square meters. The building’s broad walls, more than one meter thick, are made of roughly hewn limestone blocks that were arranged as headers and stretchers, a construction method characteristic of the Hasmonean period.

Although numerous pottery vessels were discovered inside the building, it was mainly the coins that surprised the researchers. These indicated the structure was erected in the early second century BCE and continued into the Hasmonean period, during which time significant changes were made inside it.

According to Dr. Doron Ben Ami and Yana Tchekhanovets, the excavation directors on behalf to the Israel Antiquities Authority, "The importance of this discovery is primarily because of the conspicuous paucity of buildings from the Hasmonean city of Jerusalem in archaeological research, despite the many excavations that have been conducted to date.

"Apart from several remains of the city’s fortifications that were discovered in different parts of Jerusalem, as well as pottery and other small finds, none of the Hasmonean city’s buildings have been uncovered so far, and this discovery bridges a certain gap in Jerusalem’s settlement sequence. The Hasmonean city, which is well-known to us from the historical descriptions that appear in the works of Josephus, has suddenly acquired tangible expression".

The excavations are sponsored by the "Friends of City of David."

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/Ne...4#.Up234idfXkI
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old December 3rd, 2013 #73
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default Giant World War II aircraft-carrying submarine discovered off Oahu coast

A World War II-era Imperial Japanese Navy mega-submarine, the I-400, lost since 1946 when it was intentionally scuttled by U.S. forces after its capture, has been discovered in more than 2,300 feet of water off the southwest coast of O‘ahu. The discovery resolves a decades-old Cold War mystery of just where the lost submarine lay, and recalls a different era as one war ended and a new, undeclared conflict emerged.

Longer than a football field at 400 feet, the I-400 was known as a “Sen-Toku” class submarine—the largest submarine ever built until the introduction of nuclear-powered subs in the 1960s. With a range of 37,500 miles, the I-400 and its sister ship, the I-401, were able to travel one and a half times around the world without refueling, a capability that, to this day, has never been matched by any other diesel-electric submarine.

The new discovery of the I-400 was led by veteran undersea explorer Terry Kerby, Hawaiʻi Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL) operations director and chief submarine pilot. Since 1992, HURL has used its manned submersibles Pisces IV and Pisces V to hunt for submarines and other submerged cultural resources as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) maritime heritage research effort.

Heritage properties like historic wreck sites are non-renewable resources possessing unique information about the past. This discovery was part of a series of dives funded by a grant from NOAA’s Office of Exploration and Research and the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST). Working with Steven Price of HURL, Kerby has researched the subject of lost submarines off O‘ahu for decades. On these recent dives, Kerby was joined by two NOAA archaeologists with experience in documenting World War II vessels and submarines, Drs. James Delgado and Hans Van Tilburg.

“The I-400 has been on our ‘to-find’ list for some time. It was the first of its kind of only three built, so it is a unique and very historic submarine,” said Kerby. “Finding it where we did was totally unexpected. All our research pointed to it being further out to sea. The multi-beam anomalies that appear on a bottom survey chart can be anything from wrecks to rocks—you don’t know until you go there. Jim and Hans and I knew we were approaching what looked like a large wreck on our sonar. It was a thrill when the view of a giant submarine appeared out of the darkness.”



The I-400 and the I-401 aircraft-carrying submarines held up to three folding-wing float-plane bombers that could be launched by catapult just minutes after the submarines surfaced. Each aircraft could carry a powerful 1,800-pound bomb to attack the U.S. mainland. But neither was ever used for its designed purpose, their missions curtailed by the end of armed conflict in the Pacific.

“The innovation of air strike capability from long-range submarines represented a tactical change in submarine doctrine,” said Delgado, director of NOAA’s Maritime Heritage Program, within the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Washington, D.C. “The large I-400, with its extended range and ability to launch three M6A1 Seiran strike aircraft, was clearly an important step in the evolution of submarine design.”

Up until the Sen-Toku’s day, submarines had been almost exclusively dedicated to sinking surface ships (and other submarines) by stealth attack from under water.



“The I-400 is technologically significant due to the design features associated with its large watertight hangar,” Delgado said. “Following World War II, submarine experimentation and design changes would continue in this direction, eventually leading to ballistic missile launching capabilities for U.S. submarines at the advent of the nuclear era.”

At the end of WWII, the U.S. Navy captured five Japanese subs, including the I-400, and brought them to Pearl Harbor for inspection. When the Soviet Union demanded access to the submarines in 1946 under the terms of the treaty that ended the war, the U.S. Navy sank the subs off the coast of Oʻahu and claimed to have no information on their precise location. The goal was to keep their advanced technology out of Soviet hands during the opening chapters of the Cold War. HURL has now successfully located four of these five lost submarines.

The HURL crew identified the wreck site by carefully combing through side-scan sonar and multi-beam sonar data to identify anomalies on a deep sea floor littered with rocky outcrops and other debris. The wreck was positively identified as the I-400 based on features including its aircraft launch ramp, deck crane, torpedo tube configuration, and stern running lights. The remains of the submarine’s aircraft hangar and conning tower appear to have been separated from the wreck, perhaps in the blunt trauma of the three U.S. Navy torpedo blasts that sunk the ship in 1946.

The I-400 was discovered in August 2013 and is being announced today after NOAA has reviewed its findings with the U.S. state department and Japanese government officials.

“These historic properties in the Hawaiian Islands recall the critical events and sacrifices of World War II in the Pacific, a period which greatly affected both Japan and the United States and shaped the Pacific region as we now know it,” said Van Tilburg, maritime heritage coordinator for NOAA in the Pacific Islands region. “Our ability to interpret these unique weapons of the past and jointly understand our shared history is a mark of our progress from animosity to reconciliation. That is the most important lesson that the site of the I-400 can provide today.”

Video from I-400 initial sighting:

Video from HURL submarine operations: https://www.youtube.com/user/HURLSubOps/videos

http://www.hawaii.edu/news/article.php?aId=6166
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old December 3rd, 2013 #74
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default Remains of prehistoric funerary banquets discovered in Israel

Jerusalem, Dec 3 (IANS) An excavation by Israeli archaeologists unearthed remains of a lavish meal held near a tomb by prehistoric men to mourn their dead, making the find the oldest funerary meal discovered.

The ongoing excavation at the Carmel Mountains near Haifa in north Israel is examining the caves dotting the mountains that were used by a prehistoric tribe 13,000 years ago, Xinhua reported.

“We know that prehistoric men buried their dead and mourned them, but we didn’t know they also held ritualistic meals near their graves,” Guy Bar-Oz from Haifa University’s Zinman Institute of Archaeology said.

“We know they are leftovers of a big meal because the remains are not complete bones, many of them were broken and bone marrow had been extracted from some of them, which lead us to believe they were not remains of complete animals,” Bar-Oz said.


Archaeologists have been digging in the caves since 2003 and have so far excavated 29 skeletons that belong to the Natufian people that dwelled in the Levant region between 12,000 and 15,000 years ago. The leading archaeologists, Reuven Yeshurun, Bar-Oz and Dani Nadel are from Haifa University and have worked for a decade on the project alongside researchers from the Weizmann Institute in Israel and colleagues from France, Hungary and the US.

Their study was published in December’s edition of the Journal of Anthropological Archaeology. “Our thesis regarding this find that we unearthed in only one grave so far is that all the tribe would sit together near the tomb because it can accommodate a lot of people and has a great view of the mountains,” Bar-Oz said.

The Haifa Natufians roamed Israel at the end of the ice age and ended the nomadic life to settle down. According to researchers, they were also animists, which means that they attributed mystical powers to nature.


To better support their theory regarding the funerary ritual banquet, the team of researchers point out to the marks left on the animal bones found near the grave. Looking over broken bones with marks on them, Bar-Oz says the Natufians “used flint tools to cut the bones and the meat and when they were doing funerary offers to accompany the dead person on their last trip.

They would bury the animals intact.” Their preferred meals were mainly gazelle meat, but they would also eat other animals in their surroundings, such as turtles and hares. “We found the bones of young male gazelles, hares, turtles and other small mammals near the grave, and we know that prehistoric men eat these kinds of meat, because they were easy to hunt and they could be found in large numbers near the mountains,” the researcher said. The excavation at the Carmel Mountains will continue as part of a bigger project on the Natufians.


One of the biggest discoveries made in the caves was a large graveyard that contained the remains of different generations spanning more than 1,000 years.

Read more at: http://www.firstpost.com/fwire/remai...ce=ref_article
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old December 3rd, 2013 #75
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default East Asia's first Neolithic quartz axe discovered in S. Korea



SEOUL, Dec. 3 (Yonhap) -- A private archaeological company said Tuesday its researchers have discovered a Neolithic polished axe made of quartz for the first time in East Asia.

The hand axe was found during an archaeological survey of a site near an atomic power plant that is under construction in the southeastern South Korean city of Ulsan, according to the company. The axe is presumed to date back to the early Neolithic age, which is about 6,000 B.C.

"As far as a polished stone tool made of quartz from the Neolithic Era ar concerned, it is the first of its kind ever unearthed in any East Asian country such as South Korea, Japan and China," the Bukyung Cultural Relics Research Institute said in a press release.

Chances are high that the newly discovered axe was a decoration or ritual item, as it is far smaller than other polished stone tools that were actually used as utensils, it said.

In addition to the ax, other items were found at the site, such as pottery, spears and other types of stone axes and stone scrapers, it said.

http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/cult...05900315F.html
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old December 3rd, 2013 #76
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default Tomb of Kenesary Khan's warriors discovered in Astana



An ancient tomb of Kenesary Khan's warriors has been discovered in Astana, Express K reports.

The unique discovery was made at a old Muslim cemetery located near Molodezhny microdistrict of Astana city. According to Director of the Modern Research Institute of Astana-based Gumilev Eurasian National University Mukhit-Ardager Sydyknazarov, the team of researchers discovered the tombstone with lettering in Arabic ligature at the cemetery.

"The tombstone has partially sank into the ground during two centuries, and this prevents us from reading all the lettering on the stone yet. As far as I know, there is no other tombstones consecrated to the warrior-host of Kenesary khan in Kazakhstan," Sydyknazarov said.

An unofficial translation of the lettering has been made: it says that the tombstone was erected by some Samyrza at the expenses of Kaiyrolly Sarzhan Uly in 1838, in the month of Rajab, the seventh month of the Muslim year, during the holy three-day fast. 50 zhasulans (warriors who were carrying out commissions of commanders) and 200 notable commanders, killed during the war, rest in the grave.

According to Express K, the lettering corresponds with the recorded historic facts. Kenesary's army was stationed in Akmola region in the middle of 1838. It is quite possible, that the remains of the warriors, who died in this period, are inddeed lying in the grave.

Kenesary Kasymov was proclaimed Khan of the Kazakhs when the Russian Empire was already fully in control of Kazakhstan, and in fact the Kazakhs were prohibited (by Russian law) from selecting their own leaders after 1822. Kenesary spend his time as Khan in continuous fighting against Russian imperial forces and other intruders until his death in 1847. Widely regarded as a freedom fighter and popular as a leading voice against the increasingly aggressive and forceful policies of the Russian Empire, Kenesary was ruthless in his actions and unpredictable as a military strategist.

http://en.tengrinews.kz/science/Tomb...-Astana-24312/
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old December 3rd, 2013 #77
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default Slave relics and other artifacts discovered on site of future Georgia highway project

SAVANNAH, Ga. — The site of a $30 million highway project in Savannah has turned up thousands of artifacts from what archaeologists believe were once slave quarters on the property.

A team of archaeologists spent three months surveying the 20-acre tract on Savannah’s suburban south side, where the state Department of Transportation plans next year to build an elevated section of highway over a busy residential crossing.

Archaeologist Rita Elliott says the team found more than 33,000 artifacts including an 1831 Mexican coin, nails from long-decayed wooden dwellings, and broken plates and bottles. Bullets, buttons and other evidence of a Union campsite from the Civil War also were found.

Elliott says records show the land was part of a plantation owned by a Savannah attorney named William Miller, who owned 87 slaves

http://www.postandcourier.com/articl...y-project-site
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old December 3rd, 2013 #78
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default 10,000-year-old settlement unearthed in Cork



That’s according to archaeologists who will reveal a wealth of information about our ancestors when they launch a book published by the National Roads Authority on Dec 10 at UCC.

It details illustrated accounts of the 114 significant excavations undertaken in the county, revealing a wealth of previously unrecorded sites, each adding to our understanding of the story of Cork — going back to the county’s first known settlers, more than 500 generations ago.

While the 8,100BC settlement in Fermoy, uncovered during the construction of the M8, is deemed to be the oldest, evidence of similarly ancient hunter-gatherers was discovered near Ballincollig and Youghal.



NRA project archaeologist Ken Hanley, who edited the book, said a lakeside wooden hunting platform and an antler from a giant elk, which had been fashioned into a tool by humans, were found at the oldest known site at Corrin, Fermoy.

He said there was evidence that, around that time, part of a large forest in the area was burned down to make way for a settlement.

Houses built by Cork’s first farmers (c.3,900BC) were found near Ballincollig and Fermoy, while a substantial Bronze Age settlement was found near Rathcormac.

The most exceptional discovery was the Mitchelstown Face Cup, dating to the Bronze Age.

“This is the oldest known three-dimensional representation of a person ever discovered in Ireland,” said Mr Haney. “It was radio carbon-dated to 1,800BC. It is unique. It came as a complete surprise. It was a spectacular find.”

A sauna dating to 1,400BC was uncovered at Scartbarry, near Watergrasshill.

“Two substantial early medieval settlements were discovered at Curraheen, near Bishopstown and at Ballynacarriga on Youghal bypass. Both date to the seventh century AD,” said Mr Hanley.

An Anglo-Norman moated settlement, built in the 13th century, was unearthed at Ballinvinny South, north-east of Glanmire.

The same settlement was later occupied in the 17th century and held a horde of James II coins.

“These weren’t ordinary coins,” said Mr Hanely. “[James] had no money. Instead of using gold and silver coins he smelted coins from cheaper metals to pay his soldiers.”

The tokens were to be redeemed for real money if he won the war against William of Orange, but he didn’t and so they were worthless.

All the finds were made courtesy of NRA funding in five road projects: Glanmire-Watergrasshill bypass (N8); Rathcormac-Fermoy motorway (M8); Mitchelstown Relief Roads (N8/N73); Ballincollig bypass (N22); and Youghal bypass (N25).

The NRA has funded more than 2,000 excavations on national road projects since it was established in 1994.

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland...rk-251299.html
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old December 3rd, 2013 #79
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default



An unassuming silver coin found in Israel’s coastal city of Acre has tremendous historical value, both for the Crusader town and for a lost central European empire now relegated to rhapsodies and broke artists.

It had little intrinsic worth when it was minted in the mid-13th century, the dusk of the crusades in the Holy Land, yet the St. Chrisopher penny unearthed in a 2009 excavation in Acre is today the oldest known coin to refer to the king of Bohemia. Its discovery offers a unique insight into the dying days of the Crusader kingdoms.

The silver coin, a denier little bigger than a modern one-shekel piece, was found amid a hoard of marble slabs during excavations headed by Dr. Edna Stern of the Israel Antiquities Authority in the coastal city in 2009. The trove was stashed just before the city, the last toehold of the Crusader kingdoms, was put to the sword by the Mamelukes in 1291.

“On the face of it, we didn’t attach much importance to it,” Dr. Robert Kool, a medieval numismatist with the Israel Antiquities Authority said, “until we started trying to identify the coin and didn’t succeed.”

On the front of the coin appears a regal figure with a pointed crown and a scepter topped by a lily; along the edge reads a partially illegible inscription, “ZL REX BOEMO” — king of the Bohemians, a title bestowed upon monarchs for the better part of a millennium. Which king, precisely, remains uncertain. On the back is a bearded figure identified as St. Christopher. Kool said the silver penny didn’t match any local coin types, nor any of the usual suspects from France, England or Germany.

What followed was what Kool called a “scientific detective story” to decipher the provenance of the coin and the identity of the king. The IAA contacted experts at Oxford University, who referred the case to Dr. Borys Paszkiewicz, an expert in Eastern European coinages at the University of Wroclaw in Poland. The overarching question, Kool said, was what a Bohemian coin was doing in medieval Acre



Modern day Acre — Akko in Hebrew, Akka in Arabic — is best known as a hotbed for religious tensions, crime and top shelf hummus. But in the High Middle Ages it was the capital of the rump Kingdom of Jerusalem and major entrepôt on the Levantine coast.

After Saladin’s capture of Jerusalem in 1187, the fortified port of Acre served as headquarters for the exiled crusader monarchy and the chivalric orders of legend, particularly the Knights Hospitaller, the Teutonic Knights and the Templars. In the century before its fall to the Mameluke armies, Acre was a hub for commerce between Europe and the lands of Islam and beyond.

In the 13th century it was home to a kaleidoscope of communities living cheek-by-jowl within the cramped city walls. Venetian, Pisan and Genoese traders carved out quarters of their own alongside French, English and German knights and merchants; a small population of Muslims, mostly traders, made the walled city their home. With the flood of incoming Occidentals, Acre expanded northwards and constructed the neighborhood of Montmusard, where the coin was found.

Kool explained that the coin supports other fragments of historical evidence of Bohemian pilgrimage and migration to the Holy Land, mirroring the trend in Western Europe, as early as the late 12th century. The bulk of the Bohemian migration to the Frankish East, however, occurred in the 1200s. Farther down the coast in Caesarea, archaeologists found a hoard containing five Bohemian coins similar to the silver denier found in Acre dating to the mid-1200s that bore no mention of rex boemo.

“We have here the earliest example of a coin naming the king of Bohemia,” Kool said, excitement audible in his voice, “which in itself was already a discovery.” Until the penny surfaced, the earliest known coin in existence mentioning the king of Bohemia was dated well after 1300, at least half a century later. The fact that St. Christopher, instead of national hero St. Wenceslaus, was on the coin’s reverse, made it additionally unique.

“The veneration of saints in the European Middle Ages was an important part of culture and politics,” Eastern European coin expert Paszkiewicz wrote by email. He explained that the Bohemians traditionally put Wenceslaus on their coins, and that ”the coin reverse was simply a completely new and surprising piece of historical evidence.”
Statue of King Ottokar II of Bohemia in Prague. (photo credit: Acoma, Wikimedia Commons)



Statue of King Ottokar II of Bohemia in Prague. (photo credit: Acoma, Wikimedia Commons)


Which king graces the coin remains uncertain, but Kool and Paszkiewicz have it narrowed down to King Premizl Ottokar II, described by a contemporary as “a lion in his bravery and an eagle in his kindness,” who ruled from 1253-1278. (For Tintin buffs out there, Ottokar II of Bohemia should not be confused for the fictional Syldavian leader of the same name.)

Ottokar II led a rebellion against his father King Wenceslaus I in 1248 and claimed the crown. A year later he was defeated by his father. After Wenceslaus’s death in 1253, Ottokar reigned as “lord of Bohemia” before being formally crowned king in 1261.

Paszkiewicz, Kool and Stern suggest in their soon-to-be published paper about the coin that the St. Christopher penny was minted either in 1248, when Ottokar II attempted to usurp the throne, or in 1262, just after he was at last crowned king of Bohemia.

“Both the unusual title and the unusual patron seem to speak for the earlier event,” they wrote.

Ottokar II’s kingdom stretched from the Sudeten mountains to the Adriatic, and Kool suggested that the penny “also expresses his ambitions to become an important territorial ruler” in a changing Europe.

What the bard who eulogized him failed to mention was that the king was rich as Croesus. Kool pointed out that virtually no coins from Eastern Europe have been found in the Holy Land from the period of the Crusades, except for the St. Christopher penny and the small batch of Bohemian coins found at Caesarea.

“During this period large silver mines were discovered, and Bohemia became a very important producer of silver ore,” Kool said. He explained that silver was the standard currency in medieval Europe: “There was no gold in Europe. The European economy didn’t use gold [coinage] for almost 500 years, unlike the economies in the Muslim East.”

He said he could imagine how the coin — if it wasn’t brought by a Crusader — may have followed the medieval trade routes from Prague through Austria to Venice — “the most important merchant city in the world then” — and across the Mediterranean to Palestine.

“There was an enormous demand for silver in the East, not just for the Crusaders but more among the Muslim rulers,” Kool said.

Paszkiewicz mentioned another theory proffered by Dr. Roman Zaoral, an eminent Czech numismatist, who suggested that the coin was issued especially for pilgrims heading to Palestine to join Louis IX of France’s crusade because of the coin’s exceptional use of St. Christopher — the patron saint of travelers and pilgrims. While he is not wholly convinced by that explanation, he posited that it may have been kept by a Bohemian pilgrim “who recognized Christopher as a holy helper when traveling.”

“Why the only known piece of this coin was found in the Holy Land, the destination of Czech crusaders and pilgrims, remains a mystery,” Paszkiewicz said.

http://www.timesofisrael.com/oldest-...found-in-acre/
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old December 5th, 2013 #80
Jae Manzel
...
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default 4,500-year-old city discovered in China

Beijing: Chinese archaeologists yesterday excavated a 4,500-year-old city Neolithic Chinese city in eastern Anhui Province.

Part of a trapezoidal city wall, and a moat from the Nanchengzi ruins in Guzhen County have been uncovered, along with several houses, according to archaeologists from Wuhan University.

The archaeology team has also unearthed items from the Neolithic Age to the Han Dynasty, which dates back about 2,000 years.

The items include deer heads and antlers, tortoise shells and wheat and rice seeds, state-run Xinhua news agency reported.

"The discovery is very valuable for research on historical, social and environmental changes in the area," said He Xiaolin, professor and archaeologist from Wuhan University.

The Nanchengzi Ruins were first found in the 1980s when archaeological authorities believed the site was an ancient settlement.

They only identified the ruins as part of a larger city after they discovered the city wall.

http://www.ndtv.com/article/world/4-...n-china-454598
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Reply

Share


Thread
Display Modes


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:13 PM.
Page generated in 0.20053 seconds.