Vanguard News Network
VNN Media
VNN Digital Library
VNN Reader Mail
VNN Broadcasts

Old March 14th, 2010 #101
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,373
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

Ban sought on importing giant invasive snakes



The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wants to keep giant invasive snakes from being imported into the United States and also make it illegal to transport them across state lines.

As part of that process, it's asking for public comment on its plan.

The Service originally published a proposed rule in the Federal Register to designate the Burmese python and eight other large constrictor snakes "injurious wildlife" under the Lacey Act in 2008. The public comment period begins Friday, March 12 and will continue for 60 says, says Fish and Wildlife spokesman Ken Warren. You can go here to comment. A risk assessment is available here.

Burmese pythons (also known as Indian pythons) are already established across thousands of square miles in south Florida. There's also a population of boa constrictors established south of Miami, Warren says. There's even good evidence of a population of northern African pythons reproducing on the western edges of Miami.

Other snakes that would be covered under the proposed rule are the reticulated python, southern African python, yellow anaconda, DeSchauensee's anaconda, green anaconda, and Beni anaconda.

None are native to the United States.

An assessment by the U.S. Geological Survey found all the species posed a high or medium risk to the health of our ecosystems.

Burmese pythons and other large constrictor snakes are very adaptable to new environments and prey on a wide variety and size of animals. That's especially worrisome to already endangered species. For example, two Burmese pythons found near Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Florida had remains of three endangered Key Largo woodrats in their stomachs.

Since 2000, more than 1,300 Burmese pythons have been removed from Everglades National Park and vicinity.

By Elizabeth Weise

http://content.usatoday.com/communit...sive-snakes-/1

Last edited by Alex Linder; March 14th, 2010 at 01:56 AM.
 
Old March 14th, 2010 #102
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,373
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

Here's a guy doing the sort of careful caretaking that Germanic folk are always found doing, by contrast with jews, who have always hated animals because they haven't yet found a way to sue them for anti-semitism.

Nothing rattles snake expert
Volunteer is helping museum re-tag reptile collection

By Joe Tash, SPECIAL TO THE UNION-TRIBUNE
Saturday, March 13, 2010



SAN DIEGO — Dick Schwenkmeyer was a teenager in the 1940s when he and a buddy caught a 5-foot-long, red diamond rattlesnake in a Del Cerro canyon and carried the reptile in their hands as they walked home past what was then called San Diego State College.

“We walked right through the middle of campus just to create a sensation,” Schwenkmeyer said. The large rattler was later put on exhibit at the San Diego Zoo.

Schwenkmeyer’s boyhood explorations through San Diego’s canyons sparked a lifelong fascination with snakes and other reptiles and San Diego County’s habitat. It also led to a career as a biology teacher and a 66-year association with the San Diego Natural History Museum that continues today.

“I don’t know of anybody else like Dick Schwenkmeyer,” said Bradford Hollingsworth, curator of herpetology at the Natural History Museum. “He’s a walking history book.”

When he’s not out hiking in the canyons around his Tierrasanta home, Schwenkmeyer, 81, can often be found in a windowless basement laboratory at the museum where he is volunteering on a three-year project to put new tags on the institution’s collection of 75,000 preserved reptile and amphibian specimens. Schwenkmeyer himself caught about 450 of the creatures.

“We have the largest rattlesnake collection in the world,” which includes 9,800 specimens, said Schwenkmeyer, as he showed visitors the banks of movable shelves holding row upon row of clear jars with white lids. The jars contain snakes, lizards, frogs, toads, salamanders, crocodiles and other species. The collection dates to 1891.

As a boy, Schwenkmeyer landed a job at the zoo sweeping up the sidewalks in Bear Canyon before moving to the zoo’s reptile house. That job led to an association with Laurence Klauber, chief executive of San Diego Gas & Electric Co., who also collected and studied rattlesnakes and was considered the world’s foremost authority on the subject.

Through Klauber, Schwenkmeyer began participating in programs at the Natural History Museum, and after serving in Korea and Japan during the Korean War, Schwenkmeyer returned to San Diego and studied zoology in college.

“My mother convinced me I’d never make a living as a snake man, so I changed my major and went into education,” Schwenkmeyer said.

He taught biology in San Diego junior and senior high schools, and later worked for 22 years as a biology professor at San Diego Mesa College. During his teaching career, he also led field expeditions and camping trips throughout San Diego County and Baja California as a part-time employee of the museum.

Since his retirement from teaching, Schwenkmeyer has continued his work at the museum on a volunteer basis.

The re-tagging project involves taking the specimens from their jars, in which they are preserved in an ethanol solution, and tying new numbered tags on their legs that link back to information in the museum’s computerized database.

On a recent morning, Schwenkmeyer worked with geckos about 2 inches long, native to desert areas in San Diego County. The painstaking process involved securing the tags with string to the lizards’ rear legs.

“We call it Zen-like, you get in a rhythm,” said Laura Williams, a collections technician at the museum.

The work is carried out by eight to 10 volunteers, and will help keep the collection organized for researchers who study the specimens.

Keeping Schwenkmeyer and Williams company was a live rattlesnake named Chaos, which hissed and shook its rattle furiously when visitors approached its enclosure.

From April through June, he said, the four species of rattlesnake found in San Diego County — red diamond, southern Pacific, speckled and sidewinder — become much more active, posing a potential danger to hikers.

The best way for hikers to avoid a snake bite, he said, is to keep an eye on the trail and stay at last three feet away from rattlers. “When you’re on the trail, keep your eyes on the trail. If you want to look at the scenery, stop walking and then look.”

Schwenkmeyer said he’s never been bitten by a rattlesnake, but has been nipped by king and gopher snakes. As a teenager working at the zoo, he was bitten on the hand by a 9-foot boa constrictor and had to pry the snake’s jaws open with a screwdriver.

At home, Schwenkmeyer keeps two rosy boa constrictors — one of which he has owned for 47 years — and a desert tortoise as pets. “I like them better than cats and dogs. They’re absolutely no trouble,” he said.

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2...-snake-expert/
 
Old March 14th, 2010 #103
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,373
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

Snakes are dying in Florida - and no one seems to care

By Bryan Brasher on March 13, 2010 3:09 PM Share: submit to reddit Share on

A special hunting season for wild pythons began Monday in South Florida and will continue through April 17.

So for the next few weeks, anyone with a Florida hunting license and a $26 snake-hunting permit can kill Burmese pythons, rock pythons, green anacondas and several other species of slithery non-native repitles that have gotten out of in control in the Sunshine State.

The whole situation is utterly bizarre.

What I find strangest about it, though, is that the animal rights advocates - the people who are normally so vocal about issues like this - have said barely a word throughout the entire ordeal.

Every time you hear mention of a special urban hunt to lower whitetail deer populations, the animal rights people come out of the woodworks. A few years back, the save-the-animals brigade even said it was inhumane to use poison on fire ant mounds in my backyard.

So why aren't they shouting from the roof tops about this Florida snake massacre?

Where's the love for the creepy-crawly critters that can swallow a house cat or squeeze a black lab to death?

http://blogs.commercialappeal.com/ou...verglades.html
 
Old March 14th, 2010 #104
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,373
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

[From Ooztrahlya]

'Tis the season for creepy crawlies
ELLEN LUTTON
March 14, 2010 - 2:11PM



Are the mozzies so bad you’re vacuuming the walls before you go to bed? Or have you spotted a python or two in your ceiling of late?

The weather in southeast Queensland recently may have topped up our dams – but it’s also filled our gardens and houses with the dreaded creepy crawlies.

Mosquito controllers have been out in full force trying to tackle the latest tidal wave of buzzing, while six Queenslanders were taken to hospital last week suffering snake bites.

Among those treated was a 15-month-old Bundaberg boy who was bitten on the stomach and a 26-year-old man taken to Ipswich Hospital with a suspected brown snake bite.

Snake catcher Simon Grainger, who is called out to houses within the Brisbane City Council and Redlands areas, says the past couple of weeks have been very busy.

He said he had been called out to Brisbane’s bayside suburbs in particular, where people were mainly finding pythons and tree snakes in their yards or houses – but he had seen other more dangerous species as well.

"I’ve been out to Redland Bay, Capalaba, Cleveland … I’ve had a few black snakes and just the other day a red bellied black snake," he said.

"You could say it’s a mixture of the heat and rain that brings the snakes out.

"It’s coming into the months where they will be slowing down, so in the current weather they’re out looking for food."

Mr Grainger said it was a food chain reaction that started with the smallest of the creepy crawlies.

"What’s happened is that the rain has brought out food for the snakes," he said.

"The ants and the spiders come out in this weather, then the lizards and frogs come out to eat them, then the snakes come out to eat the frogs … it’s just the normal food chain and it’s been amplified by the weather we’ve had.

"Despite the increase in visibility of snakes, I need to remind people that killing them is illegal – they are a protected species – and if you spot one, keep an eye on it and call a wildlife rescue centre."

Brisbane City Council entomologist Mike Muller said he had received a phone call from a Wynnum resident who had never seen the mosquitoes so bad in the 20 years she had lived there.

"She said her family were vacuuming the ceilings and the walls before they went to bed because they were covered in mozzies," Mr Muller said.

"It’s times like this that I realise how effective our spraying is, because just think of how bad things would be living in southeast Queensland if we didn’t treat this problem regularly."

Mr Muller said getting helicopters up into the air to spray was made difficult with the recent near-cyclonic conditions.

"The helicopters were grounded for a few days and instead of getting the job done in one day, it was spread over four days which means a lot of the (mosquito) larvae…it would have been too late."

Once the larvae had hatched, the mosquitos were willing to travel halfway across Brisbane to find their perfect feed, Mr Muller said.

"We’ve seen saltmarsh mosquitos spread from Boondall Wetlands all the way to Chermside, Ascot and Hamilton.

"We’ve fielded calls from Carindale and Norman Park with mosquito problems that have started out at Wynnum," he said.

Mr Muller said the tiniest pockets of water around people’s homes was always the hardest to control.

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/life...0314-q5rj.html
 
Old March 23rd, 2010 #105
Bernie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,302
Bernie
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
[From Ooztrahlya]



That snake you see is a Six foot 'Red Belly Black' Snake which are very venomous but by no means the most venomous of Australia's reptiles. I've seen a monster Red Belly on a Forestry Trail which may have been more than 10 Feet long. On the "Indian Cobra" scale, a Red Belly is about 2X Cobras. We've got some snakes here that are worth 50X Cobra's.

As if their poison wasn't enough, there are more problems with Aussie snakes:

They are SILENT and NOCTURNAL. This means unlike your Rattlesnakes, our bastards don't give you any warning, so if you're gonna get bitten, it will likely be at night. A careless woman went out barefoot at night to get her washing off the line in Suburbia and steps on a Death Adder. These are a horrible beast, so named because until the 1940's when an antidote was discovered, more than HALF of all victims who were bitten died within hours. The woman was bitten a dozen times. Poor thing must have been jumping up and down on the beast, she was dead in a few hours hours.

A few years ago two blokes were camping out bush. At night one of them, named Bluey, went into the scrub to do his 'business' while his mate was tending the camp fire. Suddenly his mate hears a loud scream' 'what's up mate, are you orright? he yells. 'No mate,' came the reply, 'I was squatting down having a 'pony and trap' when, bugger me, a large brown snake bit me by fastening itself on me 'old fella'.

His mate asks, 'Strewth Blue, what do you want me to do? He says, "Mate could you get on the bloody wireless and call the flying doctor and ask them bastards what treatment they reckon is best"

He radios the Flying Doctor who tell him the best treatment is to 'Suck the poison out'. Startled at the unthinkable prospect of sucking blue's old fella, he gently asks the Nurse what would he happen if he didn't do it.

'You mate will be dead inside five minutes' says the Nurse.

He put down the transceiver and thinks for a moment. Meanwhile Bluey, anxious to hear what the flying Doctor service had to say asks, 'What did they say mate, what's gonna happen to me?

'His old mate says quietly, 'She said you've got five minutes to live'.
 
Old June 18th, 2011 #106
Mike Parker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,311
Mike Parker
Default

Woman killed by African black mamba she kept in her New York home along with 75 others

By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated on 17th June 2011

A black mamba, one of the world's most poisonous snakes, is suspected in the death of a woman who kept 75 of the creatures in pens her New York home.

Aleta Stacey, 56, was found dead surrounded by snakes in her house in Putnam Lake, New York, by her boyfriend.

Police were called to the home on Tuesday, about 65 miles from New York City, and discovered approximately 75 snakes in glass aquariums and acrylic snake pens.


Deadly: The black mamba (example pictured) is one of the deadliest snakes in the world

THE WORLD'S DEADLIEST SNAKE

Black mambas are fast, nervous, lethally venomous, and when threatened, highly aggressive.

Black mambas live in the savannas and rocky hills of southern and eastern Africa.

Reaching up to 14 feet they are Africa’s longest venomous snake.

Slithering at speeds of up to 12.5 miles per hour, they are also one of the fastest snakes in the world.

They get their name from the blue-black color of the inside of their mouth, which they display when threatened.

Stacey's boyfriend, Vito Caputo, 46, told investigators that he discovered locks open on an enclosure that housed a five-foot long African black mamba, indicating Stacey was handling the snake and it may have bitten her.

"Possible snake bit wounds on one of her forearms" were found on Stacey's body, according to a statement by the sheriff's office.

Authorities did not rule out foul play in Stacey's demise.

They were awaiting the autopsy results to determine the cause of death

The black mamba is considered the world's most deadly snake, according to the National Geographic Society.

Its bite kills nearly 100 percent of victims unless they are immediately treated with an antivenin.

Untreated, victims typically die within 20 minutes.

The black mamba and the rest of the snakes - some of them venomous - were turned over to the Bronx Zoo, at the direction of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worl...#ixzz1PdCozT56
 
Old February 25th, 2012 #107
Big_Tony
Junior Member
 
Big_Tony's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 5
Big_Tony
Default I have heard of cobras in the Florida Keys since the 70's

Hi,

Gee, this is my first post. I just want to say how nice it is where a man can still talk his mind.

I have heard of cobra's being keep in the Keys as guards to ward off intruders from people who were into contraband. I am certain that this is true.

We don't need mixing up of species of snakes here in the USA. Look at the birds. You don't see red birds with black birds or bluejays with white birds. Espeicially this is offensive to God when humans degrade themselves and mix with like blacks and whites.

Keep your eyes open God is ready to pull the plug,
Big Tony
 
Old August 13th, 2012 #108
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,373
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

Giant Burmese python discovered in Florida (+video)

A newly found Burmese python has broken previous records in size and egg capacity. The discovery is an indication of just how comfortable the invasive species is in its Florida home.

By Megan Gannon, LiveScience / August 13, 2012



A double record-setting Burmese python has been found in the Florida Everglades.

Herpetologist Shawn Heflick and Kimberly Wright discuss how a thriving python population in Everglades National Park has made the refuge more a killing ground than a haven for the endangered mammals, trees, plants, birds, turtles and alligators there. Heflick and Navarro are joined by Pugsley, a 13 ft. Burmese python.

At 17 feet, 7 inches (5.3 meters) in length, it is the largest snake of its kind found in the state and it was carrying a record 87 eggs. Scientists say the finding highlights how dangerously comfortable the invasive species has become in its new home.

"This thing is monstrous, it's about a foot wide," said Kenneth Krysko, of the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida. "It means these snakes are surviving a long time in the wild, there's nothing stopping them and the native wildlife are in trouble."

The giant female python was discovered in the Everglades National Park and had been stored since May in a freezer at the museum; on Friday, researchers at the museum studied its internal anatomy, making the wild discovery.

Florida is the world capital for invasive reptiles and amphibians, and the Burmese python, native to Southeast Asia, is one of the state's most prominent new residents. The snake was introduced to Florida by the exotic pet trade three decades ago and is now one of the region's deadliest and most competitive predators. [See Photos of Record Burmese Python]

"They were here 25 years ago, but in very low numbers and it was difficult to find one because of their cryptic behavior," Krysko said in a statement from the University of Florida. "Now, you can go out to the Everglades nearly any day of the week and find a Burmese python. We've found 14 in a single day."

Officials worry that the snakes pose a threat to humans, as well as to native, endangered species, which turn up in the pythons' stomachs. This record-breaking, 164.5-pound (75-kg) specimen found in Everglades National Park had feathers in its belly that will be identified by museum ornithologists, the researchers said. Research published this year suggested the pythons are not only eating the Everglades' birds but they're also snatching, and likely swallowing whole birds' eggs.

Population estimates for the Burmese python in Florida range from the thousands to hundreds of thousands, the researchers said. Studying this massive female specimen with dozens of babies on board could help scientists understand how to curb the spread of the python and other invasive animals.

"By learning what this animal has been eating and its reproductive status, it will hopefully give us insight into how to potentially manage other wild Burmese pythons in the future," Krysko said.

Previous state records for Burmese pythons found in the wild were 16.8 feet (5.1 meters) long and 85 eggs, the researchers said.

http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/201...-Florida-video
 
Old August 14th, 2012 #109
N.B. Forrest
Senior Member
 
N.B. Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Virginia, CSA
Posts: 11,145
N.B. Forrest
Default

The usually low-rent, tatted-up assholes who bought these damn things to cover up for their tiny pricks then released them into the wild when they grew to toddler-eating size ought to be publicly flayed alive.....
 
Old August 14th, 2012 #110
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,373
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by N.B. Forrest View Post
The usually low-rent, tatted-up assholes who bought these damn things to cover up for their tiny pricks then released them into the wild when they grew to toddler-eating size ought to be publicly flayed alive.....
Yeah, owning a Burmese is like an IQ test: if you own one, you fail the test. They do not stop growing. There's nothing anyone short of a zoo owner can do with a twelve-foot snake.

If you have to have a python, get a ball python. They stay thick and small and rolled in a ball.
 
Old August 14th, 2012 #111
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,373
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by N.B. Forrest View Post
The usually low-rent, tatted-up assholes who bought these damn things to cover up for their tiny pricks then released them into the wild when they grew to toddler-eating size ought to be publicly flayed alive.....
Funny, your comment made me realize these should be called "muscle snakes." That's the appeal of them to the set you mentioned. The appeal to the tards must be the snakes look like they're on roids. Snake equivalent of pit bulls or other tuff dogs.

I had a lot of snakes growing up, but they were colubrids. Constrictors like boas and pythons, but much slimmer, North American snakes. Good honest respectable snakes. Ratsnakes and kingsnakes. If they had legs, they would drive to a Protestant service, of a Sunday morning.
 
Old August 14th, 2012 #112
Big_Tony
Junior Member
 
Big_Tony's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 5
Big_Tony
Default

There have been reports of king cobras being caught in the Everglades. It takes a real nut case to own a venomous reptile as a pet. Now there are people who have exotic venomous reptiles and they raise them to sell.

In less then 20 years I bet cobras will be found in Florida commonly. This is crazy stuff. We need to get rid of these exotic pets and probably their owners should be locked up in mental wards.

Big Tony
 
Old August 14th, 2012 #113
Angel Ramsey
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 6,145
Default


Now, that was a small gator. They will eat larger ones.

Quote:


Updated September 5, 2006—Unfortunately for a 13-foot (4-meter) Burmese python in Florida's Everglades National Park, eating the enemy seems to have caused the voracious reptile to bust a gut—literally.

Wildlife researchers with the South Florida Natural Resources Center found the dead, headless python in October 2005 after it apparently tried to digest a 6-foot-long (2-meter-long) American alligator. The mostly intact dead gator was found sticking out of a hole in the midsection of the python, and wads of gator skin were found in the snake's gastrointestinal tract.

The gruesome discovery suggests that the python's feisty last meal might have been simply too much for it to handle.

An alternative theory will be put forth in a September 16 Explorer episode on the National Geographic Channel.

(National Geographic News is part of the National Geographic Society, which is part owner of the National Geographic Channel.)

An animated recreation of the python-alligator battle suggests that the python might have survived its massive meal but that a second gator came to the rescue and bit off the snake's head. The force of the tussle, the new theory says, is what caused the python to burst.

But even scientists associated with the show aren't so sure the new theory holds water.

Wayne King, reptile curator at the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville, cites the relatively clean decapitation of the snake. "Alligators, they don't bite off a piece," he told McClatchey Newspapers. "They grab hold, then they roll and spin. If one grabs you by the arm, normally they wrench the arm off, or if they grab you by the buttocks, they'll rip away a chunk of meat."

Clashes between alligators and pythons have been on the rise in the Everglades for the past 20 years. Unwanted pet snakes dumped in the swamp have thrived, and the Asian reptile is now a major competitor in the alligator's native ecosystem. (See "Huge, Freed Pet Pythons Invade Florida Everglades.")

"Clearly if [pythons] can kill an alligator, they can kill other species," Frank Mazzotti, a University of Florida wildlife professor, told the Associated Press. "There had been some hope that alligators can control Burmese pythons. … This [event] indicates to me it's going to be an even draw."
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...eatsgator.html
 
Old November 29th, 2012 #114
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,373
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

Giant snake vomits an entire cow in Brazil

Wed, 28 Nov 2012

A video posted on YouTube of an giant snake regurgitating an entire cow has gone viral, ratcheting up over 700,000 views on YouTube in the just five days.

In the minute and half clip, a green anaconda with a large bump in its scaly body can be seen writhing on the shallow river bed. The snake then proceeds to open its mouth and throw up the entire undigested carcass of the animal into the jungle swamp.

The sickening video was posted on the site by MrCocktail888 on 23 November and was allegedly filmed in Brazil. Whilst the reasons for the anaconda to vomit his prey are unknown, it could be because the animal felt threatened and needed to regurgitate its food in order to make a quick escape if needed.

The South American snake is known to feast on a variety of animals, from fish and birds, to deer and even jaguars. The largest animal on record to have been consumed by a constrictor is a 59-kg impala, eaten by a 4.8m long African rock python in 1955.

Not everyone is convinced that the regurgitated dinner was indeed a cow. Some YouTube commentators have said the creature might actually be a capybara, a large guinea-pig like rodent that is native to South America.

The green anaconda is a type of boa constrictor, a non-venomous snake that kills its prey through coiling round its victim and squeezing until they suffocate. The stretchy ligaments of their jaws mean they can swallow any animal whole, meaning that a cow would have been no problem to eat.

Pound for pound the green anaconda is the largest snake in the world. When fully grown, the reptile can measure more than 8.8m and weigh more than 230kg, according to National Geographic.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...=feeds-newsxml

Last edited by Alex Linder; November 29th, 2012 at 03:06 PM.
 
Old November 29th, 2012 #115
Mike in Denver
Enkidu
 
Mike in Denver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Under the Panopticon.
Posts: 4,171
Mike in Denver
Default

Quote:
...more than 8.8m and weigh more than 230kg...
Nearly 29 feet long. 506 lbs. That's not a snake. That's a dinosaur.

Mike
__________________
You have to remember I live in Denver and some things are perfectly legal here that aren't where you live.
 
Old November 29th, 2012 #116
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 45,373
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike in Denver View Post
Nearly 29 feet long. 506 lbs. That's not a snake. That's a dinosaur.

Mike

There's a video of the thing. Someone can post it, my adobe flash keeps crash.

I fucking hate adobe, worst company in software.
 
Old November 29th, 2012 #117
N.B. Forrest
Senior Member
 
N.B. Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Virginia, CSA
Posts: 11,145
N.B. Forrest
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
There's a video of the thing. Someone can post it, my adobe flash keeps crash.

I fucking hate adobe, worst company in software.
Hallelujah and amen.
__________________
"First: Do No Good." - The Hymiecratic Oath

"The man who does not exercise the first law of nature—that of self preservation — is not worthy of living and breathing the breath of life." - John Wesley Hardin
 
Old November 29th, 2012 #118
N.B. Forrest
Senior Member
 
N.B. Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Virginia, CSA
Posts: 11,145
N.B. Forrest
Default

Quote:
Funny, your comment made me realize these should be called "muscle snakes." That's the appeal of them to the set you mentioned. The appeal to the tards must be the snakes look like they're on roids. Snake equivalent of pit bulls or other tuff dogs.
Yeah - the tats/ear-disks cunts. The Tank-Toppers, forever showing off their "guns"....

Quote:
I had a lot of snakes growing up, but they were colubrids. Constrictors like boas and pythons, but much slimmer, North American snakes. Good honest respectable snakes. Ratsnakes and kingsnakes. If they had legs, they would drive to a Protestant service, of a Sunday morning.
Real Amurricuns, by gawd - not wetback serpentes trash!

This forum software is inconsistent in its new post heads-upping.

It's denying me my RIGHTFUL opportunities to OPINE.....
__________________
"First: Do No Good." - The Hymiecratic Oath

"The man who does not exercise the first law of nature—that of self preservation — is not worthy of living and breathing the breath of life." - John Wesley Hardin
 
Old November 30th, 2012 #119
Hunter Morrow
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,802
Hunter Morrow
Default

I've never had the pythons or boas. They just get too large and honestly, they are kind of fat and lazy. Curl up and hide somewhere, don't do shit. The other variety of snakes are way more active.

I've had king snakes, pine snakes, corn snakes and rat snakes caught from Wisconsin which get to be long, are quite beautiful, never, ever have I had a feeding issue with them, either. I've also collected Hognose snakes and was able to get them to not only eat their natural diet of frogs, toads, salamanders and lizards but frozen prepared foods and freshly killed mice and rats.

Also, when you get through with them, you can just let the snake go because they are native to where you live. They will not be "domesticated" and they will go straight back into the forest, park, grain silo or field you found them and do their thing.

States are being overrun by people who do what I did with hognosed snakes with anacondas, burmese pythons, reticulated pythons, etc. They are 15, 20+ fucking feet modern day dinosaurs. From the thread, that is a great term for them. Apart from zoos and pro herpetologists, nobody should own them. You have to get a license to own 2 dogs in America but any shit-for-brains can go down to the pet shop and buy legit 15+ footers menaces to ecology and society.

Everybody gets them when they are cute but they don't conceive of it being 50 pounds of pure muscle and wrath that laughs at the pet store rat and wants to be fed rabbits and broaster roosters.

Good luck, fucker. Those things will literally eat you out of house and home. Until you throw 'em out the car down south. Like a loser.

Edit: My suggestion for people with hard-ons for owning pythons and boas would be to get Australian pythons. Beauty, activity, appropriate size and demeanor. Ah, but if you got one of those, it wouldn't add 2 inches to your dick, now would it, Cleatus?

Last edited by Hunter Morrow; November 30th, 2012 at 12:24 PM.
 
Old November 30th, 2012 #120
N.B. Forrest
Senior Member
 
N.B. Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Virginia, CSA
Posts: 11,145
N.B. Forrest
Default

Some snakes have beautifully colored markings and are interesting to watch, but I like my pets to be capable of affection and play. Snakes seem to just be mindless predators.
__________________
"First: Do No Good." - The Hymiecratic Oath

"The man who does not exercise the first law of nature—that of self preservation — is not worthy of living and breathing the breath of life." - John Wesley Hardin
 
Reply

Tags
snakes

Share


Thread
Display Modes


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:01 AM.
Page generated in 0.24103 seconds.