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Old March 4th, 2008 #1
Alex Linder
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There is one college founded specifically for homeschoolers - Patrick Henry College in Purcellville, Virginia.
 
Old March 4th, 2008 #2
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This is the image they use on their home page.



Note the absence of non-whites. The home page of virtually every other college you pull up will feature muds mixed with white females - with perhaps one or two white males in passive positions in the deep background. Almost uniformly that is the case.
 
Old March 4th, 2008 #3
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Home page:

http://www.phc.edu/
 
Old March 4th, 2008 #4
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[White Christians actively doing battle with jewed culture.]

Dr. Aikman Debunks ‘New Atheism’

February 15, 2008

Confronting a series of “New Atheists” books that have topped bestseller lists in the last two years, Dr. David Aikman, Associate Professor of History at Patrick Henry College, presented the College’s sixth Faith and Reason lecture Tuesday, February 19. As with the previous, twice-yearly lectures, covering themes from philosophy to classical education, the campus community gathered together for a day-long schedule of discussion groups, Q&A, and panel discussions.

“We need to know what the New Atheists are saying and why, in many instances, they simply don’t make sense,” summarized Aikman.

The four books under discussion were Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon by Daniel Dennett, The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins, Letter to a Christian Nation by Sam Harris, and God is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher Hitchens. Each author posits, from different angles, tenets common to atheistic philosophers: namely, that science proves that God doesn’t exist, that religion makes people do bad things, and that, by contrast, atheism is at worst a benign influence on history and events.

Throughout his lecture, Dr. Aikman contrasted Christian and atheistic worldviews as two opposing faiths, and then frequently used the authors’ own words to dismantle their merging themes.

Collectively, these men, whom Aikman calls the “Four Horsemen,” regularly distort reality and ignore historical fact by not merely dismissing the countless good deeds done by people of faith, but in some instances flippantly insulting such respected figures as Mother Theresa and Martin Luther King, Jr.

“Because King failed to preach hell and damnation,” Aikman noted, “he is relegated by Hitchens to the ranks of the infidels. This would certainly be news to every single African-American who knew King or worked with him, or for that matter to the Nobel Committee that awarded him the Nobel Peace Price in 1964 and made the observation, ‘Martin Luther King’s belief is rooted first and foremost in the teachings of Christ.’”

Another fatal weakness of the New Atheism, he noted, can be summed up in the term “scientism,” or “the assertion that science, as we know it, contains the answer to virtually everything. The Four Horsemen seem to have constructed an arid universe wherein dwells no God, no transcendence, no mystery other than what can be conjured from contemplating physical nature itself.”

With a deep sense of irony, Aikman also cited the unlikely elevation of Albert Einsten as a hero to the New Atheists. That group, he says, perhaps intentionally overlooked the theoretical physicist’s overt, some would say Judeo-Christian spirituality, as illustrated in quotes like: “What separates me from most so-called atheists is a feeling of utter humility toward the unattainable secrets of the harmony of the cosmos.”

Finally, Aikman validated complaints about “the wickedness of atheistic leaders or regimes” by citing the 100 million people “murdered” by the atheistic regimes of Hitler, Stalin [falsified history: the USSR was set up by jews, who concived and ran the 'Gulag archipelago' in which the millions were murdered. There is no contradiction between being a jew and an atheist], Pol Pot in the twentieth century alone. It is a record of atrocity, he says, that dwarfs all those killed in all the religious wars of history.

In one of his more amusing anecdotes, Aikman dryly debunked the so-called “Monkey Theorem” offered up by scientists attempting to explain the unaccountably intricate order and harmony seen in the universe. The theorem posits that an infinite number of monkeys, given an infinite number of keyboards and infinite time, could eventually produce a great work of literature like Shakespeare’s Sonnet Eighteen.

Aikman countered: “In the 1990’s, the British National Council of the Arts… placed six monkeys in a cage with a computer. After banging away at the keyboard for a whole month— the monkeys had typed 50 pages but failed to produce a single word in the English language, not even the letter ‘a’ by itself.”

Reciting the elegant sonnet in his mellifluous English accent, Dr. Aikman quoted statistics that show chances of replicating Sonnet Eighteen, word for word, were roughly ten to the 690th power. “There are only ten to the 80th particles in the entire universe,” he said, observing that “even if every particle in the universe were a computer chip that had been spinning out random letters a million times a second since the beginning of time, there would still be no Shakespeare’s Sonnet Eighteen by chance.”

Quoting one-time atheist Antony Flew, since converted to theism, he concluded: “If the [Monkey Theorem] won’t work for a single sonnet, then of course it’s simply absurd to suggest that the more elaborate feat of the origin of life could have been achieved by chance.”

He ended his lecture by making a direct connection between the Judeo-Christian worldview and freedom: “The only systems of government that have spontaneously created, then preserved, conditions both for religious freedom and then political freedom are those that have emerged from the Judeo-Christian tradition. The only true democracy in the Middle East is Israel, also a Jewish state.” [Flat out lie. Israel is a racist, jewish state that does not allow non-jews to own land or marry jews.]

Students found the experience intellectually stimulating, as always.

“I was really struck by [Dr. Aikman’s] conclusion, that Christians are the ones out there making a difference in the world,” shares Aubrey Waters, a junior. “The Bible says, ‘you will be known by your fruits.’ Christians and atheists live their lives in very different ways.”

Dr. Aikman's new book, Delusion of Disbelief, is due for release in April.

Listen to the lecture, or read full text of Dr. Aikman’s speech here.

http://www.phc.edu/news/docs/20080220Media.asp
 
Old March 4th, 2008 #5
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Institutional Mission, Vision, and Distinctives

The Mission of Patrick Henry College is to prepare Christian men and women who will lead our nation and shape our culture with timeless biblical values and fidelity to the spirit of the American founding. Educating students according to a classical liberal arts curriculum, and training them with apprenticeship methodology, the College provides academically excellent baccalaureate level higher education with a biblical world view.

The Vision of Patrick Henry College is to aid in the transformation of American society by training Christian students to serve God and mankind with a passion for righteousness, justice and mercy, through careers of public service and cultural influence.

The Distinctives of Patrick Henry College include practical apprenticeship methodology; a deliberate outreach to home schooled students; financial independence; a general education core based on the classical liberal arts; a dedication to mentoring and discipling Christian students; and a community life that promotes virtue, leadership, and strong, life-long commitments to God, family and society.

The Mission of the Department of Government is to promote practical application of biblical principles and the original intent of the founding documents of the American republic, while preparing students for lives of public service, advocacy and citizen leadership.

The Mission of the Department of Classical Liberal Arts is to provide students with a broad background in classical languages, logic, rhetoric, Biblical studies, history, English composition and literature, philosophy, science, and mathematics. They will encounter a multiplicity of ideas animating the world's great leaders and thinkers of the past in order to see how God has worked in and continues to work in His creation.
 
Old March 4th, 2008 #6
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Prospective students and parents

[email protected]
 
Old March 4th, 2008 #7
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This is a school with a mission. It might well be worth paying to attend, if you're looking for a true liberal arts school. It is clear there from the jew-subservient use of 'Judeo-Christian' and "Israel is a democracy" bilge that this school is owned on matters related to foreign policy, but on abortion and other social issues, it is anti-jew in effect if not in term. As I say, looks like a good place to study liberal arts. Those places are hard to find these days. All state institutions are dominated by judeo-marxists in the 'soft' fields.
 
Old March 4th, 2008 #8
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A Letter from the Chancellor

Michael Farris, Chancellor

I welcome you to Patrick Henry College as we embark on a critical new chapter in our history. Entering this new phase in our mission to train Christian men and women to lead our nation and impact the culture for Christ, it is hard to express my excitement at the recent changes we’ve seen. First, we have a new President, Dr. Graham Walker, an evangelical Christian educator and leader with extensive academic credentials, who has written eloquently about the trend of Christian colleges drifting from their biblical roots. Dr. Walker is a man who has devoted his life to higher education, and who understands that no matter how excellent the education, if hearts and minds are not constantly submitted in humility to the Lordship of Jesus, men can be tempted to seek the world’s acceptance on intellectual or philosophical terms and too often lose sight of spiritual truth. Just as importantly, our new President understands, through his own sincere walk of faith, that the facts are always on God’s side and that Truth has nothing to fear from genuine learning.

I am also excited about our new Dean of Academic Affairs, Dr. Gene Edward Veith, formerly the cultural editor of World and a long-time educator and proponent of classical learning. To his new post Dr. Veith brings 25 years of experience as a professor and administrator in both Christian and secular colleges, as well a catalog of books he has authored critiquing American culture and higher education. In his systematic documentation of the need for a strong Christian influence in all aspects of society, Dr. Veith promotes a vision shared by President Walker and myself for Christian higher education grounded in Scripture and honoring toward the traditions of classical education that undergird western civilization. With their extensive academic and theological credentials, both of these fine men are alert to the threat of philosophical error and biblical compromise wherever it may occur. Their keen insights will help ensure that PHC stays true to its mission of rigorous academic inquiry balanced by fidelity to the Word of God.

Among PHC’s faculty and staff are many new faces as well, high caliber Christians and academics who embrace the mission of the College and understand the importance of properly balancing faith and reason in the classroom. Ultimately, it is our faculty who equips our students and who must strike the proper balance by teaching all subjects from a biblical worldview. The College is now operating with its largest faculty to date, and I am confident that, together, we will continue to build on PHC’s exceptional academic program.

I am also eager to begin my new role as Chancellor of Patrick Henry College. After six years of running PHC, this position will free me to spend my time building and promoting the College through writing, speaking, and fundraising. It is a role I relish and eagerly anticipate, more so as I assess the quality of leadership now assembled. I am blessed to play a part in what I consider truly to be a dream team of Christian higher education, and I have no doubt that top faculty and students will continue to be drawn to PHC’s exacting classical learning in a campus setting that fosters spiritual growth and discipleship. In this capacity, I see PHC’s influence in the world of higher education – and in advancing the mission of Christ –only growing.

Now more than ever, Patrick Henry College is poised to carry out its stated mission. Whatever changes or challenges we face, our new leadership is committed to fostering an environment of academic excellence and attesting to the Lordship of Jesus Christ and authority of the Bible. Through our leadership, faculty and staff, we seek to accomplish God’s greater glory in the broader mission of the College and to always build on the foundation of the gospel of Jesus Christ in the students we serve.

I am thankful to all for joining us in this important year, and for choosing Patrick Henry College.

Sincerely,

Michael Farris
Chancellor

http://www.phc.edu/about/ChancellorsGreeting.asp
 
Old March 4th, 2008 #9
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Apparently jew-free board of trustees:

http://www.phc.edu/about/trustees/default.asp
 
Old March 4th, 2008 #10
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Shakeup at Patrick Henry College

New president and academic dean announced after 5 of school's 16 faculty quit in protest.

Sheryl Henderson Blunt in Purcellville, Va.

5/15/2006

A contentious debate at Patrick Henry College that began over theological differences, the interpretation of Scripture, and academic freedom has prompted 5 of the school's 16 full-time faculty members to announce they will not be returning to the conservative, Christian college next year. The announcements bring the total number of departing professors to nine in the past year, not including two adjuncts, as well as four senior executives who left in the past 18 months, departing professors say.

In the wake of the departures, the school announced significant changes to the school's executive staff. Effective July 1, Graham Walker, previously vice president for academic affairs and dean of Oklahoma Wesleyan University, will replace Farris as president, while Farris will assume the college's chancellor position. Gene Edward Veith, currently the cultural editor of World Magazine and a former English professor, will also begin that day as the college's new academic dean.

Founded with the high hopes of becoming an "evangelical Ivy League" institution dedicated to producing the next generation of Christian politicians and leaders, the Northern Virginia-based college in Purcellville has received national attention for its conservative Christian theology and mission. It draws a majority of its students from home-schooling families.

Michael Farris, a constitutional lawyer and general counsel of the Home School Legal Defense Association, founded the school in 2000 as a "Christian college blending classical instruction with apprenticeship methodology." It prides itself on the high number of White House internships secured by its students, whose SAT scores average over 1300.

"We were brought here on false pretenses," said David Noe, assistant professor of classics who has taught at Patrick Henry since its founding. "We are leaving due to a long train of abuses by Farris in violating both academic freedom and due process, as well as many other issues relating to Farris's running of the college."

Departing professors also cite Farris's treatment of government instructor Erik Root and his March firing of Robert Stacey, the chairman of the college's department of government, as additional reasons that confirmed their decisions to leave the 350-student college.

Noe, Root, and rhetoric and theology professor Todd Bates agreed to go public with Christianity Today earlier this month, they said, after Farris repeatedly denied their requests to respond to accusations that beliefs they had expressed were biblically unsound. "Farris said that we threatened the college's fidelity to its mission and vision," said Noe. "He spoke to the press, but told us we couldn't."

Farris did not respond to multiple requests by CT for an interview, but told The Chronicle of Higher Education that he wonders why the professors are still leaving now that he is no longer president. "If I'm the problem—well, I'm going to be gone," he said.

Walker, the new president, told CT the high faculty turnover in one year was regrettable. "These gentlemen made good contributions to the growth of the college," said Walker. "It's regrettable to lose them. I also know that turnover is a fact of life at every collegiate institution."

The Lifeboat

The debate reached a head when Root published an article entitled "Of St. Augustine, the Teacher, and Politics" in the campus publication The Source. The piece argued that St. Augustine "deserves to be called a Saint because he was instrumental in making political philosophy palpable to Christians and vice versa. … [He] taught Christians how to engage the culture around them."

Soon after its publication, Root learned his contract was being "temporarily withdrawn" based on the article as well as a complaint from a student's parent over his use of the "lifeboat example" in class. Root said the illustration was used to explain Thomas Hobbes's state of nature argument. "Acting academic dean [Marian Sanders] told me I couldn't use that any more," said Root. "She said that there are some questions we can't ask in class or entertain."

In a February 28 e-mail message, Farris asked Root to respond to seven "questions."

"The overall question is the fidelity to the biblical worldview in your role at PHC," stated Farris. The letter claimed "the well-known 'lifeboat' game" was "a recognized tool of those who wish to contend that there are no absolute values." It further asked for an "explanation about this episode and the underlying philosophy that this represents."

"I thought it was an academic freedom issue," said Root, adding that he did not respond to Farris's questions as his contract had already been pulled.

In March, five professors resolved not to sign their contracts for the following year based largely on Root's suspended contract. The decision stemmed from a previous agreement nine professors made last fall, said Noe. "Many of us, including the five of us who left, made an informal agreement to do everything to defend anyone who was wrongly terminated, including leaving."

Among them were Root, Noe, Bates, Stacey, and history and literature professor Kevin Culberson, and Robert Stacey. "The gravity of this decision is underscored by the fact that, at the time, only one of us had a job lined up for next year," said Culberson.
General revelation

On March 8 another Source article, this one by Noe and Culberson entitled "The Role of General Revelation in Education," again prompted the administration's response.

"A common misconception among American evangelicals, and one that cannot be supported by the Scriptures themselves, is that the Bible is the only source of truth," the article began. "We argue that this misconception amounts to a blasphemous denial of Christ's words in Matthew 5 that 'he sends rain on the just and the unjust.'"

The 900-word article argued that "a Christian must refuse to view special and general revelation as hostile to one another. Nor should he hesitate to learn from a pagan. There is much wisdom to be gained from Parmenides and Plato, as well Machiavelli and Marx."

The article prompted a 2,600-word response by college chaplain Raymond Bouchoc, sent to students, faculty, and staff. The response, endorsed by Farris and Sanders, discussed seven "harmful implications" that could be drawn from the professors' article and claimed the piece "diminishes the import of Scripture."

The official response prompted Noe, Root, Culberson, Stacey, and, later, Bates to turn in letters of non-intent stating they would not be signing their contracts for the following school year. The next day, in a March 17 "Q&A" with the campus newspaper, The Patrick Henry Herald, Farris said the resigning professors "quit because the leadership utilized academic freedom. If somebody wants to quit because they believe we have too strong of a view of the Bible, then so be it. I believe God's going to bless us for standing up for his Word."

"For the president to say this implies that these men were somehow guilty of blasphemies or heresy," said Paul Bonicelli, PHC's former dean of academic affairs and government professor. "That's not something any Christian should say about another Christian unless you are absolutely sure they have uttered blasphemies or heresy, and we are terribly far away from that here."

Scriptural fidelity

Farris again took aim at the professors in a March 23 letter to the parents of current students. "Some of their teaching and on-campus publications raised what I believed were legitimate questions about fidelity to the Scriptures," the letter stated.

"Two of us are ordained in conservative denominations, and the notion that we have a low view of Scripture shouldn't in fact be tolerated without evidence," said Noe, who is ordained as a ruling elder in the Orthodox Presbyterian Church and preaches in nearby churches. Culberson is ordained as a ruling elder in the Presbyterian Church in America. "There is a strong sense that the charges made against us and our Christian beliefs have detrimental ramifications in our respective churches."

Noe and Root said Farris repeatedly denied requests to respond to the public charges. "He accused us of being less than Christian, then told us we couldn't respond," said Noe.

Stacey's firing

Amid the controversy, on March 31 Stacey read the school's statement of faith aloud in his class and asked students to decide if he had been unfaithful to it. If they agreed, they could leave. "He said, if you think I have an unbiblical worldview, you shouldn't be listening to me," said one student. Another student then immediately left the classroom to report the comments to Farris, multiple sources confirmed.

"At 2 p.m., Farris cut Bob's phone and e-mail while he was in class," said Noe. "Then he called him to a 4 p.m. meeting where he fired him. He told him he had until 8:45 a.m. the next morning to apologize and recant; otherwise he'd lose his job. What Bob did in class was attempt to publicly address this after repeated requests to the president, and when he did he was fired. … We believe that Bob's firing was Farris's attempt to keep us quiet."

Farris told reporters that he fired Stacey because "he asked students to take sides."

The gag order

On April 5, professors Noe, Culberson, and Root received a written response from Farris declaring that it would be "unprofessional and unchristian" to publicly declare their reasons for leaving.

"A public declaration would serve only your personal purposes to appear to be vindicated in the eyes of the students," he said. "That is an unprofessional and unchristian motive. … In short, no, you do not have my permission to publicly discuss your reasons for departure."

The professors then asked in a reply if Farris would make the gag order public "so that [students] can understand why we may not answer their questions, though they continue to ask us with much anguish and sometimes suspicion."

In an abrupt turnaround on April 7, Farris sent an e-mail to faculty, staff, and students, stating that previous press statements he had made about the professors' departure "did not fully reveal my heart."

"There is no doubt in my mind that all the professors, past and present, at PHC are sincere born-again believers who truly embrace the college's statement of faith," he said. "Moreover, I believe they have a sincere desire to honor the Bible as God's authoritative Word."

St. Augustine in Hell

According to the school's statement of doctrinal neutrality, Patrick Henry College "welcomes all people who have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ" and "does not take sides on certain doctrinal matters that often separate … believers." The statement reads: "The College itself is neutral on the doctrinal distinctives which go beyond the points covered in our Statement of Faith and are outside the mission of the College."

Farris, a Baptist minister, has publicly expressed views that have shocked some professors and students.

"He said St. Augustine was in hell," said Root. "I heard it with my own ears." Other professors and students said Farris has repeatedly disparaged Calvinist theology.

"There is a sense that you face antagonism as someone who is theologically Reformed," said Bates, who sparred with Farris over a speech he was planning to deliver at the college's annual Faith and Reason Lecture, and again over the use of Wayne Grudem's Systematic Theology textbook. According to Bates, Farris considered it "too Reformed."

"We are put in a hard position," said Bates. "We're told this is an open dialogue, but if you engage in open dialogue, you're in trouble. It's infuriating because you're an academic and want to engage in ideas."

Bates said that at a meeting with Farris, "He told me that a person of the Reformed position to which I hold cannot in good conscience sign the statement of faith. When I responded that I failed to see the discrepancy between the two, he replied, 'I define the statement of faith.'"

A new direction?

In an interview with CT, incoming president Walker spoke glowingly of the college's commitment to academic freedom. "We at PHC are not afraid of learning at any time because the facts are always on God's side," said Walker. "Our knowledge of error is important, so certain subjects being out of bounds is just not so." Walker said that he and Farris "welcome disagreement. It's part of the richness of an academic institution."

The large number of departures could impact the college's accreditation if changes are not made and positions filled. The Transnational Association of Christian Colleges and Schools (TRACS) is currently considering the college for accreditation.

Due to the young college's unaccredited status, students who leave the school may not be able to transfer their credits. Under Virginia law, the school has until November of 2007 to become accredited or risk losing the right to call itself a degree-granting college. Patrick Henry has so far sought accreditation from the American Academy for Liberal Education and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, but was denied. While it could still re-apply, the college is currently exclusively pursuing TRACS, according to its website.

Professors interviewed for this article said it was not revenge, but rather their commitment to the college's liberal arts vision that compelled them to go public.

Said Noe, "It seems to us that only public scrutiny will make this institution healthy."

http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/.../120-12.0.html

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Old March 4th, 2008 #11
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Patrick Henry College was incorporated in 1998 by Michael Farris, founder of the Home School Legal Defense Association. It officially opened September 20, 2000, with a class of 92 students. Since then the school has grown to approximately 325 students. Because the school does not ask for race on applications the ethnic demographics are unknown. The college refuses to accept any federal financial aid and therefore is relieved from Department of Education reporting requirements on the racial makeup of its student body.[6]

Patrick Henry College receives all of its funding from tuition money or personal donors. The college states that it does not accept any money "from government, or any other source that includes terms which supersede the authority of our Board of Trustees or conflict with our foundational statements. Patrick Henry College also operates without debt, adding new facilities and programs only as funds are available. Instead, we rely heavily on the generous giving of families across the country to meet our financial obligations." [7] The Home School Legal Defense Association remains one of the primary benefactors of the school and all members of the association receive a thirteen hundred dollar grant if accepted as students.[8] [9]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Henry_College
 
Old March 4th, 2008 #12
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Media attention

The school has been the subject of media attention from its inception, attracting reports from every major network and cable news organization, and being the subject of articles in Time,[2] The New Yorker,[10] The Economist,[11] the New York Times,[12] and others. Most recently, the college was the subject of the television documentary God's Next Army, which aired in the spring of 2006 on Britain's Channel 4 and the Discovery Times Channel in the United States.[13] Initial media interest stemmed from the fact that the college deliberately sought students with homeschooled backgrounds.[14] As time went on, it also attracted notice because of a perceived closeness with the Bush administration, which had given the school's students a number of White House internships and opportunities. In the spring of 2004, of the almost 100 student interns working in the White House, seven were from Patrick Henry College, which had only 240 students at the time.[12] This is the same number of interns Georgetown University had during the same period.[15] Hanna Rosin, a well-known writer who has covered religion and politics for the Washington Post, the New Yorker, The New Republic, GQ, and the New York Times, wrote a book about Patrick Henry College entitled, "God's Harvard: A Christian College on a Mission to Save America", released September 10, 2007.[16] Additionally, the college's moot court team is the subject of an independent feature film being produced by Advent Film Group, a startup Christian production company. The film will be marketed primarily to a homeschooling audience, with production already completed and release planned for Spring 2008.[17]
 
Old March 4th, 2008 #13
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British documentary on PHC: "God's Next Army" (2006)

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-7630851222567912489


Skip first 2:30, earlier show.

Last edited by Alex Linder; March 4th, 2008 at 09:21 PM.
 
Old March 4th, 2008 #14
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Patrick Henry offers many of its core classes online, utilizing ANGEL technology. ANGEL is an online program which hosts chats, forums, uploads, and email for students. This website enables students to participate in a class with other students from their own homes. Tuition for the program is less than the cost of on-campus education.
 
Old March 14th, 2008 #15
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Introducing God's new Harvard
Patrick Henry College's goal is launching leaders for Christ

March 12, 2008


2008 WorldNetDaily

By Alyssa Farah

PURCELLVILLE, Va. – Matthew du Mee was one of more than 2 million college-bound students in 2001 to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test, or SAT.

But he was one of only a tiny handful who received a perfect score.

Within weeks, the nation's most prestigious schools – Harvard, Yale, and Stanford among them – began courting him. Du Mee turned them all down, choosing instead a tiny new school with, at the time, fewer than 100 students, no accreditation and no name outside of homeschooling circles.

The school was Patrick Henry College, created as haven of sorts for the nation's brightest homeschooled students, and which has, in seven ensuing years, grown into a well-known and influential evangelical school purposed to train Christian leaders for high level service in the public square. Its rigorous academic programs, abundant Capitol Hill apprenticeships, and deep homeschooling ties led to its being dubbed "God's Harvard" in a new book by Washington Post religion reporter Hanna Rosin.

http://wnd.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=58673
 
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