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Old July 20th, 2012 #1
John sholtes
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Default Did You know Scott Peterson is a jew?

Did You know Scott Peterson is a jew?

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Old July 20th, 2012 #2
Angel Ramsey
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Is that the guy who murdered his wife, Lacey?
 
Old July 20th, 2012 #3
Steven L. Akins
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Originally Posted by John sholtes View Post
Did You know Scott Peterson is a jew?

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http://answers.yahoo.com/question/in...5101913AA0wDtN
Yahoo answers? Seriously?

You do know that anyone can post anything on there in response to any question.

It has zero credibility.

Scott Peterson attended what is now Cathedral Catholic High School in San Deigo, California.
 
Old July 21st, 2012 #4
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Did You know Scott Peterson is a jew?

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That's it. You're tarded. You are beneath the intellectual level I want for this forum.
 
Old July 21st, 2012 #5
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Now this is a case I happen to know a lot about - I've read all kinds of books on it and done endless research because at first I wasn't convinced Scott was guilty. (there was some pretty compelling evidence to suggest there is or was a baby-sacrificing cult weirdo ring in Modesto) and neither Scott nor Laci are or were jews.
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Old July 21st, 2012 #6
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Now this is a case I happen to know a lot about - I've read all kinds of books on it and done endless research because at first I wasn't convinced Scott was guilty. (there was some pretty compelling evidence to suggest there is or was a baby-sacrificing cult weirdo ring in Modesto) and neither Scott nor Laci are or were jews.
baby-sacrificing cult?

 
Old July 21st, 2012 #7
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baby-sacrificing cult?

Yes, it was one of the theories the defence were exploring. There were some strange satanic paintings on some kind of dump walls near the Bay and in East La Loma Park, where she was supposed to be walking Mackenzie on the morning she disappeared, there were a few transients who were said to be devil worshippers.

There was also some kind of street art made out of the feet of shop dummies and of course Laci's feet were missing; whether this was due to the elements is not known.

There was also a van with "satanic symbols" seen in the area - this was seen on the Xmas Eve by the wife of a council man who lived opposite Laci.

Modesto has had quite a few missing women. Chandra Levy who was alleged to be pregnant by some congress man called Condit, there was another pregnant Mexican woman who disappeared from the hotel where she worked as a chambermaid, and I believe the people who set up the Carole Sund/Carrington foundation had some connection with the area as well. This was one of the things that the defence threw out to try and exonerate Scott.
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Old July 21st, 2012 #8
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to try and
I'm afraid your diagnosis is poisonous exposure to maerakwa.
 
Old July 21st, 2012 #9
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I'm afraid your diagnosis is poisonous exposure to maerakwa.
I don't speak gobbledygook so if you feel like having another try but in something resembling English, I'd be glad to respond.
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Old July 21st, 2012 #10
Steven L. Akins
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Originally Posted by Bev View Post
Yes, it was one of the theories the defence were exploring. There were some strange satanic paintings on some kind of dump walls near the Bay and in East La Loma Park, where she was supposed to be walking Mackenzie on the morning she disappeared, there were a few transients who were said to be devil worshippers.

There was also some kind of street art made out of the feet of shop dummies and of course Laci's feet were missing; whether this was due to the elements is not known.

There was also a van with "satanic symbols" seen in the area - this was seen on the Xmas Eve by the wife of a council man who lived opposite Laci.

Modesto has had quite a few missing women. Chandra Levy who was alleged to be pregnant by some congress man called Condit, there was another pregnant Mexican woman who disappeared from the hotel where she worked as a chambermaid, and I believe the people who set up the Carole Sund/Carrington foundation had some connection with the area as well. This was one of the things that the defence threw out to try and exonerate Scott.
I always laugh whenever police give any serious consideration to there being any sort of organized "devil-worship" cult. Most of what they think of as "devil-worshipers" are nothing more than teenagers who do things like spray-paint graffitti pentagrams or "666" on things to freak people out because they think people will get freaked out if they find a pentagram or "666" spraypainted on something - and sometimes they do; but that is about the extent of it.
 
Old July 21st, 2012 #11
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I always laugh whenever police give any serious consideration to there being any sort of organized "devil-worship" cult. Most of what they think of as "devil-worshipers" are nothing more than teenagers who do things like spray-paint graffitti pentagrams or "666" on things to freak people out because they think people will get freaked out if they find a pentagram or "666" spraypainted on something - and sometimes they do; but that is about the extent of it.
Yes! Been there, done that in my teens. Not spray painting, but I used to wear a pentagram necklace and I had clothing with razor blades and "666" etc on it. Why? To shock. No other reason. Same with Ouija boards. We did them to freak out the other kids in our age group. I wasn't a devil worshipper - didn't (and don't) even believe in the concept of a Satan.

In the Peterson case, someone phoned in a tip about a satanic van and the defence discovered it during discovery and ran with it from there.
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Old July 21st, 2012 #12
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Yes! Been there, done that in my teens. Not spray painting, but I used to wear a pentagram necklace and I had clothing with razor blades and "666" etc on it. Why? To shock. No other reason. Same with Ouija boards. We did them to freak out the other kids in our age group. I wasn't a devil worshipper - didn't (and don't) even believe in the concept of a Satan.

In the Peterson case, someone phoned in a tip about a satanic van and the defence discovered it during discovery and ran with it from there.
Back in the early 1980's there was a rash of child-abuse cases brought to court by the Child Protective Services in which it was alleged that the children (who were in various daycares) were being used in "Satanic" rituals.

It turned out that the children were merely repeating the sort of stories that they had been coached to give by psychologists working for the prosecution.
 
Old July 21st, 2012 #13
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Originally Posted by Steven L. Akins View Post
Back in the early 1980's there was a rash of child-abuse cases brought to court by the Child Protective Services in which it was alleged that the children (who were in various daycares) were being used in "Satanic" rituals.

It turned out that the children were merely repeating the sort of stories that they had been coached to give by psychologists working for the prosecution.
Trouble is, shit like that can affect the children well into adulthood - they end up thinking it actually happened to them and suffer accordingly. My cousin claims to recall childhood toys and minor injuries and so on - many of them were mine or someone else's, not hers and to this day she has habdabs if you remind her of certain things so with something major like child abuse, I would have no trouble believing those kids are now very screwed up adults. I hope they got help.
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Old July 21st, 2012 #14
Steven L. Akins
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Trouble is, shit like that can affect the children well into adulthood - they end up thinking it actually happened to them and suffer accordingly. My cousin claims to recall childhood toys and minor injuries and so on - many of them were mine or someone else's, not hers and to this day she has habdabs if you remind her of certain things so with something major like child abuse, I would have no trouble believing those kids are now very screwed up adults. I hope they got help.
I think a lot of the so-called "Holocaust" was very much something along the same lines.

Quote:
Michelle Remembers and the McMartin preschool trial

In 1980 the book, Michelle Remembers, written by Michelle Smith and husband/psychiatrist Lawrence Pazder, was published. The book, now discredited, was written as an autobiography and was the first known claim linking the abuse of children with Satanic rituals. Pazder was also the individual responsible for coining the term "ritual abuse". It provided a model for allegations of SRA that followed. On the basis of the book's success, Pazder developed a high media profile, gave lectures and training on SRA to law enforcement, and, by September 1990, had acted as a consultant on more than 1,000 SRA cases, including the McMartin preschool trial. Prosecutors used "Michelle Remembers" as a guide when preparing cases against alleged Satanists. Michelle Remembers, along with others portrayed as survivor stories, are suspected to have influenced later allegations of SRA and the book has been suggested as a causal factor in the later epidemic of SRA allegations.

In the early 1980s, during the implementation of mandatory reporting laws there was an exponential increase in child protection investigations in America, Britain and other developed countries and an increased public awareness of child abuse. The investigation of incest allegations in California was also changed, with cases led by social workers using leading and coercive interviewing techniques avoided by police investigators, and alterations to the prosecution of these cases that resulted in a greater number of confessions in exchange for plea bargains from fathers. Shortly thereafter some children in child protection cases began making allegations of horrific physical and sexual abuse by caregivers within organized rituals, disclosing sexual abuse in Satanic rituals and the use of Satanic symbols, garnering the label "satanic ritual abuse" in the media and among professionals. Childhood memories of similar abuse began to appear in the psychotherapy sessions of adults.

In 1983 charges were laid in the McMartin preschool trial, a major case in California, which received attention throughout the United States, and contained allegations of satanic ritual abuse. The case caused tremendous polarization in how to interpret the evidence that was available, and shortly after more than 100 preschools across the country had similar sensationalist allegations eagerly and uncritically reported by the press. Throughout the trial the media coverage against the defendants (Peggy McMartin and Ray Buckey) was unrelentingly negative, focusing only on statements by the prosecution. Smith and other alleged survivors met with parents involved in the trial, and it is believed that they influenced testimony against the accused.

Kee MacFarlane, a social worker employed by the Children's Institute International, developed a new way to interrogate children with anatomically correct dolls and used them in an effort to assist disclosures of abuse with the McMartin children. After asking the children to point to the places on the dolls where they had allegedly been touched and asking leading questions, she diagnosed sexual abuse in virtually all McMartin children, and coerced disclosures using lengthy interviews which rewarded discussions of abuse and punished denials; testimony during the trial was often contradictory and vague on all details except for the assertion that the abuse had occurred. Though the initial charges featured allegations of Satanic abuse and a vast conspiracy, these features were dropped relatively early in the trial and prosecution continued only for non-ritual allegations of child abuse against only two individuals. After three years of testimony, McMartin and Buckey were acquitted on 52 of 65 counts, and the jury was deadlocked on the remaining 13 charges against Buckey, with 11 of 13 jurors choosing not guilty. Buckey was re-charged and two years later released without conviction.

Conspiracy accusations

In 1984 MacFarlane warned a congressional committee of scatological behavior and animals being slaughtered in bizarre rituals which children were forced to watch. Shortly after, the United States Congress doubled its budget for child-protection programs. Psychiatrist Roland Summit delivered conferences in the wake of the McMartin trial and depicted the phenomenon as a conspiracy theory that involved anyone skeptical of the phenomenon. By 1986 social worker Carol Darling argued in a grand jury that the conspiracy reached the government Her husband Brad Darling gave conference presentations about a Satanic conspiracy of great antiquity which he believed now permeated American communities.

By the late 1980s therapists or patients who believed someone had suffered from SRA could suggest solutions that included Christian psychotherapy, exorcism and support groups whose members self-identified as "anti-Satanic warriors." Federal funding was increased for research on child abuse, with large portions of the funding going towards child sexual abuse. Funding was also provided for conferences supporting the idea of SRA, adding a veneer of respectability to the idea as well as offering an opportunity for prosecutors to exchange advice on how to best secure convictions (with tactics including the destruction of notes, refusing to tape interviews with children and destroying or refusing to share evidence with the defense). Had proof been found, SRA would have represented the first occasion where an organized and secret criminal activity had been discovered by mental health professionals. In 1987 Geraldo Rivera produced a national television special on the alleged secret cults, claiming "Estimates are that there are over one million Satanists in [the United States and they are] linked in a highly organized, secretive network." Tapings of this and similar talk show episodes were subsequently used by religious fundamentalists, psychotherapists, social workers and police to promote the idea that a conspiracy of Satanic cults existed and were involved in serious crimes.

In the 1990s psychologist D. Corydon Hammond publicized a detailed theory of ritual abuse drawn from hypnotherapy sessions with his patients, alleging they were victims of a worldwide conspiracy of organized, secretive clandestine cells who used torture, mind control and ritual abuse to create alternate personalities that could be "activated" with codewords and were trained as assassins, prostitutes, drug traffickers, and child sex workers (used to create child pornography). Hammond claimed his patients had revealed the conspiracy was masterminded by a Jewish doctor in Nazi Germany, but who now worked for the Central Intelligence Agency with a goal of worldwide domination by a Satanic cult. The cult was allegedly composed of respectable, powerful members of society who used the funds generated to further their agenda. The patients' lack of memories (and the failure to find evidence for their claims) were cited as evidence of the power and effectiveness of this cult in furthering their agenda. Hammond's claims gained considerable attention, due in part to his prominence in the field of hypnosis and psychotherapy.

Religious roots and secularization

Initial accusations were made in the context of the rising political power of conservative Christianity within the United States, and religious fundamentalists were enthusiastic in promoting rumors of SRA. Psychotherapists who were actively Christian began advocating for the diagnosis of dissociative identity disorder (DID) and soon after accounts similar to Michelle Remembers began to appear, with some therapists believing the alter egos of some patients were the result of demonic possession. Protestantism was instrumental in starting, spreading and maintaining rumours through sermons about the dangers of SRA, lectures by purported experts and prayer sessions, including showings of the 1987 Geraldo Rivera television special. Secular proponents began to appear, and child protection workers became significantly involved. Law enforcement trainers, many themselves strongly religious, became strong promoters of the reality of the claims and became self-described "experts" on the topic. Their involvement in child sexual abuse cases produced more allegations of SRA, adding credibility to phenomenon. As the explanations for SRA were distanced from evangelical Christianity and into the realm of "survivor" groups, the motivations ascribed to purported Satanists shifted from combating a religious nemesis to mind control and abuse as an end to itself. Clinicians, psychotherapists and social workers documented clients alleging histories of SRA though the claims of therapists were unsubstantiated beyond the testimonies of their clients.

International spread

In 1987 a list of 'indicators' was published by Catherine Gould, featuring a broad array of vague symptoms that were ultimately common, non-specific and subjective, capable of diagnosing SRA in most young children. By the late 1980s allegations began to appear throughout the world (including Canada, Australia, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, the Netherlands and Scandinavia), in part enabled by English as a common international language and in at least the United Kingdom assisted by Gould's list of indicators. Belief in SRA spread rapidly through the ranks of mental health professionals (despite an absence of evidence) through a variety of continuing education seminars, during which attendees were urged to believe in the reality of Satanic cults, their alleged victims and to not question the extreme and bizarre memories uncovered. Proof was provided in the form of unconnected bits of information such as pictures drawn by patients, heavy metal album covers, historical folklore about Satan worshippers, and pictures of mutilated animals. During the seminars, patients provided testimonials of their experiences and presenters stressed the importance of recovering memories in order to heal.
In 1986, the largest symposium on child abuse in history was held in Australia, with vocal SRA advocates Kee MacFarlane, Roland Summit, Astrid Heppenstall Heger and David Finkelhor invited to give addresses.
In 1987 writings on the phenomenon appeared in the United Kingdom along with incidents featuring broadly similar accusations such as the Cleveland child abuse scandal; allegations of SRA in Nottingham resulted in the "British McMartin", advised in part by the British journalist Tim Tate's work on the subject. Along with the list of indicators, American conference speakers, pamphlets, source materials, consultants, vocabulary regarding SRA and allegedly funding were imported, which promoted the identification and counseling of British SRA allegations. The Nottingham investigation resulted in criminal charges of severe child abuse that ultimately had nothing to do with Satanic rituals, and was criticized for focusing on the irrelevant and non-existent Satanic aspects of the allegations at the expense of the severe conventional abuse endured by the children.
In 1989, San Francisco police detective Sandi Gallant gave an interview with a newspaper in the United Kingdom. At the same time, several other therapists toured the country giving talks on SRA, and shortly thereafter SRA cases occurred in Orkney, Rochdale, London and Nottingham.
In 1992 charges were laid in the Martensville satanic sex scandal; charges were overturned in 1995 on the grounds of improper interviewing of the children.
A wave of SRA accusations appeared in New Zealand in 1991, and in Norway in 1992.
In 1998 Jean LaFontaine produced a book indicating allegations of SRA in the United Kingdom were sparked by investigations supervised by social workers who had taken SRA seminars in the United States.

Skepticism, rejection and contemporary existence

Media coverage of SRA began to turn negative by 1987, and the "panic" ended between 1992 and 1995. The release of the HBO made-for-TV movie Indictment: The McMartin Trial in 1995 re-cast Ray Buckey as a victim of overzealous prosecution rather than an abusive predator and marked a watershed change in public perceptions of satanic ritual abuse accusations. By 2003 allegations of ritual abuse were met with great skepticism and belief in SRA is no longer considered mainstream in professional circles; although the sexual abuse of children is a real and serious problem, allegations of SRA were essentially false. Reasons for the collapse of the phenomenon include the collapse of criminal prosecution against alleged abusers, a growing number of scholars, officials and reporters questioning the reality of the accusations, and a variety of successful lawsuits against mental health professionals.

Some feminist critics of the SRA diagnoses maintained that, in the course of attempting to purge society of evil, the panic of the 1980s and 1990s obscured real child abuse issues, a concern echoed by Gary Clapton. In England the SRA panic diverted resources and attention from proven cases of abuse and resulted in a hierarchy of abuse in which SRA was the most serious form of abuse, with physical and sexual abuse being minimized, marginalized and "mere" physical abuse no longer worthy of intervention. In addition, as attention towards SRA turned negative, the focus by social workers on SRA resulted in a large loss of credibility to the profession. SRA, with its sensational makeup of many victims abused by many victimizers, ended up robbing the far more common and proven issue of incest of much of its larger significance to society. The National Center for Abuse and Neglect devised the term religious abuse to describe exorcisms, poisonings and drownings of children in non-satanic religious settings in order to avoid confusion with SRA.

A small number of individuals still believe there is credence to allegations of SRA and continue to discuss the topic. Publications by Cathy O'Brien claiming SRA were the result of government programs (specifically the Central Intelligence Agency's Project MKULTRA) to produce Manchurian candidate-style mind control in young children were picked up by conspiracy theorists, linking belief in SRA with claims of government conspiracies. In the book Mistakes were made (but not by me), authors Carol Tavris and Elliot Aronson cite ongoing belief in the SRA phenomenon despite a complete lack of evidence as demonstration of the confirmation bias in believers; it further points out that a lack of evidence is actually considered more evidence, demonstrating "how clever and evil the cult leaders were: They were eating those babies, bones and all."
 
Old July 21st, 2012 #15
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Oooh - I think I remember something about the UK cases. I remember a certain social work department (might have been London) having a higher than usual amount of abuse cases, both Satanic and ordinary and they were all called into doubt when one kid they'd whipped out of its home for severe bruises on the legs turned out to have nothing more than marker pen smudges from the name written in its wellies. It all blew up from there.

This is what bugs me with psychs and so on - we don't understand half and a quarter of what goes on in the mind and so much damage can be done by messing about with it. It's the same with 'Nam syndrome". We're always hearing here about how many Americans are convinced they went to Vietnam and saw and experienced various horrors yet on investigation they never even went. Yet I do believe they seriously think they went.
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Old July 21st, 2012 #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven L. Akins View Post
Back in the early 1980's there was a rash of child-abuse cases brought to court by the Child Protective Services in which it was alleged that the children (who were in various daycares) were being used in "Satanic" rituals.

It turned out that the children were merely repeating the sort of stories that they had been coached to give by psychologists working for the prosecution.
don't be too sure about that.

http://ww.whale.to/b/pedophocracy.ht...Brussels_...__

The Pedophocracy, Part IV: McMolestation
August 2001

"Rarely has such a strange and little-understood organization had such a profound effect on media coverage of such a controversial matter. The [False Memory Syndrome] foundation is an aggressive, well-financed PR machine adept at manipulating the press, harassing its critics, and mobilizing a diverse army of psychiatrists, outspoken academics, expert defense witnesses, litigious lawyers, Freud bashers, critics of psychotherapy, and devastated parents.”
Columbia Journalism Review, July/August 1997


If there's anyone who can relate to the sentiments expressed by the Presidio and West Point parents, it is the mothers and fathers of the children from the McMartin Preschool – and there are literally hundreds of them. The McMartin case was, of course, the largest and most well-publicized of the multi-victim, multi-perpetrator ritual abuse cases that sprang forth in the 1980s.

It was also a case that was grotesquely misrepresented by the media, both mainstream and 'alternative' – perhaps nowhere more so than in the appalling writings of Alexander Cockburn, the allegedly ‘progressive’ Warren Committee apologist. Cockburn went so far as to write an op-ed piece entitled “The McMartin Case: Indict the Children, Jail the Parents,” which ran in The Wall Street Journal on February 8, 1990.

Virtually everyone agrees that the children of McMartin were victimized, the only debate being whether that victimization was by abusive caretakers or by overzealous therapists and prosecutors. Either way, Cockburn’s stance on the case was unconscionable, and should have sent a clear signal to the progressive community that there was considerably more to the McMartin allegations than met the eye.

The harsh reality is that the McMartin Preschool, in conjunction with at least two other Manhattan Beach preschools and one babysitting service, was the center of a massive child prostitution and child pornography ring whose operations were protected and covered up by any number of local, state and federal officials – or so it would appear.

A glimpse of the true nature and scale of the McMartin case is given by an official correspondence from Sergeant Beth Dickerson of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department to Agent Ken Lanning at the FBI Academy Behavioral Sciences Unit in Quantico, Virginia, dated February 10, 1985, and reproduced in Larry Kahaner's Cults That Kill:

“In August 1983, the Manhattan Beach Police Department began an investigation regarding allegations of sexual abuse occurring at the McMartin Preschool ... Altogether, approximately 400 children were evaluated by therapists at Children's Institute International. All interviews were videotaped and 350 children disclosed sexual behavior ...

“In all, the victims named seven teachers (six women and one male) at the preschool as having molested them. These individuals are currently charged with 209 counts of child molestation. Also named are about 30 other individuals still uncharged, as well as numerous unidentified 'strangers.'

“McMartin victims allege sexual abuse occurred on school grounds as well as at a local market, churches, a mortuary, various homes, a farm, a doctor's office, other preschools and other unknown locations ...

“Most children state they were photographed in the nude ... They mention drinking a red or pink liquid that made them sleepy ... Children disclose animal sacrificing (bunnies, ponies, turtles, etc.) and some of this occurred in churches. Victims describe sticks put in their vaginas and rectums and also being 'pooped' and 'peed' on. Children say that the adults sometimes dressed in black robes, formed a circle around them and chanted.

“In May 1984, another preschool investigation began in the same policing jurisdiction stemming from a McMartin victim who identified the Manhattan Ranch Preschool as a place where he was taken and molested ... additional children have begun disclosing sexual abuse (approximately 60) and they have named six or more additional suspects ... These children talk of strangers coming to the school and molesting them, being taken off campus and molested, being photographed nude and some talk of animals being abused. The children talk of being hit with sticks and of being 'peed' and 'pooped' on ...

“[T]he resources of the police department and the District Attorney's office were not sufficient in order to follow up on the multitude of uncharged suspects in both preschools ... The Task Force became operational on November 5, 1984. It should be noted that the Task Force has two other preschools under investigation for alleged sexual abuse in addition to McMartin and Manhattan Ranch. One, the Learning Game Preschool, is clearly linked to McMartin.”

An astounding total of 460 children reported being sexually abused at the three closely-linked Manhattan Beach schools. Even more astounding, investigative author Michael Newton (among others) has noted that Children’s Institute International determined that: “a full eighty percent displayed physical symptoms, including vaginal or rectal scarring, anal bleeding, painful bowel movements, and the 'anal wick reflex' associated with violent penetration.”

The stories told by the victim/witnesses were remarkably similar as to the nature of the abuse, the locations where the abuse took place, and the perpetrators of the abuse. And these were not, as is commonly believed, all preschool children telling these stories; some of the witnesses were former students in their teens and twenties, and their stories corroborated those of the children.

The older witnesses were not allowed to testify at the McMartin trials, however, as the statute of limitations for the crimes committed against them had expired. Many of the younger witnesses were unable to offer testimony as well, for various reasons – most notably because they were too severely traumatized. Even so, as author Jan Hollingsworth has pointed out, prosecutors had at their disposal “more than a hundred child witnesses as old as eleven and a truckload of medical reports bearing documentation of scarred genitals and anuses.”

The stories told by these children, it should be noted, were not fed to them by some diabolical team of therapists and headline-seeking journalists. Many of them were offered spontaneously to hundreds of parents and scores of childcare specialists. And the victims of the McMartin Preschool, all adults now, still tell the same stories today.

While anyone suggesting that the allegations in the McMartin case were true - and that a massive cover-up concealed the true nature and scope of the case - is likely to be labeled a 'conspiracy theorist,' the most preposterous conspiracy theory surrounding McMartin has always been the notion that some cabal of overzealous therapists was able to implant 'false memories' of heinous abuse in the minds of nearly 500 individuals, and have them persist to this day.

Despite the vast number of eyewitnesses - most of them bearing physical evidence of abuse - and despite the fact that the judge who presided over more than a year of pre-trial testimony ruled that the state had more than enough evidence to proceed to trial, District Attorney Ira Reiner inexplicably dropped all charges against five of the seven defendants in the case on January 17 of 1986. Six days before that, he had summarily dismissed two prosecutors on the case.

At least three dozen other suspects who had been independently identified by numerous witnesses were never indicted at all. One of these was a man named Robert Winkler, arrested in neighboring Torrance, California for running a baby-sitting service out of the Coco Palms Motel that authorities described as a front for a sexual abuse ring. Children in the McMartin case recognized Winkler in news footage as the man they had known as the 'Wolfman.'

The kids described Winkler as being a frequent visitor to the school, delivering drugs for use in abusive rituals, which were sometimes conducted in churches, a cemetery, or a crematorium. The Wolfman, conveniently enough, turned up dead on the eve of his trial, allegedly of a drug overdose.

Winkler wasn't the only one to miss his day in court in conjunction with the McMartin case. Judy Johnson, the first McMartin parent to lodge a complaint, turned up dead before her scheduled testimony as well. When her body was found sprawled naked on the floor of her home, her death was said to be due to complications from her chronic alcoholism. She was also derided by defense attorneys and their media allies as a mentally unfit crank.

In truth, Johnson was not known to have any mental problems - or a drinking problem - prior to learning of the unthinkable abuse her child had suffered. Considered a key prosecution witness, Johnson received frequent threats prior to her death and was followed when she ventured out in public. Many of the other McMartin parents were openly skeptical of Johnson’s stated cause of death.

A former Hermosa Beach police officer named Paul Bynum, who had been hired by the parents of victims as a private investigator, turned up dead on the eve of his scheduled testimony as well. His death by gunshot was ruled a suicide, though those close to Bynum dispute that finding to this day.

Among other things, Bynum may have testified about his examination of the tunnel excavation project conducted at the school site. This was, of course, the object of much derision by the media. The fact that the children repeatedly told stories of tunnels under the property by which they could be secretly transported to and from the school, and in which they were subjected to unspeakable abuse in a secret room, was frequently cited as ‘proof’ that the children's stories were fabrications.

It was universally accepted that the tunnels did not actually exist, that being the consensus view of the media and law enforcement authorities. But while it is true that the investigation commissioned by the District Attorney's office found no evidence of tunnels, one of the dirty little secrets of the McMartin case is that the tunnels did, in fact, exist.

Many of the parents were not satisfied with the ridiculously superficial examination by the DA’s office, and commissioned another investigation of the site when the property was sold in April of 1990. To lead the project, they hired E. Gary Stickel, Ph.D., a highly regarded archeologist recommended to them by the Chair of the Interdisciplinary Program of the Archeology Department at UCLA. Stickel had served as a consultant to Lucasfilms on the Indiana Jones movies.

Also brought on board were several other technical specialists. As Stickel wrote in his report on the excavation: “By engaging a highly recommended professional archeological team, [the parents] hoped to bring scientific authority to whatever might be found or a definitive resolution for whatever was not to be found.” And what the team found was precisely what the children had been telling them they would find for the previous seven years:

“The project unearthed not one but two tunnel complexes as well as previously unrecognized structural features which defied logical explanation. Both tunnel complexes conformed to locations and functional descriptions established by children's reports. One had been described as providing undetected access to an adjacent building on the east. The other provided outside access under the west wall of the building and contained within it an enlarged, cavernous artifact corresponding to children's descriptions of a ‘secret room.’

“Both the contour signature of the walls and the nature of recovered artifacts indicated that the tunnels had been dug by hand under the concrete slab floor after the construction of the building ... Not only did the discovered features fulfill the research prequalifications as tunnels designed for human traffic, there was also no alternative or natural explanation for the presence of such features ...

“If the stories of the children were bogus fantasies, there is no excuse for the tunnels discovered under the school. If there really were tunnels, there is no excuse for the glib dismissal of any and all of the complaints of the children and their parents.”

This investigation was completed before the McMartin trials had concluded, yet this devastating evidence was never presented in court by the prosecution. The existence of this report, complete with photos and maps of the tunnel complexes, was known to the local and national press, but it was never reported. To this day, it is denied that any tunnels ever existed under the McMartin Preschool.

The denial of the tunnels is necessary to maintain the illusion that the children were not credible witnesses, that illusion being essential to the cover-up. For if the children were credible, the implications run far deeper than the tunnels under the school. There is, for example, the stories told by the children of being pimped out as child prostitutes in private homes and businesses all over the community.

They also spoke frequently of being photographed and videotaped while being abused. District Attorney Robert Philibosian publicly declared the McMartin Preschool to be an elaborate front for a massive child pornography operation. Twenty-three parents filed a civil lawsuit making the very same claim, one that appears to be strongly supported by the facts of the case.

Other stories told repeatedly by the children are even more disturbing. They told of being forced to witness and participate in the ritual torture, killing and mutilation of animals and, on occasion, of human babies and children as well. They spoke of being forced to drink the blood and eat the flesh of the slaughtered corpses, of witnessing the beheading of infants, and of being forced to stab infants themselves.

They told as well of being sealed in coffins with the mutilated corpses. And they spoke of being subjected to every sort of depraved sexual activity imaginable, including necrophilia, copraphilia and bestiality. The abuse was of such stunning brutality that it is almost beyond human comprehension that anyone could inflict such physical and psychological torture on children.

And yet these stories were soon being told by thousands of other kids across the country as preschool abuse cases spread like wildfire. Young children from all walks of life, and from all parts of the country, all telling remarkably similar stories of horrific ritual abuse – how was this possible? If they were all victims of 'false memories,' how vast a conspiracy would be required for therapists all across the country to implant the very same memories in all of these children?

Experts have noted that the victimized children show a level of knowledge that defies rational explanation if the kids have not experienced what they claim to have experienced. For instance, these child victims can accurately describe the look, smell, texture and colors of human viscera. This is an ability, it has been argued, that very few adults possess, other than those who have been trained as surgeons or coroners.

These children also display a remarkable level of knowledge of a wide variety of human sexual practices, including many bizarre acts that, again, most adults do not have knowledge or awareness of. If these children did not experience these things firsthand, then how did they gain such knowledge?

In February of 1985, Officer Sandi Gallant of the San Francisco Police Department submitted a report to her superiors noting the similarities in numerous ritual abuse cases. She had gathered evidence from fellow officers and police departments across the country and summarized the evidence referenced in the police reports submitted to her. An excerpt from her report reads as follows:

“The information contained herein is distasteful and bizarre, to such a degree that one would choose to discredit it. However, research that I have done in this area has revealed that numerous cases of this type are surfacing around the country and in Canada. The similarities in the stories of each child victim used in these crimes tend to give credibility to the information revealed by others. Additionally, the psychiatrists and therapists who have been treating the victims state that the consistency of the stories and the explicit details revealed cause them to believe that these children are telling the truth. It is also the belief of each law enforcement officer who submitted information for this report that the victims are being truthful and that, in fact, children would be unable to make such stories up.

“During my research, similarities began surfacing which indicate the strong probability that there exists a network of people in this country involved in the sexual abuse and possible homicides of young children. These cases appear to differ from isolated cases of abuse towards children in that the crimes mentioned here have been committed with one common goal in mind – that of mutilating and murdering children for ritualistic or sacrificial purposes. Many of the cases reported also reveal the possibility of child pornography beyond the normal type of ‘kiddie porn’ in that these children are photographed during rituals with some members in robes or other garb and candles, snakes, swords, altars and other types of ritualistic material being used.”

Gallant had requested that the report be sent on to the chief of police for him to review and forward to the FBI. Following his review, however, the chief declined to submit the report. Gallant also tried to get the U.S. Department of Justice to review the paperwork, but she was - not surprisingly - rebuffed there as well.

As for the McMartin case, there has never been any question that the children there were horrifically abused. Though rarely noted in press reports, the jurors were clearly of the opinion that that was, in fact, the case. The hung juries and acquittals were the result of the jury members’ inability to identify the perpetrators of that abuse, which they attributed to the inept presentation of the prosecution’s case.

Another notable fact about the McMartin trials is that the defense was allowed to subject the child witnesses to the longest pretrial hearing in the nation’s history. Facing a battery of as many as seven rabid defense attorneys, the already severely traumatized children were verbally assaulted for weeks on end in a deliberate attempt to break them. The state made little effort to protect these young victims.

Also rarely noted in the reporting on the trials is that the matriarch of the family - Virginia McMartin - admitted on the stand that one of her own granddaughters believed that her children had been molested at the school. McMartin, by the way, had achieved semi-celebrity status in the childcare field. In the mid-1960s, she had traveled to New Zealand, Australia, Denmark, Sweden, Norway and England to visit preschools as a consultant.

In the final analysis, the logical conclusion to be drawn from the McMartin case is that 460 kids did not conspire to all lie about the abuse they suffered. They also did not likely lie about their involvement in child prostitution and child pornography. They certainly did not lie about the tunnels under the school.

They also did not lie about their forced involvement in satanic rituals, in which adults sheathed in black ceremonial robes uttered chants. In fact, at least one such robe was seized from the home of a defendant. And, perhaps most tragically, there is good reason to believe that they did not lie about the blood sacrifices either.



REFERENCES:

1. Constantine, Alex Virtual Government, Feral House, 1997
2. Hollingsworth, Jan Unspeakable Acts, Congdon & Weed, 1986
3. Kahaner, Larry Cults That Kill, Warner Books, 1989
4. Newton, Michael Raising Hell, Avon Books, 1993
5. Raschke, Carl Painted Black, Harper and Row, 1990
6. Ryder, Daniel Cover-Up of the Century, Ryder Publishing, 1996
7. Stanton, Mike “U-Turn on Memory Lane,” Columbia Journalism Review, July/August 1997
8. Stickel, E. Gary, Ph.D. “Archaeological Investigations of the McMartin Preschool Site, Manhattan Beach, California” (unpublished report of investigation)
9. Summit, Dr. Roland C. “The Dark Tunnels of McMartin,” Journal of Psychohistory, Spring 1994
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Old July 21st, 2012 #17
Steven L. Akins
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Oooh - I think I remember something about the UK cases. I remember a certain social work department (might have been London) having a higher than usual amount of abuse cases, both Satanic and ordinary and they were all called into doubt when one kid they'd whipped out of its home for severe bruises on the legs turned out to have nothing more than marker pen smudges from the name written in its wellies. It all blew up from there.

This is what bugs me with psychs and so on - we don't understand half and a quarter of what goes on in the mind and so much damage can be done by messing about with it. It's the same with 'Nam syndrome". We're always hearing here about how many Americans are convinced they went to Vietnam and saw and experienced various horrors yet on investigation they never even went. Yet I do believe they seriously think they went.
The same thing goes on in regard to Woodstock.
 
Old July 21st, 2012 #18
Alex Linder
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Yes, it was one of the theories the defence were exploring. There were some strange satanic paintings on some kind of dump walls near the Bay and in East La Loma Park, where she was supposed to be walking Mackenzie on the morning she disappeared, there were a few transients who were said to be devil worshippers.

There was also some kind of street art made out of the feet of shop dummies and of course Laci's feet were missing; whether this was due to the elements is not known.

There was also a van with "satanic symbols" seen in the area - this was seen on the Xmas Eve by the wife of a council man who lived opposite Laci.

Modesto has had quite a few missing women. Chandra Levy who was alleged to be pregnant by some congress man called Condit, there was another pregnant Mexican woman who disappeared from the hotel where she worked as a chambermaid, and I believe the people who set up the Carole Sund/Carrington foundation had some connection with the area as well. This was one of the things that the defence threw out to try and exonerate Scott.
You ever hear of the McMartin preschool case?
 
Old July 21st, 2012 #19
Alex Linder
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I always laugh whenever police give any serious consideration to there being any sort of organized "devil-worship" cult. Most of what they think of as "devil-worshipers" are nothing more than teenagers who do things like spray-paint graffitti pentagrams or "666" on things to freak people out because they think people will get freaked out if they find a pentagram or "666" spraypainted on something - and sometimes they do; but that is about the extent of it.
That's because such a large percentage of our nation is low-rent christians looking for signs. They are encouraged in this lunacy by corrupt intellectuals selling books.

It's the dumbest among us who need logical reasoning the most. The very last thing these congenital botches need is faith.
 
Old July 21st, 2012 #20
Alex Linder
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Oopss....Mike Todd and I are thinking along same lines, I hadn't seen his post when I posted.

Put children in a room with psychiatrists, and they'll badger the little buggers into saying whatever needs to be said.
 
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