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Old February 25th, 2007 #41
Alex Linder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironguard1940 View Post
Well, by looking at the posts on this thread, I have come to the conclusion that Alex Linder favors homeschooling. I 100% concur, and if there is any way possible I am going to try to homeschool my kids. Public schools are worse than a sick joke; they are dangerous hellholes for White kids, even in mostly White areas. White Solidarity. :box:
Just find it a very interesting subject. I post here various opinions re public schooling and homeschooling. If people understand the history and origins of public schooling, they'll see why it endangers children.
 
Old March 4th, 2007 #42
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Default 2007 German horror tale

2007 German horror tale
http://www.washingtontimes.com/op-ed...4730-5162r.htm

Earlier this month, a German teen-ager was forcibly taken from her parents and imprisoned in a psychiatric ward. Her crime? She is being home-schooled.

On Feb. 1, 15 German police officers forced their way into the home of the Busekros family in the Bavarian town of Erlangen. They hauled off 16-year-old Melissa, the eldest of the six Busekros children, to a psychiatric ward in nearby Nuremberg. Last week, a court affirmed that Melissa has to remain in the Child Psychiatry Unit because she is suffering from "school phobia."

Home-schooling has been illegal in Germany since Adolf Hitler outlawed it in 1938 and ordered all children to be sent to state schools. The home-schooling community in Germany is tiny. As Hitler knew, Germans tend to obey orders unquestioningly. Only some 500 children are being home-schooled in a country of 80 million. Home-schooling families are prosecuted without mercy.

Last March, a judge in Hamburg sentenced a home-schooling father of six to a week in prison and a fine of $2,000. Last September, a Paderborn mother of 12 was locked up in jail for two weeks. The family belongs to a group of seven ethnic German families who immigrated to Paderborn from the former Soviet Union. The Soviets persecuted them because they were Baptists. An initiative of the Paderborn Baptists to establish their own private school was rejected by the German authorities. A court ruled that the Baptists showed "a stubborn contempt both for the state's educational duty as well as the right of their children to develop their personalities by attending school."

All German political parties, including the Christian Democrats of Chancellor Angela Merkel, are opposed to home-schooling. They say that "the obligation to attend school is a civil obligation, that cannot be tampered with." The home-schoolers receive no support from the official (state funded) churches, either. These maintain that home-schoolers "isolate themselves from the world" and that "freedom of religion does not justify opposition against the obligation to attend school." Six decades after Hitler, German politicians and church leaders still do not understand true freedom: that raising children is a prerogative of their fathers and mothers and not of the state, which is never a benevolent parent and often an enemy.

Hermann Stucher, a pedagogue who called upon Christians to withdraw their children from the state schools which, he says, have fallen into the hands of "neo-Marxist activists," has been threatened with prosecution for "Hochverrat und Volksverhetzung" (high treason and incitement of the people against the authorities). The fierceness of the authorities' reaction is telling. The dispute is about the hearts and minds of the children. In Germany, schools have become vehicles of indoctrination, where children are brought up to unquestioningly accept the authority of the state in all areas of life. It is no coincidence that people who have escaped Soviet indoctrination discern what the government is doing in the schools and are sufficiently concerned to want to protect their children from it.

What is worrying is that most "free-born" Germans accept this assault on their freedom as normal and eye parents who opt out of the state system with suspicion.

The situation is hardly better at the European level. Last September, the European Court of Human Rights supported Hitler's 1938 schooling bill. The Strasburg-based court, whose verdicts apply in the entire European Union, ruled that the right to education "by its very nature calls for regulation by the State." It upheld the finding of German courts: "Schools represent society, and it is in the children's interest to become part of that society. The parents' right to educate does not go so far as to deprive their children of that experience."

While it is disquieting that Europeans have not learned the lessons from their dictatorial past — upholding Nazi laws and sending dissidents, including children, to psychiatric wards, as the Soviets used to do — there is reason for Americans to worry, too. The United Nations is also restricting the rights of parents. Article 29 of the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child stipulates that it is the goal of the state to direct the education of children. In Belgium, the U.N. Convention is currently being used to limit the constitutional right to home-school. In 1995 Britain was told that it violated the U.N. Convention by allowing parents to remove their children from public school sex-education classes.

Last year, the American Home School Legal Defense Association warned that the U.N. Convention could make home-schooling illegal in America, even though the Senate has never ratified it. Some lawyers and liberal politicians in the states claim that U.N. conventions are "customary international law" and should be considered part of American jurisprudence.

At present, young Melissa Busekros' ordeal is a German horror story. Could it soon be an American one?

Not so Free in Germany
http://www.winnipegsun.com/News/Colu...3/3690101.html

I will forgo the pleasure of drinking German lager and eating sauerkraut for the foreseeable future and I ask freedom lovers to consider joining me.

I am joining an international boycott of German goods because of that country's drift away from fundamental freedoms.

We in North America do not hear much much about Germany, as our media focuses on exotic hotspots, but I have noticed a discernible trend suggesting people should pay attention to the loss of freedoms in so-called advanced Western democracies, like Germany.

The most ominous example is the Busekros family. An online petition is calling for a boycott of German products due to their treatment.

The horrendous crime of this family, and others across Germany, is they chose to homeschool their children, a right taken for granted here. Homeschooling is illegal there, and authorities seem out for blood.

It took 15 German officers to take 15-year-old Melissa Busekros from her home, as the German government began cracking down on these nasty enemies of the state. By court order, school officials ordered the breakup of a family with five children, after the state asserted its belief that Christian homeschooling is a "parallel culture" that Germany can do without.

One child was even placed in a psychiatric ward and her parents denied the location.

Homeschooling parents in Germany have been imprisoned for teaching their children in a Christian lifestyle. The Home School Legal Defense Association estimates there are 40 other ongoing cases in Germany against homeschoolers.

Homeschoolers do not get much attention because they are a minority, but it is this minority that needs the most protection from a majority willing to deny their rights.

The essence of a free state is the existence of pluralistic civil society where different choices are permitted. The German authorities apparently do not respect the convictions of religious communities which believe family ought to be the first teacher, not the omnipotent state. My parents considered homeschooling me out of concerns over the expunging of Christianity from public schools. I'm glad we did not live in Germany.

What is frightening is that the law forbidding homeschooling was adopted during the Nazi era on the grounds that the state needed to take control over every aspect of life.

One German homeschool advocate said, "We are not far away from an intolerant dictatorship. Parental rights are more and more abolished. If you do not educate the way the state wants, the so-called Judenamt (youth welfare office) is quick to check out if they can take away the custody of your children."

If this was the only troubling sign from Germany, I would stop, but it is not. This attack on homeschooling comes on the heels of the conviction of Holocaust revisionist Ernst Zundel, who was sentenced to five years in prison for "denying the Holocaust," which is considered seditious in Germany.

Call me a fool, but ideas and thoughts should be challenged in the forum of open debate, not through criminal sanction. The Holocaust is one of the most documented events in history, so there is a reason Zundel is marginalized. Freedom is nothing if it does not protect the most vulnerable and reviled.

As for me, I will be throwing out my Kinder Surprise eggs and asking the German Embassy to help stop the harassment of German families.

Last edited by William Robert; March 4th, 2007 at 08:57 PM.
 
Old March 5th, 2007 #43
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I am confused about the 2nd article, from winnipegsun.com. I can't pull up the original article on my weak little computer - does it really include mention of Ernst Z. or is that your "editorial plant"? No way would anything but the most fulminating, foaming hatred of EZ be allowed to see the light of day in an Absurdistanian newspaper. I am sure of that.

On the other hand, I do know that the Sun chain of newspapers in Canada sometimes rock the boat a wee bit.
 
Old March 9th, 2007 #44
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It says exactly that, and the link does work.
 
Old March 9th, 2007 #46
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Default Faggots want to force faggotry on homeschooled children

Canadian Gays Urge More Government Control Of Private And Home Schools Over 'Homophobia'
http://www.narth.com/docs/morecontrol.html

March 7, 2007 - Gay activist groups in Ontario are urging the provincial ministry of education to exert more control over private and home schools to fight against the alleged effects of homophobia.

LifesiteNews.com reports on an article in Ottawa's Capital Xtra that objects to religious schools teaching "only their own values."

The article by Tony Lovink claims that "All private schools tend to be at least implicitly homophobic. And I would say all religiously formed independent schools are definitely homophobia. Lovink describes himself as a gay Christian school teacher.

The Coalition for Lesbian and Gay Rights in Ontario says it is concerned that the provincial ministry of education was failing to exert "more control" over the curriculum used by private religious schools. The coalition also objects to private schools hiring teachers based upon the school's own qualification requirements.

In October 2006, the Quebec government ordered private Christian schools to begin teaching sex education and Darwinism in compliance with the provincial curriculum. Schools failing to implement these materials were threatened with closure.


Faggots want to force faggotry on homeschooled children


In British Columbia, gay activists Murray Corren and Peter Corren were granted power over the provincial school curriculum as part of a lawsuit settlement. The settlement also introduced a policy prohibiting parents from removing their children from the classroom when gay-affirmative materials were being taught.


Related articles

British Columbia Parents and Teachers for Life
http://www.bcptl.org/


Homosexual Activists Consider Targeting Private Christian Schools for "Homophobia"
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1792251/posts

(excerpt)
OTTAWA, Ontario, February 27, 2007 (LifeSiteNews.com) - Ontario private schools are coming increasingly under the lens of homosexual activist groups for "homophobic" teaching stemming from the schools' primarily religious foundations, a report in Ottawa's homosexual news media indicated earlier this week.

In an article warning about the increasing trend toward private and religious schools in the province, Ottawa's Capital Xtra objected to religious schools that teach children "only their own values."

Last edited by William Robert; March 9th, 2007 at 11:34 PM.
 
Old March 10th, 2007 #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
It says exactly that, and the link does work.
Schoenen dank, A.L. & B. Bob (for your P.M.) regarding the article in the Winnipeg Sun. Ho-lee smoke is all I can say. I think heads will roll over there for the simple reference to EZ.
 
Old August 13th, 2007 #48
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Latest from HSLDA...

Homeschoolers Lobby Congress as Part of Congressional Action Program

By Will Estrada



Sandy and Lewis Toms and their four children meet with Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah. Nearly 50 homeschoolers with HSLDA’s CAP program went to Washington in June to lobby their congressmen.



On Monday, June 25, 49 homeschool parents and children from four states joined staff from HSLDA’s Federal Relations department in Washington, D.C., for the Congressional Action Program’s CAP Lobbying Day on the Hill.

Homeschooling families from Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland and West Virginia were briefed on current homeschool issues by HSLDA President Mike Smith, Director of Federal Relations Will Estrada, and former CAP participant Elizabeth Smith. Families then heard from staffers from the offices of Representative Buck McKeon (CA-25), Representative Pete Hoekstra (MI-2), and House Minority Leader John Boehner (OH-8).

After the briefing, the families headed out for their previously scheduled visits with staffers and congressmen on the House and Senate education committees.

“When we were walking to the buildings, I was kind of nervous,” recalled Andrew Toms, age 12. “Then, once we sat down with the staff people, I was kind of excited.” His parents, Sandy and Lewis Toms, enthusiastically added, “God opens doors!” The Toms family and their four children were able to meet with Representative Frank Wolf (VA-10) and Senator Orrin Hatch (Utah).

Julie Randall, her married daughter Rachel Estrada, and the homeschooling daughter of a friend, Johannah McWilliams, also saw firsthand how doors were opened to them. As they stopped by the office of Representative Danny Davis (IL-7), a Democrat from Illinois, the congressman saw them talking to the receptionist and came out to meet them. He asked them to come into his office and put another meeting on hold as he looked over their materials and talked to them about homeschooling.



From left, Rachel Estrada, Johanna McWilliams and Julie Randall meet with Representative Danny Davis of Illinois. The Congressman put a meeting on hold to discuss homeschooling issues with the CAP lobbyists.

“Representative Danny Davis was a very kind man,” said Julie Randall. “It was an awesome experience for Johanna McWilliams, my friend’s 11-year-old daughter, to actually get to meet Representative Davis on her first CAP lobbying day and sit and talk with him in his office and to hear Representative Davis say that he wants to be a ‘champion’ of homeschoolers.”

One of the powerful benefits of the CAP program is that homeschool families are able to share how laws and policies directly affect their families. For example, Doug and Kim Kincell from West Virginia came to the CAP lobbying day straight from a vacation with their three daughters, Kiri, Keely, and Kelsi. They met with a staffer from the office of Senator Robert Byrd (West Virginia)’s office to discuss amending federal law to open up the Byrd scholarship for homeschoolers. Since the Kincell daughters are college age, the staffer could see firsthand how this law discriminates against them. The Senate soon after passed the Higher Education Act reauthorization and included language which would make homeschooled students eligible for the Byrd scholarship, something which has been a high priority for HSLDA for several years.

HSLDA applauds the work of our CAP families and is actively planning additional CAP events. CAP families have achieved great success in the past and continue to achieve great success today as they lobby Congress to protect homeschooling liberty.

http://www.hslda.org/docs/news/200708090.asp
 
Old February 12th, 2008 #50
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Homeschool Family Faces $7,000 Fine

In January and February of 2007, the El Paso School District contacted the McIntyre family twice about their homeschooling their seven children.

HSLDA Senior Counsel Chris Klicka wrote twice to the school district, indicating that the family was in compliance with Texas law as set forth in the Leeper case. This case declared that in the state of Texas homeschools are private schools. Nonetheless, the El Paso School District went forward and brought criminal charges against the family for “failing to meet homeschool verification requirements.” They also brought multiple truancy charges against the family for the various children.

HSLDA Texas counsel Tom Sanders had several conference calls with the prosecutor over the next several months. The prosecutor told Sanders that he would drop the charges if he could just get an official letter to verify that the family was homeschooling. Sanders argued Klicka had already written the school district such a letter on their behalf. Finally, in September of 2007, the prosecutor agreed to dismiss the case. On the charges, he personally wrote “no convictions” and commented that he would have pursued the case, except “his star witness would not testify!”

However, in October 2007, the family received a letter from an attorney who worked for the county to collect fines. In the attorney’s letter to the McIntyres, he said “our law firm has been hired to represent El Paso County in the collection and disposition of the above listed matter.” He went on to warn that the family they had 10 days to pay the fines that had been levied against four of the seven children. The fines totaled over $7,000.

After many attempts to contact the attorney in charge of collecting fines, Tom Sanders wrote a letter explaining that the case was dismissed.

After contacting the prosecuting attorney again, a formal “motion to dismiss” was filed and signed by the assistant district attorney. It was then signed by the judge dismissing the case—in November of 2007 after 10 months!

We praise God for this victory. The McIntyres continue to homeschool—only now without being harassed.

http://www.hslda.org/hs/state/tx/200802121.asp
 
Old February 13th, 2008 #51
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Get out of public schools, campaign warns

'Students to endure gender-bending education unless parents rescue them'

February 12, 2008

If you care about your children, homeschool, find a Christian school, participate in a homeschool coop, pay the tuition, drive an older car, whatever is necessary to keep them out of California's public school system. That's the message from a new campaign, assembled under the Rescue Your Child slogan.

And it's all because the California Legislature and Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger worked together to establish Senate Bill 777 and Assembly Bill 394 as law, plans that institutionalize the promotion of homosexuality, bisexuality, transgenderism and other alternative lifestyle choices.

"First, [California] law allowed public schools to voluntarily promote homosexuality, bisexuality, and transsexuality. Then, the law required public schools to accept homosexual, bisexual, and transsexual teachers as role models for impressionable children. Now, the law has been changed to effectively require the positive portrayal of homosexuality, bisexuality, and transsexuality to six million children in California government-controlled schools," said Randy Thomasson, chief of the Campaign for Children and Families and a leader in the movement to withdraw what supporters pray will be up to 600,000 children from public districts in the state.

At a Los Angeles news conference, Thomasson's organization kicked off the statewide drive for exodus. The new website provides information to parents on just what they have to do, and how to do it, in protect their children from the "gay" agenda now standardized throughout the state.

Officials said SB 777 "functionally requires public school instructional materials and school-sponsored activities to positively portray cross-dressing, sex-change operations, homosexual 'marriages,' and all aspects of homosexuality and bisexuality, including so-called 'gay history.'"

The second bill, AB 394, "requires public schools to distribute controversial material to teachers, students, and parents which promotes transsexuality, bisexuality, and homosexuality, all under the guise of 'anti-harassment' training," the group said.

"Why are parents concerned? What will the implementation look like?" Thomasson asked. "Imagine a teacher saying, 'Class, for our contemporary social studies non-discrimination bias component, we have a special speaker today. He will share his amazing story of growing up as a male trapped in a woman's body.' This is the type of gender-bending education which students may have to endure unless their parents rescue them from the increasingly negative public school environment."

Even insiders joined in the call for an abandonment of California's public districts. Veteran public school teacher Nadine Williams of Torrance said the sexual indoctrination laws have motivated her to keep her grandchildren out of the very public schools she used to support.

"SB 777 and AB 394 became law on Jan. 1," said Thomasson, "but laws usually take some time to get through the whole system. We expect that every public school in California will have these sexual indoctrination laws in force within the next year to two years. Parents can't be in denial. Parents can't say, 'If I don't see it, it's not there.' It's there,'" he said.

"And the parents are beginning to see it. They've got to rescue their child from sexual indoctrination. There is a solution – private school, homeschool, church school," he said.

Caron Strong, a single mother from Los Angeles, said her daughter now will be homeschooled.

"It's a commitment to my child that regardless of the circumstances, I can't back away from," she said. "I have to make this work. ... I will make this work for the sake of my child."

Parents Anthony and Yvette Whitcher of Los Alamitos and Marty Gobel of Laguna Hills said they are looking into turn-key curriculum programs such as Alpha Omega Publications, CLASS and Bob Jones University Press.

"The CLASS homeschooling program's most expensive tuition for a high-school level, full-service plan, where we do the grading, provide report cards, transfers, and all of that, works out to about $60 a month for a nine-month school year, about $550," said Mark Beuligmann, administrative director for CLASS. "That's not $10,000. And people do this with us all the time."

"For those parents who are not able to homeschool, most private Christian schools have financial aid available to help parents out," said David Baker, a former public school district principal and administrator and now chief of Capistrano Valley Christian schools. "Parents often have to prioritize what are the most important things in their lives. Parents would give up purchasing new cars or going on expensive vacations. So their children come first in their lives. It is possible to homeschool or enter into a relationship witih a Christian school."

"Our school, NAUMS, a blend of traditional school and also homeschool, is at least half the cost of a traditional private school," said Joseph Rispoli, a former teacher who runs National University-Model School in Tustin. "So there are other alternatives."

"We help churches plant homeschool cooperatives," said Heidi St. John, of First Class Homeschool Ministries. "We have a proven program that any church can put into their ministry. Parents come one day a week and offer classes to the children, therefore building a community of homeschoolers."

California parents, Thomasson said, already are becoming aware of the dangers their children face.

"They're calling and asking how they can homeschool. They're calling private schools, they're calling church schools. They're getting ready to exist the dysfunctional, sexually indoctrinating public school system."

WND reported earlier leaders of the campaign called California Exodus say they hope to encourage parents of 600,000 children to withdraw them from the public districts this year.

The new law itself technically bans in any school texts, events, class or activities any discriminatory bias against those who have chosen alternative sexual lifestyles, Meredith Turney, legislative liaison for Capitol Resource Institute, said.

There are no similar protections for students with traditional or conservative lifestyles and beliefs, however. Offenders will face the wrath of the state Department of Education, up to and including lawsuits.

"SB 777 will result in reverse discrimination against students with religious and traditional family values. These students have lost their voice as the direct result of Gov. Schwarzenegger's unbelievable decision. The terms 'mom and dad' or 'husband and wife' could promote discrimination against homosexuals if a same-sex couple is not also featured," she said.

Karen England, chief of CRI, told WND that the law is not a list of banned words, including "mom" and "dad." But she said the requirement is that the law bans discriminatory bias and the effect will be to ban such terminology.

"Having 'mom' and 'dad' promotes a discriminatory bias. You have to either get rid of 'mom' and 'dad' or include everything when talking about [parental issues]," she said. "They [promoters of sexual alternative lifestyles] do consider that discriminatory."

The California plan still is facing a court challenge on its constitutionality and a possible vote of the people of California if an initiative effort succeeds.

http://worldnetdaily.com/index.php?f...w&pageId=56264
 
Old February 13th, 2008 #52
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Family Accused of Having ‘Too Many Kids’


The Smith family (name changed to protect privacy) was contacted by an Austin social services worker who stopped by the house. When Mrs. Smith answered the door the social worker demanded to enter the home and to talk with the children. Instead of allowing her entrance, Mrs. Smith contacted HSLDA.

One accusation against the family was that they had “too many children.” They were also accused of requiring their children to “do the dishes” and of taking their frustrations out on the older children. The Smiths have seven children, with two adopted through foster care. In response, the family gave 25 letters of reference, a statement from their doctor, and a copy of the home study they had done to become foster parents.

Senior Counsel Chris Klicka contacted the social worker and explained the family's Fourth Amendment rights and explained how ridiculous the allegations were. Finally, the family received a call from the social worker that the case was closed because the accusations against the family were false.

HSLDA Social Services Contact Policy

We desire to advise our members in every contact with a social worker and/or police officer in investigations resulting from allegations of abuse or neglect. If homeschooling is an issue, we will represent our member families until the issue is resolved. On Fourth Amendment unreasonable search and seizure issues, HSLDA will advise our members whenever the privacy of their home is violated by forced or coerced entry for the purpose of an unsubstantiated investigation. HSLDA membership benefits do not extend to court actions resulting from non-homeschooling matters. However, in circumstances where there is a clear violation of the Fourth Amendment, HSLDA may, as we have done in the past, choose to take the case in an effort to establish legal precedent.

http://www.hslda.org/hs/state/tx/200802120.asp
 
Old February 13th, 2008 #53
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Exodus Mandate, Phyllis Schlafly and a Coalition of Christian and Pro-family Organizations Endorse Call for 'Exodus' From California Schools

Exodus Mandate, Eagle Forum, and California-Based K-12 Christian Education and Pro-Family Organizations Join the Campaign for Children and Families' Call for Parents To Remove Their Children From California's Public Schools

Contact: E. Ray Moore, Jr., Chaplain (Lt. Col.) USAR Ret, Director of Exodus Mandate or Dr. Bruce Shortt, 803-714-1744. California Exodus contacts: www.Californiaexodus.org, [email protected]

COLUMBIA, South Carolina, Feb. 7 /Christian Newswire/ -- California Governor Schwarzenegger signed legislation mandating that public school children be indoctrinated to accept as normal the homosexual lifestyle and other forms of sexual deviancy. In the wake of the failed effort to obtain a referendum to repeal this legislation, a broad coalition of Christian grassroots organizations have endorsed the Campaign for Children and Families' call for California families and churches to rescue their children from California's public schools.

The growing coalition includes Eagle Forum, the Campaign for Children and Families, Exodus Mandate, and ten more sponsors, five of which are based in California. These organizations will be providing information to California parents and pastors concerning the new school legislation, how it mainstream's sexual deviancy among children, and what alternatives to California's public schools are available.

According to Phyllis Schlafly, President of Eagle Forum, "Many of us have worked to reform public schools. Unfortunately, SB 777 and the related legislation represent a repudiation of 2,000 years of Christian moral teaching on human sexuality, marriage, and the family. The result is that California's schools are now promoting behaviors and lifestyles that are physically and spiritually dangerous for children. Consequently, in California, parents must try to find alternatives to the public schools."

Chairman for California Exodus is Dr. Ron Gleason, theologian and pastor of Grace Presbyterian Church, Yorba Linda, California and stated clerk of the South Coast Presbytery of the Presbyterian Church in America. In accepting this assignment he said: "As a parent and grandparent, I want those near and dear to me to have quality education. This country excels in every social, economical, scientific, and political category known to man, but gets low grades on the education of its children. We should be leading the world in developing well-educated young people. This role is first and foremost the responsibility of parents."

One California-based sponsor, Denise Kanter, Founder of Considering Homeschooling Ministry said, "We hope our ministry with its free resources and web site will encourage families to provide their children with a safe Biblical home education." Dr. Robert Simonds, President of Citizens for Excellence in Education, also a California organization, added, "Now is the time for the pastors and churches to fulfill their role in rescuing their own children and helping society by providing K-12 Christian education too."

Randy Thomasson of the California-based Campaign for Children and Families has witnessed the attack on parental rights and sexual indoctrination of children coming over the last several years, "First, the law allowed public schools to voluntarily promote homosexuality, bisexuality, and transsexuality. Then, the law required public schools to accept homosexual, bisexual, and transsexual teachers as role models for impressionable children. Now, the law has been changed to effectively require the positive portrayal of homosexuality, bisexuality, and transsexuality to six million children in California government-controlled schools. To rescue their children, loving parents need to find an alternative to government schools, and every church needs to make it a priority to help parents be in charge of their children's education again."

E. Ray Moore, Jr., believes that it is urgent that the coalition make parents and pastors aware of how dangerous the new legislation is going to make public schools and that they must take up their God-given responsibilities with their children. In fact, according to Moore, "The Biblical and theological case for Christian families and churches to practice K-12 Christian schooling or home schooling is strong. Christians should begin with the belief that children belong to the Lord and are a stewardship of the family, not the state."

Bruce Shortt, author of The Harsh Truth About Public Schools, notes, "Christians have already become numb to the moral relativism that is taught in all public schools today. Now children will be told that their sexual orientation and gender are relative, too. No longer will children raised in these schools understand that God made us male and female with different, but complementary roles. Instead, children will be taught that sexual orientation and gender are merely a matter of personal choice. Thus, children will be told that because there are many sexual orientations and gender identities, they simply have to reach their own conclusions about which sexual orientation and gender 'possibilities' are 'right for them.' Along with this will come the message that you really can't tell whether you like something unless you have tried it. The likely consequences of this for children, the institution of the family, our churches, and our culture are horrendous."

Additional information can be found at, www.californiaexodus.org, www.savecalifornia.com, and www.exodusmandate.org.

List of sponsoring organizations: Phyllis Schlafly with Eagle Forum; Denise Kanter with Considering Homeschooling Ministry; Dr. Robert Simonds with Citizens for Excellence in Education; Star Parker with Coalition on Urban Renewal & Education; Patch Blakey with Association of Classical and Christian Schools; Dave and Kim d’Escoto with Dexios; Dan Smithwick with Nehemiah Institute; Alan Schaeffer with Alliance for Separation of School and State; Linda Harvey with Mission America; Randy Thomasson with Campaign for Children and families; and Dr. Ron Gleason with California Exodus.

http://www.earnedmedia.org/exmd0207.htm
 
Old February 15th, 2008 #55
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On March 28, 2002, Focus on the Family founder, James C. Dobson, PhD, stated on his daily radio broadcast: "In the state of California, if I had a child there, I wouldn't put the youngster in a public school.... I think it's time to get our kids out. And I'm going to get hit for [saying] that."

In a statement to supporters, Marshall Fritz, President of the Alliance for the Separation of School & State, said: "For years, Dr. Dobson has supported three options for Christians: Public schools, Christian schools, and home schooling. With today's courageous and insightful statement, Dr. Dobson joins the millions of Americans who have already discovered that the public schools have become government indoctrination centers which are no place to train new generations of freedom loving Americans."

Dr. Dobson's statement may mark a key turning point in the critical education discussion. His broadcast is heard by 200 million people daily in over 100 countries.

Two movements that have been at the fore of the education discussion are: Exodus Mandate (http://www.exodusmandate.org), founded by Rev. E. Raymond Moore; and Alliance for the Separation of School & State (http://www.sepschool.org), founded by Marshall Fritz.

Many other Christian leaders have expressed concern that public schools are too dangerous for Christians, notably Dr. D. James Kennedy of Coral Ridge Ministries and T.C. Pinckney, recently elected Second Vice President of the Southern Baptist Convention.

General Pinckney's address to the leaders of the convention, titled "We Are Losing Our Children," is considered by both Moore and Fritz to be the clearest exposition of the situation of Christians in today's American public schools. You can see the transcript at http://sepschool.org/SIG/losing.html.

Approximately 15,000, including Bill and Mary Pride of Homeschool World, have signed a Public Proclamation for the Separation of School and State. The Proclamation goes even further than does Dr. Dobson--it calls for the end of government involvement in education. Scores of religious leaders have endorsed the Proclamation, ranging from Dr. D. James Kennedy and Dr. Tim LaHaye to Fr. John A. Hardon, S.J., and from Rabbi Daniel Lapin to Iman Hamza Yusef Hanson. Others can be seen at:

Protestant: http://sepschool.org/VIPList.html#protestant
Catholic: http://sepschool.org/VIPList.html#catholic
LDS: http://sepschool.org/VIPList.html#lds
Jewish: http://sepschool.org/VIPList.html#jewish
Muslim: http://sepschool.org/VIPList.html#muslim
 
Old February 15th, 2008 #56
Alex Linder
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Above discussed in Radio Istina (February 14, 2008)

http://broadcasting.vanguardnewsnetw...na20080214.mp3
 
Old February 25th, 2008 #57
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Political Resistance Continues

[February 2008]


by J. Michael Smith
HSLDA President

Do you believe America always will be safe for homeschooling? Most people might be tempted to say yes, but the reality could be different.

We should remember that after the advent of compulsory education, it was only during the past 25 years that America formally recognized homeschooling in all 50 states. To illustrate how far we have come, as recently as 1983, seven fathers in Nebraska were jailed for their decision to homeschool their children.

Also in 1983, homeschooling was effectively illegal in 45 states because those states mandated that parents must have four-year teaching certificates before they could teach their own children.

In the early ’80s, it was clear there was a need for homeschoolers to come together and fight for their fundamental right to raise their own children without government-imposed mandates.

The Home School Legal Defense Association is approaching its 25th anniversary. Today, homeschooling is thriving throughout the country and is acknowledged widely as an educational success story. Homeschooling, however, increasingly is being challenged in state legislatures across the country.

Every year, particularly between January and May, when many state legislatures conduct most of their activity, HSLDA’s legal department works long hours tracking legislation across all 50 states.

This year, we have seen a significant spike in the number of anti-home-school bills. The fight to maintain homeschool freedom is far from over.

One of the most anti-homeschooling bills came from Nebraska. Partly because of Nebraska’s history, the legislation introduced by state Sen. DiAnna Schimek was particularly troubling.

It called for numerous state-administered tests and the approval of homeschools by the Nebraska Department of Education. If passed, it effectively would have banned homeschooling in Nebraska and could have led to parents being jailed again.

It seemed Nebraska was on the road to repeating its past mistakes. Fortunately, Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman announced that he would veto the legislation if it ever reached his desk. HSLDA is thankful that the governor stepped forward, but Miss Schimek’s action is a vivid reminder that the fight to maintain our freedom is an ongoing battle.

Several other states have introduced bills that in one way or another would increase the bureaucratic burden on homeschooling families. In particular, Tennessee and Mississippi both have introduced legislation that would force state assessments on homeschoolers. Once the government is allowed to set tests for homeschoolers, homeschooling is undermined as a viable educational choice because parents are forced to use the state-mandated curriculum and teach to the test rather than make their own choice of curriculum.

Flexibility in choosing curriculum is vital to homeschooling because each child is unique and has an individual learning style.

These types of continuing threats galvanize homeschoolers throughout the country. While homeschoolers are active and engaged citizens, we always must be mindful that homeschool freedom is fragile.

It can be lost without vigilant action on the part of all homeschoolers. As an organization with more than 80,000 members, HSLDA will continue its mission—which can continue only with the active participation of our members—and work with state organizations to make sure we do not lose any of our hard-won freedoms.

We do not know what the future holds, but we do know that an active, engaged homeschool community can significantly affect the outcome of legislative battles, even when the forces arrayed against homeschoolers are large and powerful.

Michael Smith is the president of the Home School Legal Defense Association. He may be contacted at (540)338-5600; or send email to [email protected].

http://www.hslda.org/docs/news/washi.../200802250.asp
 
Old February 25th, 2008 #58
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[This is the idea: large Germanic families with all the children homeschooled. Christians can do it - so can Whites. Whether the Conrads think of it that way or not, they have gone a very long way toward dejewing their lives. You do it too. Note the Conrads are part of a 6,000 family network across Nebraska. That sort of local/state networking is precisely what Whites need to do. Homeschooling...communal defense...self-government.]

Home-school pitch pits personal choice vs. government role

BY JEFFREY ROBB
WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER


Natalie and Chris Conrad's three oldest children learn about the Crusades during a home-schooling lesson taught by Natalie. The kids, from left, are Ashley, Brooke and Bradley.

When school is in session for the Conrad kids, the living room of their northwest Omaha home is often their classroom.

Natalie and Chris Conrad's three oldest children learn about the Crusades during a home-schooling lesson taught by Natalie. The kids, from left, are Ashley, Brooke and Bradley.

Lessons last as long as needed to complete the day's tasks.

Mother Natalie Conrad is the teacher to her three school-age children.

Natalie and Chris Conrad's family is part of the 6,000-student home-school network across Nebraska. And the family is a small part of a debate in the Nebraska Legislature pitting personal choices and religious freedoms against state government's educational responsibilities.

State Sen. DiAnna Schimek of Lincoln has proposed a bill to recast Nebraska's generally loose regulations over home-school students.

Her bill would require home-school students to take state-mandated tests or have their schoolwork assessed by an outside evaluator. If students' progress falls short academically, they would be sent to public or private schools.

Nebraska's home-school system developed amid controversy in the 1980s. Since then, families have been able to opt out of public and private schools with little oversight from state government.

Schimek said the system leaves the state without a way to check into potential problems.

"Our responsibility is to see that the children of the state do have access to an education," she said. "That's a constitutional responsibility."

Chris Conrad said he and his wife were called by their Christian faith to take personal responsibility for educating their children. He said the bill would take away a responsibility best kept with parents.

"It's the parents' responsibility to educate the child, not the state's," Conrad said.

Nebraska's home-school families have mobilized against Legislative Bill 1141, which will have a public hearing Tuesday before the Education Committee.

For all the debate spawned by the bill, it stands little chance of becoming law. By Tuesday, the Legislature will be halfway into its short session. The bill also lacks the priority tag that gives bills the best chance of being debated by the full Legislature.

If it does pass, Gov. Dave Heineman has said he will veto the measure.

"The bill presents a heavy-handed, state government regulatory approach to this issue which, in my view, is not warranted," Heineman said in a statement. "It dramatically infringes on Nebraska parents' choices regarding the education of their children."

In 1984, the Legislature created Nebraska's home-school laws to settle the controversy over a church school in Louisville that operated without state-certified teachers.

Parents originally were allowed a religious exemption from sending their children to public or private schools. The exemption was expanded to allow any parents to opt out if they felt that was the best thing for their child's education.

Today, home-school students account for about 2 percent of school-age children statewide.

According to the Home School Legal Defense Association, Nebraska is among the 24 states with low or no home-school regulations. Iowa's regulations are considered moderate because the state requires testing, such as Schimek is proposing, unless a licensed teacher runs the home school.

Some studies have noted that home-school students score higher than their public school peers nationally. Home-school students, for instance, have consistently outperformed the national average on the ACT college entrance exam: 22.5 compared with 20.9 in 2005.

For Nebraska's Class of 2005, 103 home-school students who took the ACT scored a 22.9 on average, compared with the state average of 21.8.

Local supporters say that they believe students are doing well and that they see it in their own homes.

"To me, this seems to be a solution in search of a problem," said Ken Dick, president of the Home Educators Network, a faith-based organization working with home schools in eastern Nebraska and western Iowa. "And there is no problem."

Schimek said she believes that some home schools are doing a good job. Although her husband is a lobbyist for the state teachers union, Schimek said that did not influence her decision to introduce the bill.

She said her concern comes from the stories she hears about students who are kept out of public or private schools but receive little to no schooling.

That concern reveals a conflict between Nebraska's policies and its practices regarding home-school oversight.

Current regulations allow state officials to visit home schools, impose testing and withdraw a family's exemption if the children aren't meeting the basic academic requirements.

But Russ Inbody, an administrator with the Nebraska Department of Education, said officials are operating under an opinion from the Nebraska Attorney General's Office that the state can't deny a family's right to opt out of state regulations.

Inbody said he was not aware that the department had ever employed the oversight provisions. If someone suspects a problem, he recommended contacting another state agency, the Department of Health and Human Services.

Education Commissioner Doug Christensen declined to take sides on the bill. He said the state should support parents' choices. But he also said he understands the need for public accountability in all education, including home schools.

"Can you say it's working very well? Not really. Can you say it's working horribly? Not really," he said. "We just don't know."

Home-school supporters say Nebraska's current rules and truancy laws are sufficient to address any problem situations.

If Nebraska implements a testing system, families will lose the ability to teach what they choose as they adapt to what's being tested, said Colleen McNamara, president of the Catholic Homeschool Association of Omaha.

Deb Badeer, a legislative liaison for the Nebraska Christian Home Educators Association, said the issue goes beyond home schooling, amounting to a threat to families' religious freedom and parental rights.

"They have no need to be intrusive, if you will, into the family's privacy," Badeer said.

The Conrads now have taught 11-year-old Brooke, 9-year-old Ashley and 5-year-old Bradley at home. Andrew, who is 3, will be next.

Chris Conrad said his two oldest children have taken annual standardized tests, at the family's choice and cost. Conrad said Brooke and Ashley's results were "at or way above" grade level.

Friday, Brooke proved her language skills against public and private school competition. She won the Douglas County Spelling Bee over seven competitors and will advance to the Midwest Regional Spelling Bee.

"We've taken on this huge responsibility," Conrad said. "We take it seriously."

http://www.hslda.org/docs/link.asp?U...sid%3D10266451
 
Old February 25th, 2008 #59
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[Typical enemy of homeschooling, the Nebraska state senator who introduced a bill to, in essence, ban it...]

[A little digging into the background of the woman responsible for the most anti-homeschooling bill in the past year reveals she is very likely either a jew or married to one. She has a children named Samuel and Saul, and has collected awards from the likes of ACLU. Homeschooling is "good for Whites," and that means it isn't "good for jews." So they move to ban it.]


Sen. DiAnna Schimek (District 27, Lincoln)

Sen. DiAnna SchimekHome Address: 6437 Lone Tree Dr., Lincoln, NE 68512

Office Address: Room 1124, State Capitol, Lincoln, NE 68509

Phone: (402) 471-2632

E-mail: [email protected]

Elected to Nebraska Legislature: 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004

Committees: Legislative Performance Audit (chairperson); Judiciary; Transportation and Telecommunications; Committee on Committees

Biography: Born March 21, 1940, in Holdrege.
Education: Graduate of Alma High School, 1958; attended Colorado Women’s College, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; graduate of Kearney State College (B.A. in education), 1963; graduate work at UNL and Kearney State College.
Family: Married Herbert Henry Schimek, June 1, 1963; two children: Samuel Wolfgang and Saul William. [I have never heard of a gentile named Saul]
Former: Realtor, teacher.
Member: Downtown Rotary 14; Habitat for Humanity Board; P.E.O., NAACP; Delta Kappa Gamma.
Honors and awards: ACLU Civil Libertarian Award, National Guard Homeland Security Ribbon, Nebraska Women’s Commission Alice Paul Award, Chicano Awareness Center’s Education Award, 2006; Harold Sieck Award, ARC of Nebraska, 2004; Lincoln Interfaith Council Leadership Award, 2003; Distinguished Service Award, Nebraska League of Municipalities, 2002; Legislator of the Year Award, Nebraska Dental Hygienist Association, 2001; Woman of Distinction, Soroptomists of Lincoln, 2000; Distinguished Service Award, National Guard Association of Nebraska, 2000; Woman of the Year, NOVA Chapter of Business and Professional Women, 1999; UNK Outstanding Alumni Award, 1989; honorary member, Mortar Board.

Although her husband is a lobbyist for the state teachers union, Schimek said that did not influence her decision to introduce the bill. LOL!
 
Old February 26th, 2008 #60
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No, of course her husband being a lobbyist for the teachers union did not influence her. Of course not. Couldn't happen! She's all pure & clean.
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