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Old August 27th, 2008 #21
Alex Linder
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Pre-Incan Wari Mummy Found - With BLUE Stone Eyes

http://vnnforum.com/showthread.php?t=78953
 
Old August 2nd, 2009 #22
Epirus
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Did the Blacks forget how did they move to Northern America ?
They're kings sell them to the European traders as animals !
NEVER FORGET IT BLACKS !
Your 'kings' sell you as animals !
Don't call us tyrants ! Your brothers treat you as dogs !
 
Old August 29th, 2010 #23
Hugh
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Default White red-haired giants in the Midwest

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Secede. Control taxbases/municipalities. Use boycotts, divestment, sanctions, strikes.
http://www.aeinstein.org/wp-content/...d-Jan-2015.pdf
https://canvasopedia.org/wp-content/...Points-web.pdf
 
Old August 29th, 2010 #24
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Good stuff, Hugh. I know there's a whole underground archaeology scene, but I don't follow it. Lots of magazines and private diggers.
 
Old September 26th, 2010 #25
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Archaeological evidence points to Whites having come over from Europe first.

__________________
Secede. Control taxbases/municipalities. Use boycotts, divestment, sanctions, strikes.
http://www.aeinstein.org/wp-content/...d-Jan-2015.pdf
https://canvasopedia.org/wp-content/...Points-web.pdf
 
Old September 26th, 2010 #26
O*R*I*O*N
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Wink More than 6000 Years Ago - Can't have Happened.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh View Post
Archaeological evidence points to Whites having come over from Europe first.

YouTube - Ice age Columbus part 1/9
In the hivemind of multicult-lobotomized xian kwans, anything that happened before 6000 b.c.e. doesn't involve human beings. Or the Earth.

That was before Big-kike-in-the-sky a.k.a. YAHWEH created everything, remember?
Can't have happened.

Nevertheless, here is another video on the subject:
http://www.vnnforum.com/video.php?do...s&videoid=1208
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Old December 16th, 2010 #27
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Immigrants From The Other Side (Clovis Is Solutrean?)
CSFA ^ | 11-3-2003 | Dennis Sanford

Posted on 11/2/2003 6:11:21 PM by blam

Immigrants from the Other Side?

According to the Clovis-First theory, for decades the gospel preached by authorities on the peopling of the Americas, the first Americans walked across the Bering Land Bridge from Asia about 12,000 years ago, and after finding a corridor through the Cordilleran Ice Sheet--admittedly it wasn't an easy trip and the timing was tricky--descended into temperate North America. We know them by their classic fluted points, unlike any others in the world, they left at campsites on their journey south to populate Central and South America.

[~ 45:l ~] There have been variations of the basic theory. The Greenberg hypothesis asserts that not one but three waves of Asian travelers crossed on foot, each founding a different linguistic family. Recently anthropologist C. Loring Brace of the University of Michigan revealed the results of his study, which postulates that two crossings, one on foot 15,000 years ago, the other by water 10,000 years later, gave rise to two linguistically unique peoples ("New Study," MT 16-4). Asians again.

Even before 1997, when a panel of authorities inspected the Monte Verde site in Chile and conceded that radiocarbon-dated evidence of human occupation predates the earliest Clovis sites in North America by 1,000 years (which makes it difficult to defend the theory of a north-to-south population movement), Smithsonian archaeologist Dennis Stanford was looking in a different direction for the origin of the first people that entered America. He was looking not west to Asia, but east to Europe.

Dropping a cold trail for a warmer one

Dr. Stanford is no maverick. His mentors were luminaries in American peopling studies: the late Marie Wormington, Curator of Archaeology at the Denver Museum of Natural History for 31 years and author of classic texts on early Americans, whose seminal field work in the Southwest in the 1930s shaped the practice for those who followed her; and C. Vance Haynes, Jr. of the University of Arizona, who probably more than any other person has defined the Clovis culture (and who today continues to reserve judgment on the validity of Tom Dillehay's purported pre-Clovis Monte Verde site). Stanford, for much of his professional life, was an enthusiastic Clovis-First advocate.

[~ 46:r ~] What made him turn away from the Bering route and look elsewhere for the first migration? His thinking evolved over three decades. In the '60s Stanford, like most of his colleagues, believed that Clovis came from Asia. It wasn't until the '70s that he began to believe that Clovis was a New World development and that evidence of pre-Clovis would be found in the Arctic. "But I wasn't seeing evidence," he recalls, "and after a while it started not to make sense. Everything I found in Alaska that was fluted was post-Clovis in age." There was no technology he considered pre-Clovis. He hoped at the time that once Siberia was opened up to Western scientists we would find the missing evidence. But the end of the Cold War didn't provide the solution for Stanford and his co-theorist, lithics expert Bruce Bradley. Stanford and Dr. Bradley independently looked at the evidence and arrived at the same conclusion. They inspected late-Pleistocene sites and scoured museum collections in Siberia, Russia, and northern China, seeking pre-Clovis technology. Instead, what they found was a totally different method of making tools and weapons.

The Clovis fluted point is knapped from stone, flaked on both sides (bifacial) and shaped into a beautiful thin, flat killing instrument; the base is thinned and relieved into a concave recess so that the point can be securely hafted onto a foreshaft or shaft. (See "Lithic Caches" in this issue for a photo of spectacular examples of Clovis points.) The Asian upper-Paleolithic weapons that Stanford and Bradley found, however, were made using a microblade technology, where tiny blades struck from wedge-shaped cores of stone were inset into long, narrow rods of bone, antler, or ivory. When Far East craftsmen tried to make bifacial tools, the result was relatively crude implements (quite thick in cross section, compared with exquisitely thin Clovis points) and frequently bi-pointed. Stanford and Bradley suspect the Asian bifaces were knives instead of projectile points.

True, they found assemblages containing bifaces and large blade cores. But those sites are in the Trans-Baikal region of central Asia--about 6,000 miles from Alaska--and date to 10,000 years before Clovis. To Bradley they appear to belong to the Streletskayan technology of the Eurasian Plain and not to the Far East.

[~ 47:l ~] Nowhere in Asia did Stanford and Bradley find the ancestor of the Clovis point. They reasoned that if the first immigrants were Asian, they must have brought with them their inset-microblade manufacturing process, in which case there must exist evidence of a transition to Clovis technology. So far, however, nothing resembling an intermediate form between inset microblades and a knapped biface has been found in North America.

Stuck at a dead end, Stanford and Bradley took up a fresh trail. The roots of Clovis, they reasoned, must lie in the Paleolithic Old World outside of Asia. They took up the search for a parent technology that specialized in making thin, flat bifacial projectile points, knives and other biface implements, and other artifacts of stone and bone similar to those of the Clovis culture. They didn't demand of the candidate that it precisely match Clovis technology, only that it exhibit features that could be reasonably interpreted as pre-Clovis. They found only one Paleolithic culture whose technology met their criteria, suggested by Nels Nelson of the American Museum of Natural History early in the 20th century and later by University of Arizona archaeologist Art Jelinek in an article published in 1971 in Arctic Anthropology: the Solutrean people. Named for the French town of Solutré, the culture spread across much of France and the Iberian Peninsula. Stanford and Bradley look to northern Spain and southwestern France for the people who might have carried pre-Clovis technology across the Atlantic.

Newest members in a family with a long history

Whatever problems beset European archaeologists, they don't suffer from a dearth of evidence of early human occupations. The Mousterian culture of the Neanderthals, for example, has been traced back 250,000 years. The Neanderthals made tools of stone, some of them eye-catching even today, but they weren't innovators. For more than 100,000 years they continued to reproduce the same tools using the same pattern, never varying. Says French prehistorian François Bordes, "They made beautiful tools stupidly."

[~ 48:r ~] About 30,000 years ago, at the start of the upper Paleolithic, Neanderthals seem to disappear. Their place is taken by Cro-Magnon man, modern humans who brought with them a culture probably developed in Asia. The Aurignacian period ushered in the beginnings of communal activity and living. People hunted and fished in organized groups, lived in the first man-made shelters, wore sewn clothing, and left the first evidence of belief in magic and the supernatural. They were imaginative artists who decorated cave walls with their paintings and carved ornaments of bone, horn, and ivory. Moreover, they crafted new kinds of tools, including projectile points, of different materials including flint and obsidian.

We find the first evidence about 25,000 years ago of the Gravettians, whose range eventually extended from Russia to Spain. They brought west with them improved methods of knapping spear tips of stone, making them more lethal and easier to sharpen, and the atlatl, a spear thrower that effectively lengthens the hunter's arm and thereby increases the power and range of the thrown spear. Recent finds in Czechoslovakia are convincing evidence that the Gravettians were also weavers, not just of basketry and textiles, but also of nets for snaring small animals. Change was happening faster and faster in Europe, each group of newcomers building on the foundation laid by the existing population.

Enter killers with a flair for art

About 20,000 years ago a new group arrived, some scholars think from the east, others from North Africa. They took up residence in caves and rockshelters in France and Spain--and western Europe was never the same again. We call them the Solutreans. They were highly efficient hunters, the likes of whom probably weren't seen again until the white slaughterers of the American buffalo in the 19th century. Estimates of the number of wild horses killed in the upper Paleolithic at Solutré alone range from 30,000 to 100,000. Full bellies gave them leisure time, which they used to decorate the walls of their caves with fabulous surrealistic paintings of bison and horses and ibex that continue to awe us today. They were carvers, too, for art's sake. In Solutrean sites we find carved limestone tablets--at one site in Spain there are stacks of hundreds. Stanford describes them as "3 to 6 inches long, 3 inches wide, and half an inch thick. The design, sometimes zoomorphic, sometimes geomorphic, is engraved on one side or both." They weren't drilled and made into pendants. They don't do anything. Perhaps they have religious significance. Or perhaps they just are.

What made the Solutreans deadly efficient hunters was their unprecedented skill at fashioning tools and weapons from stone. In the 4,000 years of their supremacy we can see their knapping creations evolve from unifacial points (later reappearing as the willow-leaf point, unifacial again, but of extraordinary delicacy and fineness) to bifacial laurel-leaf points and blades.

[~ 49:l ~] "They had the only upper-Paleolithic biface technology going in Western Europe," Stanford points out. They were the first to heat-treat flint, and the first to use pressure flaking--removing flakes by pressing with a hardwood or antler tool, rather than by striking with another stone. "In northern Spain, their technology produced biface projectile points with concave bases that are basally thinned," he notes, not bothering to say he could just as well be describing Clovis points. The pressure flakes Solutrean knappers removed are so long it's almost a fluting technique--"almost," he's careful to say, but not quite.

The parallels between Solutrean and Clovis flintknapping techniques seem endless. The core technology, "the way they were knocking off big blades and setting up their core platforms," he explains, "is very similar to the Clovis technique, if not identical." They perfected the outre passé--overshot--flaking technique later seen in Clovis, which removes a flake across the entire face of the tool from margin to margin. It's a complicated procedure, he emphasizes, that has to be set up and steps followed precisely in order to detach regular flakes predictably. When you see outre passé flaking in other cultures, you're looking at a knapper's mistake. The Solutreans, though, set up platforms and followed the technique through to the end, exactly as we see in Clovis. "No one else in the world does that," Stanford insists. "There is very little in Clovis--in fact, nothing--that is not found in Solutrean technology," he declares.

Archaeologist Kenneth Tankersley of Kent State University seconds Stanford and Bradley's opinion: "There are only two places in the world and two times that this technology appears--Solutrean and Clovis."


[~ 50:r ~] On and on the similarities pile up. We find carved tablets in Clovis sites remarkably similar to Solutrean specimens. Both cultures cached toolstone and finished implements. (See "Lithic Caches" in this issue.) Stanford and Bradley know of about 20 instances of caches at Solutrean sites; in North America, by comparison, according to Stanford, "we're up to about nine or ten." Just like Clovis knappers, Solutreans used flakes detached by outre passé to make scrapers and knives. Clovis bone projectile points bear an uncanny resemblance to ones made by Solutreans. When French archaeologists saw the cast of a wrench used by Clovis craftsmen at the Murray Springs site in Arizona to straighten spear shafts, they declared it remarkably similar to one found at a Solutrean site.

In 1997 Stanford was invited by French archaeologists to bring specimens of Clovis tools and weapons to an exhibit at the museum of Solutré, organized by Anta Montet-White and Jack Hofman of the University of Kansas. It was on that trip in the summer of 1997 that Stanford, able to compare Solutrean and Clovis tools side by side, became confident he was looking at products of technologies so similar there was a high probability they were in fact historically related technologies--one culture--separated only by time and distance.

A tough mouthful for critics to swallow

Stanford and Bradley know it's asking a lot of their fellow archaeologists to accept the idea that the first immigrants set foot on the Atlantic seaboard of North America. Time and distance are indeed hurdles of considerable height. The Clovis and Solutrean cultures are separated in time by more than 4,000 years, in space by the Atlantic ocean--nearly 3,000 miles today.

[~ 51:l ~] When Stanford and Bradley are in a temporizing mood, they allow the possibility that the astonishing constellation of similarities that exist between Solutrean and Clovis technologies may be the result of independent invention, that bright chaps at two different times and at two different places on Earth may have hit on the same ideas--a lot of them--each by himself without outside influence. Indeed, Stanford is by no means an inflexible dogmatist. "It's very clear to me, at least," he is quick to state, "that we are looking at multiple migrations through a very long time period--of many peoples of many different ethnic origins, if you will, that came in at different times."

For the record, Stanford and Bradley say they push their theory "as the most parsimonious conclusion based on the best available data currently available." But if you talk to Dennis Stanford one-on-one about this particular migration that establishes the Solutrean-Clovis connection, he doesn't hedge. You quickly realize he is a self-assured scientist who is supremely confident that time will prove him right. Listen to his argument, and you have to allow that he has thought a great deal about every side of this theory.

Tackling the question of time

Setting aside for the time being the problem of how Solutreans crossed the Atlantic, and assuming it was a trip they could undertake and survive, the question then arises: Why don't we see signs of their presence in North America 4,000 years before Clovis?

[~ 52:r ~] But we do see evidence of them, Stanford and Bradley counter, at two sites. At Meadowcroft Rockshelter in Pennsylvania, stratified deposits that predate Clovis by several thousand years--the lowest occupation level dates to 19,000 years ago--have yielded remains of basketry and lithic artifacts including blades and points, unfluted bifacial projectile points. Clovis-First proponents have contested the radiocarbon dates for nearly three decades now, asserting that radiocarbon dating samples may have been contaminated with coal particles or other carboniferous material carried by groundwater. Although geomorphologist Paul Goldberg of Boston University in 1999 declared unequivocally that "no trace of groundwater activity could be seen"--after minutely examining 25 samples from six layers at Meadowcroft--James Adovasio's labors still haven't received universal recognition.

Meadowcroft Rockshelter would stand as a one-of-a-kind perturbation in the archaeological record if not for the Cactus Hill site in eastern Virginia. The hill is the accumulation of windblown sand over many thousands of years, according to Joseph and Lynn McAvoy, whose private consulting firm, Nottoway River Survey, has been excavating side by side with the Archaeological Society of Virginia. What they've found is a continuum of human occupations dating backwards from the colonial period--witness a pipe stem and a sixpence piece dated 1696--to the Clovis culture. Below the Clovis level, above a bed of sterile clay, they found an assemblage of stone tools including blades and cores and thin bifacial points. Radiocarbon dates from a hearth and other features put human occupation at 15,000-17,000 RCYBP, or about 18,000 to 20,000 years ago. Artifacts from Cactus Hill share so many of the features of the Meadowcroft Rockshelter finds that Stanford and Bradley contend the two sites could be considered related technologies, or even two instances of the same one.

Unfortunately, just as at Meadowcroft Rockshelter, a cloud of skepticism hangs over the Cactus Hill site. Any number of agents--animals, looters, even intrusive roots--could have introduced old charcoal into layers containing younger artifacts, say the McAvoys' critics. They point to different samples from the same layer reporting different ages as corroboration of their concerns about contamination. This, despite the McAvoys' repeated protests that Yale University paleobotanist Lucinda McWeeney judged the anomalous dates to be nothing more than the result of young plants burrowing downward. There's absolutely nothing to show that older material was pushed upward, say the McAvoys . . . over and over again.

[~ 53:l ~] Stanford and Bradley confess themselves mpressed by the fit of the evidence found at Meadowcroft and Cactus Hill. Bifacial weapon tips, blades, and blade cores found at the sites are technologically very similar to Solutrean examples; the radiocarbon dates (if believed) dovetail nicely with the period of the Solutrean culture and fill in the 4,000-year gap. In a paper now in press, Stanford and Bradley deplore the inequity in disallowing evidence from Meadowcroft and Cactus Hill. Their statement is a model of restraint:

Must we wait until yet a third or fourth site is found before we can take this evidence seriously? Probably so. However, we believe that this same rigor of analysis demanded by scholars of these sites has not been applied to the Beringian sites that many consider ancestral Clovis; but it should be.

Supporting evidence from a different source

Archaeological evidence isn't the only weapon in Stanford and Bradley's armory. They point out discoveries in genetics by researchers at Emory University and the Universities of Rome and Hamburg. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is inherited exclusively from the mother, normally contains four markers called haplogroups, labeled A, B, C, and D. These four are shared by 95 percent of Native Americans. Recently, however, the genetics team identified a fifth haplogroup, called X, which is present in about 20,000 Native Americans and has also been found in several pre-Columbian populations. A most interesting fact is that haplogroup X is also present in European populations but absent from Asians. The geneticists' research suggests the marker may have existed in the Americas 12,000 to 34,000 years ago, which means it must have been introduced before Clovis. By whom? Stanford and Bradley's prime candidates are Solutreans.

Now, about that Atlantic crossing . . .

There's a curious paradox at work here. The aspect of Stanford and Bradley's theory their critics find hardest to accept, that anyone could have crossed the Atlantic Ocean 20,000 years ago, doesn't worry Stanford at all. What's more, he says he rarely finds a European scientist who considers the Atlantic an insurmountable obstacle to determined Solutreans. "They aren't like landlocked Americans," he says of his European counterparts.

[~ 54:r ~] Stanford argues from a position of logic, historical data, and common sense. "Everyone knows boats have been around for 50,000 years," he says. Long ago early people in different parts of the world developed the skills needed to navigate open seas. People on the Japanese mainland 29,000 years sailed to offshore islands and returned with obsidian, their preferred toolstone. "Common sense tells us," he concludes, "one leg of the round-trip journey had to be against the current or wind or both." The early Japanese obviously solved the problems of sailing to windward. So must have done ancient mariners in Greece, where 13,000 to 14,000 years ago they regularly sailed from the mainland to collect obsidian from the offshore island of Minos. Why, then, can't we credit the Solutreans, who mastered the working of stone and created stunning works of art, with the same caliber of resourcefulness and problem-solving skills?

Evidence abounds from recent years that the Atlantic Ocean can be crossed in watercraft a lot smaller and less sophisticated than a liner. In 1896 two Norwegians, Harboe and Samuelson, rowed from New York to Le Havre in a dory, which can hardly be considered a high-tech contrivance. In 1976 Irish scholar and explorer Tim Severin built the Brendan, named after and constructed according to records left by St. Brendan, a sixth-century Irish monk, who (if you can sort myth from fact) sailed from Ireland to America. Severin built his curragh of 49 ox hides stitched to a wooden frame and waterproofed with sheep tallow, just as St. Brendan is said to have built his craft, and followed the same route described by the saint: north to the Faroes, then riding east-west currents that sweep past Iceland and Greenland. He landed at Newfoundland after a harrowing voyage--his first sail in a leather-skin boat.

There's also anecdotal evidence that amazing voyages are sometimes made by accident. The BBC in 1999 related the story of five African fishermen who were caught in a storm. In the grueling journey that followed, two died, but three eventually found themselves in South America. Dennis Stanford recalls an incident when he was working in Alaska. It was in the '60s, pre-Pipeline days, when, as he puts it, "Eskimos were still pretty much Eskimos." Stanford hunted and fished with them. "Sure," he says, "it's dangerous. You can freeze to death or get lost, but the Eskimos had been doing it for thousands of years." One day at Point Barrow he got word that two natives wanted to see him--urgently. The urgency, it turned out, was because they had heard he was visiting and wanted to talk to him about New York, to tell him what a strange city it was and how much they had enjoyed it. He asked the natural question: How in the world had they managed to see New York City? They told him their amazing story that had begun one spring, when they were hunting on the frozen Arctic Ocean. The ice broke up sooner than expected, and they found themselves adrift on an ice island. It floated around the North Pole and eventually drifted south east of Greenland. They were floating between Greenland and Iceland when the Iceland Coast Guard picked them up. They had spent the whole summer drifting. They weren't in despair, but they did admit they were starting to get a little worried because the island was melting away under their feet. They got a trip home, with a stopover in New York on the way--having made nearly a complete circumpolar voyage with minimal survival equipment.

No strangers to their marine environment

Stanford's Eskimo friends survived a voyage most of us would consider unthinkable because they were adapted to their environment. Stanford has no doubt that Solutreans, too, learned to adapt to conditions in Europe in the Last Glacial Maximum. It was a stressful time for the land and its creatures. Low temperatures, a short growing season, and scarce rainfall displaced animals and people from the interior to fertile areas along rivers and the coastline of southwestern Europe. People learned to exploit alternative resources found along estuaries and the beach, for if the Ice Age was a time of hardscrabble existence on land, it was a time of abundance along the sea. At the time of the Middle Solutrean, when Stanford and Bradley believe the Atlantic crossings were made, winter sea ice formed as far south as the Bay of Biscay. With the ice came marine life that thrived in the ice-edge habitats, including fish, sea mammals, and birds. Today Arctic waters, not the tropics, are the food factories of the oceans, where plankton and krill multiply in abundance. The same was true of the Last Glacial Maximum. Samples of deep-sea cores indicate that foraminifers, one-celled animals (their accumulated shells form the White Cliffs of Dover), found temperature and salinity quite tolerable. Presence of this basis of the food chain would have insured in turn the presence of abundant numbers of fish, and the sea mammals and birds that fed on them. "Remember," Stanford says, "that Solutreans were at least in part shore dwellers. At the time of maximum glaciation the sea level was down 130 m [about 425 ft]. They were living on the edge of the ocean. You can't tell me they didn't figure out how to exploit that really rich subarctic water that was coming into the Bay of Biscay and along the coast."

[~ 55:l ~] Stanford is confident that Solutreans adapted to a maritime way of life. Surely they built boats, almost certainly skin boats, the universal craft built by primitive people who have ready access to animals for leather and only rudimentary tools for working wood. The problem is that leather and wood are highly perishable materials. Stanford resigned himself to the probability that we would never find direct evidence to substantiate the Solutreans' seagoing skills.

Then in 1992 Le Cosquer cave was discovered near Marseilles by diver Henri Cosquer. Today the cave mouth lies 100 ft below the surface; in Solutrean times it would have been on a hillside 300 ft high several miles inland from the Mediterranean. The cave walls are profusely decorated with outlined human hands, complex geometric designs, and paintings and engravings of animals including horses, ibex, auks, and Megaloceros, the great Irish elk with 100-pound antlers spanning 11 ft. Penguins are represented, too, which speaks volumes about the diversity of game available along Pleistocene shores. But what most interests Stanford and Bradley is that among the rock art figures are depictions that may be seals impaled by harpoons as well as possible flounder and halibut--deep-sea fish! Clearly Solutreans learned how to exploit marine resources.

Steppingstones across the Atlantic

We haven't yet found the limits of the Solutreans' hunting forays and explorations. It appears they established camps on the pleniglacial beaches and estuaries of northern Spain; if so, they could easily have ranged as far north as the south coast of Ice Age Ireland. A site found in an unglaciated area of the British Isles was originally thought to be of Solutrean age; on a trip to England last spring, Stanford learned the site has been redated and is now considered even older, a pre-Solutrean occupation.

It requires only a small leap of Stanford's imagination to envision a voyage, perhaps intended, perhaps accidental, beyond areas already explored by the Solutreans. "Tell me," he says, "after 4,000 years of casting their eyes at the water, that all those hunters along the coast didn't understand weather and waves and ice. In the spring, when the ice broke up, they could put out to sea in flexible skin boats, along with huge ice islands, following the current." His critics argue that even the Titanic couldn't make the crossing. He turns the argument against them, for the same iceberg that sank the Titanic would have provided a safe haven for seafarers caught in a storm. They could have pulled their boats up onto it and huddled under the inverted hulls for shelter. For that matter, the permanent ice that bridged the Atlantic, and the sea ice that extended further south in winter, would have provided limitless opportunities to haul out their boats and hunt ice-edge game.

It was only a question of time, in Stanford's opinion, until a boatload of bold Solutreans would have traveled the mere 1,200 to 1,500 miles to the Grand Banks, which, because of the greatly lowered sea level, was the northeasternmost extension of North America. There they would have found fisheries and game animals prolific beyond their wildest dreams. They would have returned to this frozen land of plenty again and again . . . until one day an inquisitive Solutrean wondered if there wasn't some place with even more fish and game just over the western horizon. The distance from the Grand Banks to the coast of glacial North America is so short it makes the final leg of the journey inevitable.

Once here, they quite understandably would have settled initially along the shore and rivers--having just crossed the Atlantic, they would have been comfortable near water and probably uncomfortable away from it. Of course, if their first settlements were at the water's edge, they now lie under fathoms of water. Gradually, however, they would have turned their exploring instincts inland. Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Cactus Hill, Stanford and Bradley believe, just happen to be the only evidence we've found so far of the sires of Clovis.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/fr/1013315/posts

Last edited by Alex Linder; December 16th, 2010 at 04:00 AM.
 
Old December 16th, 2010 #28
Alex Linder
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Solutreans – Europeans Who Reached America First

March 22nd, 2009

“Ice Age Columbus”
- Get this DVD and show it
to All Your Friends and Family!

You’re missing out if you haven’t yet watched “Ice Age Columbus – Who Were the First Americans?”

If tens of millions of our White kinsmen see this amazing DVD, our people’s coming to their senses will be significantly accelerated. The astounding new scientific discoveries that “Ice Age Columbus” contains have the potential to cut years off of the fatal and frustrating WAIT for our fellow Whites to become sufficiently energized and informed to fight for our survival as a race.

You can buy “Ice Age Columbus” by calling The Discovery Channel Store at 1 800 475-6636. Ask for product #740597. The Discovery Channel website is at Discovery Channel store.

I’ll be putting up many more posts in this thread describing every scene of this long DVD movie/documentary, but let me summarize what it contains.

BBC article

As you watch this revolutionary DVD, you will follow two parallel narratives. One narrative is a series of interviews with the world’s top scientists on the migration they have proved took place 17,000 years ago. The other narrative is a complete movie dramatization using actors and computer graphics of the HIGHEST quality to SHOW a clan of our White ancestors making the epic first journey to the New World by humans.

The scientists are completely convincing (and brilliant) in their narrative. The actors and animators are completely convincing (and brilliant) in their narrative. Any White person who sees “Ice Age Columbus” will be convinced by them.

The actors and scientists portray our Solutrean ancestors as noble, smart, resourceful, tenacious, brave, and admirable. The actors look JUST LIKE US! There are no “caveman” beards or ooga-ooga to make these brave voyagers look different or alien from us.


Here is an all-too-brief outline of the proofs that we came to America 17,000 years ago, 6,000 years before any Asians:

1. The Solutrean spear points found everywhere in Southwestern France and Spain EXACTLY match the “Clovis” spear points which have been found across America. These “Clovis” blades are proved to be the oldest artifacts ever found in the New World. The show begins with a close-up zoom onto a 17,000-year-old spear point that has been found in Virginia. It is a Solutrean spear/knife blade. You can see it. And, more importantly, the world’s top scientists (white guys, of course) in the field are sure of it. And they tell you this in the DVD.

2. The ONLY way that the very unique, very skilled Solutrean flint-knapping technology could have gotten to America is that somebody had to BRING it with them.

3. No Solutrean-type point has ever been found in Asia. Anywhere. Ever.

4. Solutrean points are everywhere in France and Spain.

5. Exactly at the SAME 17,000-year-old date as the appearance of Solutrean blades in Virginia, the North Atlantic was covered by a 30-foot-thick solid sheet of ice that stretched in a giant arc from Southwestern France to the (above water then) Grand Banks of North America. The ice-age ocean was 500 feet lower than it is today. Coastlines extended much further as a consequence.

6. Solutrean caves (like the Lascaux caves of France) show that Solutreans hunted seals. Seals lived on and under that great ice sheet. Seal meat, seal hide, seal bone, and seal fat provide everything needed to make the journey.

7. In addition to the previously unknown vast ice sheet stretching solid from France to Newfoundland, new super-computers show that there was a very fast (4 miles per hour) counter eddy that floated huge broken rafts of the broken sea ice westward from Europe to North America like a giant people-mover. Solutreans stuck on these huge blocks were quickly moved across the North Atlantic. They had already mastered the technology of surviving in super cold back in France, where a worsening Ice Age was driving them to starvation in extreme cold.

8. The Solutreans’ best source of the meat they desperately needed to survive was seals out along the vast arc of sea ice.

9. The Solutreans could easily make skin boats that were big and adequate to the journey.

10. The Solutreans got water from melting sea ice with burning seal fat, which gave them a heat source.

11. American geneticists have proved that a unique DNA haplogroup marker that they have found present in some American Indian DNA must have come from the only other place it is found….in Europe. And thus, Europeans had to bring it. They have also shown that this haplogroup DNA is 17,000 years old.

There are dozens more revolutionary discoveries like these above that I don’t have time to list right now. But others in this thread, who have seen the DVD (or the TV show) can describe them in subsequent posts, as I will too.

Anyway….here’s the concluding point: this DVD, “Ice Age Columbus”, might be the most important White Nationalist educational tool on DVD in years. The scientists don’t need to be White Nationalists. Who knows what their racial views are. The important thing is that the FACTS they have discovered ARE White Nationalist facts.

Stan Hess tried to get copies of this DVD, and initially encountered a suspect disappearance of “Ice Age Columbus” from the Discovery catalog. But repeated calls and orders to Discovery appear to have brought this masterpiece of science and film-making back into the catalog, so that you can order it too. I’ll look up the price for you in one of my next posts.

http://scot.altermedia.info/general/...irst_1572.html
 
Old March 17th, 2011 #29
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The French anthropologist Jaques de Mahieu wrote about the Nordic presence in Latin America before the arrival of Columbus. De Mahieu was a member of the SS Charlemagne Division, and after he influenced Juan Domingo Perón when he arrived to Argentina.

Regards.

PS: Sorry for my awful English.
 
Old April 17th, 2011 #30
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Default Solutreans and Clovis points

Solutreans and Clovis Points

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Old April 17th, 2011 #31
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Default Neanderthals and Cro Magnon

Neanderthals 1/10






Neanderthal vs Cro Magnon 1/10

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Old April 17th, 2011 #32
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There were no populations of whites in the Americas prior to Scandinavian colonizers. As put in Mitochondrial Population Genomics Supports a Single Pre-Clovis Origin with a Coastal Route for the Peopling of the Americas, "Native American populations exhibit almost exclusively five mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups (A–D and X). Haplogroups A–D are also frequent in Asia, suggesting a northeastern Asian origin of these lineages. However, the differential pattern of distribution and frequency of haplogroup X led some to suggest that it may represent an independent migration to the Americas. Here we show, by using 86 complete mitochondrial genomes, that all Native American haplogroups, including haplogroup X, were part of a single founding population, thereby refuting multiple-migration models." More to the point, "In this study, we analyze 86 mtDNA genomes (58 of them new) belonging to all five major Native American haplogroups (A2, B2, C1, D1, and X2a) to provide a better understanding of the timing and mode of the peopling of the New World. Our analysis suggests a complex scenario for this migration, in which the founding population underwent a moderate bottleneck during the LGM to expand along the continent toward the end of the LGM, around 18 kya, probably via a Pacific coastal route. Furthermore, we support a model in which all mtDNA haplogroups were present in this expansion, thus refuting multiple migration scenarios such as the Solutrean hypothesis."
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Old April 18th, 2011 #33
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There were no populations of whites in the Americas prior to Scandinavian colonizers.
According to your own people there were, and the tools and evidence all prove that there were.

Your ancestors worked for them as hired labourers, then outbred them.
Then your ancestors killed and ate them, Valdez.
They even ate the babies, Valdez.

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Old April 18th, 2011 #34
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Originally Posted by N.M. Valdez View Post
There were no populations of whites in the Americas prior to Scandinavian colonizers.
And at some point in the next few generations there will be no populations of American injuns left in the Americas. Or anywhere else.
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Old May 15th, 2011 #35
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[According to articles above, artefacts from sites on the Atlantic coast are older than the one in this article.]

Oldest American artefact unearthed

Oregon caves yield evidence of continent's first inhabitants.


An Oregon cave has yielded the oldest artefact ever found in the Americas.

Archaeologists claim to have found the oldest known artefact in the Americas, a scraper-like tool in an Oregon cave that dates back 14,230 years.

The tool shows that people were living in North America well before the widespread Clovis culture of 12,900 to 12,400 years ago, says archaeologist Dennis Jenkins of the University of Oregon in Eugene.

Studies of sediment and radiocarbon dating showed the bone's age. Jenkins presented the finding late last month in a lecture at the University of Oregon.

His team found the tool in a rock shelter overlooking a lake in south-central Oregon, one of a series of caves near the town of Paisley.

Kevin Smith, the team member who uncovered the artefact, remembers the discovery. "We had bumped into a lot of extinct horse, bison and camel bone – then I heard and felt the familiar ring and feel when trowel hits bone," says Smith, now a master's student at California State University, Los Angeles. "I switched to a brush. Soon this huge bone emerged, then I saw the serrated edge. I stepped back and said: 'Hey everybody — we got something here.'"
Coprolite controversy

Whether the cave dwellers were Clovis people or belonged to an earlier culture is uncertain. None of the Clovis people's distinct fluted spear and arrow points have been found in the cave.

"They can't yet rule out the Paisley Cave people weren't Clovis," says Jon Erlandson, an archaeologist at the University of Oregon who wasn't involved in the research.

The only other American archaeological site older than Clovis is at Monte Verde in Chile, which is about 13,900 years old.

Last year, Jenkins and colleagues reported that Paisley Cave coprolites, or fossilized human excrement, dated to 14,000 to 14,270 years ago1. That report established the Paisley Caves as a key site for American archaeology.

Analysis of ancient DNA marked the coprolites as human. But in July, another group argued that the coprolites might be younger than the sediments that contained them2.

This team, led by Hendrik Poinar of McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, also questioned the 2008 report because no artefacts had been found in the crucial sediments. The Oregon team strongly disputed the criticisms3.
Laid to rest?

The dating of the bone tool, and the finding that the sediments encasing it range from 11,930 to 14,480 years old, might put these questions to rest. "You couldn't ask for better dated stratigraphy," Jenkins told the Oregon meeting.

"They have definitely made their argument even stronger," says Todd Surovell, an archaeologist at the University of Wyoming in Laramie who was not involved in the research.

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Other researchers questioned whether the cave's inhabitants would have been mainly vegetarian, as the coprolites suggested4. (Editor's note: Please see the comments thread of this article for the authors of this reference weighing in on the significance of their work.) In his recent lecture Jenkins noted other evidence reflecting a diet short on meat but including edible plants such as the fernleaf biscuitroot Lomatium dissectum.

In late September, a group of archaeologists who study the peopling of the Americas met with federal officials and a representative of the local Klamath tribe to review the evidence at Paisley Caves. The specialists spent two days examining sediments, checking the tool, and assessing other plant and animal evidence.

"It was an impressive presentation," says David Meltzer, an archaeologist at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, who attended the meeting. "This is clearly an important site, but there are some tests that need to be done to seal the deal." One key, he says, is to better understand how the specimens got to the cave.

http://www.nature.com/news/2009/0911...2009.1058.html
 
Old May 15th, 2011 #36
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Texas A&M-led study shows earliest American residents came at least 15,500 years ago

COLLEGE STATION, March 24, 2011— New discoveries at a Central Texas archaeological site by a Texas A&M University-led research team prove that people lived in the region far earlier – as much as 2,500 years earlier – than previously believed, rewriting what anthropologists know about when the first inhabitants arrived in North America. That pushes the arrival date back to about 15,500 years ago.

Michael Waters, director of Texas A&M's Center for the Study of First Americans, along with researchers from Baylor University, the University of Illinois-Chicago, the University of Minnesota, and Texas State University, have found the oldest archaeological evidence for human occupation in Texas and North America at the Debra L.

Friedkin site, located about 40 miles northwest of Austin. Their work is published in the current issue of Science magazine.
Waters says that buried in deposits next to a small spring-fed stream is a record of human occupation spanning the last 15,500 years. Near the surface is the record of the Late Prehistoric and Archaic occupants of the region. Buried deeper in the soil are layers with Folsom and Clovis occupations going back 12,000 to 13,000 years ago.

"But the kicker was the discovery of nearly 16,000 artifacts below the Clovis horizon that dated to 15,500 years ago," Waters notes.

"Most of these are chipping debris from the making and resharpening of tools, but over 50 are tools. There are bifacial artifacts that tell us they were making projectile points and knives at the site," Waters says. There are expediently made tools and blades that were used for cutting and scraping."

Multiple studies have shown that the site is undisturbed and that the artifacts are in place and over 60 "luminescence dates" show that early people arrived at the site by 15,500 years ago, Waters explains. Luminescence dating technique is a method used to date the sediment surrounding the artifacts. It dates the last time the sediment was exposed to sunlight.

For more than 80 years, it has been argued that the Clovis people were the first to enter the Americas, Waters says. He goes on to say that over the last few decades, there have been several credible sites which date older than Clovis found in North America -- specifically in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Florida, and Oregon.

"However, this evidence is not very robust," Waters observes.

"What is special about the Debra L. Friedkin site is that it has the largest number of artifacts dating to the pre-Clovis time period, that these artifacts show an array of different technologies, and that these artifacts date to a very early time.

"This discovery challenges us to re-think the early colonization of the Americas. There's no doubt these tools and weapons are human-made and they date to about 15,500 years ago, making them the oldest artifacts found both in Texas and North America."

Waters has been working at the site since 2006, and analysis of the artifacts collected from the site is ongoing. Waters says, "These studies will help us figure out where these people came from, how they adapted to the new environments they encountered, and understand the origins of later groups like Clovis."

###

Funding for the project was provided by the North Star Archaeological Research Program and the Chair in First American Studies.

For more about the Center for the Study of the First Americans, go to http://csfa.tamu.edu/

Contact: Michael Waters at (979) 845-5246 or [email protected], Blair Williamson, College of Liberal Arts, at (979) 458-1347 or [email protected] or Keith Randall, News & Information Services, at (979) 845-4644 or [email protected]

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releas...-tas032111.php
 
Old May 16th, 2011 #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh View Post
According to your own people there were, and the tools and evidence all prove that there were.

Your ancestors worked for them as hired labourers, then outbred them.
Then your ancestors killed and ate them, Valdez.
They even ate the babies, Valdez.

YouTube - Cannibalism and the Anasazi, part 1 of 6
And while you spuriously twist religious mythology, will you be doing the same with this? Negroid roots of Ireland

Quote:
Ancient Irish mythology refers to the original inhabitants of the island as being a giant, sea-faring people called the Fomorians (Fomors), which means "dark of the sea". They are said to be of Hamitic stock. These demons, as they are portrayed as, defeated the first few incoming waves of invaders, but could not defeat the Firbolgs, who settled the land and lived side-by-side with the native Fomors.

Two more invasions, the first led by the godly Tuatha de Danaan, and the second by the Celtic Milesians, took control of Ireland, mixing together with the Fomorians until they were no more. Today, it is regarded that these myths may, to some extent, be explaining actual history.

My theory is that the Fomorians were a real people, and that they were sailers from Africa, probably Negroid.
Let's hear all about it, Hugh.

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Originally Posted by Fred Streed View Post
And at some point in the next few generations there will be no populations of American injuns left in the Americas. Or anywhere else.
The repatriation of the euros to their homeland is actually a rather humanitarian gesture. If they attempt to continue their traditional historic patterns of destructive behavior, more decisive action based on drastically reducing or eliminating this problem population will need to be taken.

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Texas A&M-led study shows earliest American residents came at least 15,500 years ago
I posted this more than a month ago.

This is reflective of your actual interest in American archaeology, not sufficient to keep up with actual developments, but you will post something that you incorrectly perceive as supporting your fantasies when you become aware of it long after the fact.
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Old May 16th, 2011 #38
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Quote:
This is reflective of your actual interest in American archaeology, not sufficient to keep up with actual developments, but you will post something that you incorrectly perceive as supporting your fantasies when you become aware of it long after the fact.
That's not the only site that has found pre-Clovis items. None of the found items tracks with anything from Asia, but the Clovis stuff does look very much like items found in Europe.

I notice how quick the 'experts' are to rebut the pro-White thesis, since it has actual evidence behind it, whereas their asian theory has no evidence.
 
Old May 16th, 2011 #39
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George Bush 1988-1992 signed that "Indian Antiquities Act" which interferred with the Kennewick man study, and only with over forty scientist's statements to a federal judge proclaiming that Kennewick mans bones were not of the local savages and were unique ancesters so the remains could be kept.

IMO the anthropology departments of most colleges on this subject have been headed by or totally occupied by joos and they used their power as it was used by Mao's Red Guards as a type of teaching White hatred and breaking White spirits. This caused many lost Whites to believe themselves to be evil and to be ashamed of being White.

Witnessed so many Whites claiming to be Indian and so full of shit and hatred for themselves and their folks who struggled for them in the past.



I witnessed this.

The Indian b.s. book business went crazy after Dee's b.s. hate Whitey tales.

FEW know any real so called Native History, from Oregon to Quebec.

Oh, the NKVD paid trolls acting as one POS thank you for showing US all you have.


If the NPR leftist ever fully Wake up to the phucking life time of hatred, IMO they will make the Vandals look like girl Scouts.
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Old May 16th, 2011 #40
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The Texas artifacts go back 15,500 years. The problem, for you, is that there are Solutrean points that go back several thousand years before that. D'oh!
 
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