Vanguard News Network
VNN Media
VNN Digital Library
VNN Reader Mail
VNN Broadcasts

Old May 9th, 2008 #1
Klan D
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: By God Tennessee
Posts: 45
Post Slave Ownership In The Confederate South Wasn't An All White Club!

It shocks Me just how many people are willing to condemn the Wicked White Southern Man for the sins of Slavery. Well Folks as You have learned in a few Threads Posted Here on SF that:
1}Free Black's Owned African Slaves Too!
2}The White Man Wasn't Responsible For The African Slavery Situation! It Was The Jewish Race!
3}Now Yall Will Learn That Free Balck Men and Women Fought and Died On The Side Of The Confederacy During The Northern War Of Aggression!

Dammmm isn't it amazing how History is written by the victors and often is segued to favor said victors. The Truth isn't necessarily important when it gets in the way of a Lie or Cover Up! This lesion the inhabits of the Southern States in the United States know well! Hope You learn something and the truth can finally come out of the shadows!

http://southernpartysw.tripod.com/so...dsite/id4.html

Confederate Blacks

Contrary to popular believe, the South was not a "whites only club." And Blacks fought for the Confederacy as well, read some of the things I have found.

The Forgotten Confederates




"When you eliminate the black Confederate soldier, you've eliminated the history of the South." quoted from General Robert E. Lee, in 1864.




With all the flack about the Confederate flag lately, I decided to add a little Black Southron history to my site. During my research I was amazed to find there were so many free and owned black men and women who fought for the Confederacy, the South and their home.
What gets me is that all those liberals and hate groups call us racist, and from all my research blacks were treated most unfairly, paid less and went unrespected in the Northern army. While here in the South the majority of the black men who served were paid equal or more than their white counterparts, they were treated with respect and in most writings that I have found, were praised for their role in the War Between the States.
The point that I am trying to get to is that the Confederate flag holds a great history, worthy of respect from whites as well as blacks. All of our ancestors fought and died for the same thing, A Free South!!
The Confederate flag stands for slavery no more than the United States flag that your children pledge allegience to each morning before they begin their studies in our public schools. When is it going to end ? It's up to us the Southern People.

Slavery was a terrible thing and is to this day a blot on American history as well as Confederate history. Most blacks served because of loyalty to their country or loyalty to an individual; in doing so, they have demonstrated that it is possible to hate the system of slavery and love one's country.
Thousands of black Southerners found their way into battle beneath the "starry cross" of their own volition, in spite of being officially prohibited by the Confederate government. And, judging from the letters preserved in the Official Records, many more would have joined them had they the opportunity. They became an integral, important part of Southern armies. One scholar has estimated that up to 25% (65,000 out of 261,000) of free Blacks in the South and 15% (600,000 out of 4 million) of slaves sided with the South at one time during the war.

Black Southerners found their way into Confederate armies in three ways. They served as body servants, taking up arms or in other ways demonstrating their support for the war. There were many individuals who enlisted in regular units on their own. finally there were several all-black or predominately-black units in Confederate armies or local defense forces. All three catagories of black Confederates appeared at Gettsyburg.

Not all body servants were slaves owned by whites. Many were free blacks with attachments --economic and otherwise -- to the people they served. Such as : Stonewall Jackson's servant, Jim Lewis, was "inconsolable" at Jackson's death. He led Jackson's horse in the funeral procession, then returned to the army and served Colonel "Sandie" Pendleton at Gettsyburg and after, until Pendleton died at Fisher's Hill in 1864. Robert E. Lee's cook, William Mack Lee, was a free black who served the General throughout the war and until the General's death in 1870.



We often imagine the armed forces of the Confederate States of America as all white, but that is far from accurate. To imagine the Confederate armies without black Southerners in their ranks to perpetuate the historical myth of the South as a compartmentalized society. It ignores the real relationship between blacks and whites in the Old South, as well as the role and experiences of a small but significant portion of black Southerners in the Confederacy.
It is estimated that over 65,000 Southern blacks were in the Confederate ranks. Over 13,000 of these, "saw the elephant" also known as meeting the enemy in combat. These Black Confederates included both slave and free.

"It is worthy to assemble facts to put truth in the face of legend." Stephen Vincent Benet once said, "to investigate impartially, to throw new light on an old problem." While the names of thousands of prominent and little known white Confederate civilians, soldiers and politicians are written large on the pages of history, ignored are the black men and women without whom the nascent Confederacy could not have mobilized. Black historians have rejected the authenticity of Confederate blacks.
Black Confederate patriotism took many forms : slaves devoted to their owners, free blacks who donated money and labor, blacks who joined the Confederate army and slaves who loyally supervised plantations of absentee-owners.



Some examples of Black Confederates :

In Georgia a group published the following letter in the Savannah Evening News :

To Brigadier General Lawton

Commanding Military District

The undersigned free men of color, residing in the city
of Savannah and county of Chatham, fully impressed
with the feeling of duty we owe to the State of Georgia
as inhabitants thereof, which has for so long a period
extended to ourselves and families its protection, and
has been to us the source of many benefits-beg leave,
respectfully, in this hour of danger, to tender to
yourself our services, to be employed in the defense of
the state, at any place or point, at any time, or any
length of time, and in any service for which you may
consider us best fitted, and in which we can contribute
to the public good.

A group of black musicians in Richmond, calling themselves the "Confederate Ethiopian Serenaders" gave the returns of one of their concerts to help pay for gunboats and munitions.
In Nashville a company of free blacks offered their services to the Confederate government and in June the state legislature authorized Governor Harris to accept into Tennessee service all male persons of color.

In Lynchburg 70 men enlisted to fight for the defense of Virginia soon after it seceded.

In late April, 60 black Virginians carrying a Confederate flag asked to be enlisted.

In Hampton 300 blacks volunteered to serve in artillery batteries.

But perhaps the largest demonstration of all came in New Orleans. A mass meeting attended by black residents was held just after the news had arrived from Fort Sumter. They declared themselves resolved and "ready to take up arms at a moments notice and fight shoulder to shoulder with other citizens." Later one black man said to a commanding General of the State Militia, "our fathers were brought here as slaves because they were captured in war, and in hand to hand fights, too. Pardon me, General, but the only cowardly blood we have got in our veins is the white blood. "

In late August 1868, General Nathan Bedford Forrest gave an interview to a reporter. Forrest said of the black men who served with him:
...these boys stayed with me...and better Confederates did not live.


Black Confederate Nim Wilkes once said:
I was in every battle General Forrest fought after leaving Columbia...I was mustered out at Gainesville (Alabama,May 1865).

Among the black Southerners who served in Confederate armies were many who served in General Nathan Bedford Forrest's commands. Both slaves and Free Men of Color served with Forrest's Escort, his Headquarters and many other units under his command.
General Forrest made his living before the war as a cotton planter, raising livestock, and trading slaves. Like many other slaveowners, he had a paternalistic attitude toward his slaves, one that was compared to humane and benevolent. Within the restrictions imposed by the slaveholding society in which he lived, Forrest managed to treat the black Southerners with whom he came in contact as well as he perhaps could do. Judging by the actions and comments of some of the people he owned, and emancipated, he treated them with a level of respect, respect and human dignity that went significantly beyond the requirements of his profession. Many of the black Southerners he dealt with, in turn, recognized his friendship and returned it many times over, during and long after the war.
There was a large number of black Confederates that attended United Confederate Veterans meetings during the post-war era. This shows that black Confederates were held in high esteem by Confederate veterans because their application had to be approved by the white members. There were 285 black Tennesseans who applied for pensions after the war. The State of Tennessee honored these claims. The Federal government, however, would not acknowledge their service with the Confederacy.
Some black Confederates that served under General Nathan Bedford Forrest:
* Ben Davis, born March 4, 1836 in Fayette, Tennessee. Applied for pension on July 12, 1921, he was living in Memphis at that time. It is assumed that Ben Davis was with Forrest at Gainesville, Alabama in 1865.

* Nim Wilkes, born in Maury County, Tennessee, date unknown. He served as a personal servant for General Forrest and was a teamster. Somewhere between December 1862 and April 1863 Nim Wilkes joined Forrest. In August of 1915 when his pension application was submitted he was living near Crestview, Tennessee.

* Polk Arnold, born in Shelbyville, Bedford County, Tennessee in 1844. He joined the Confederate army in 1863 and served with General Forrest, Captain J.C. Jackson and Captain Boone. He served as a private in General Forrest's Escort. Arnold was killed at the battle of Harrisburg, Mississippi, July 17, 1864. His widow, Mrs. Caldonia Arnold is listed on his pension application.

* Jones Greer, born in Lincoln County, Tennessee in 1844. He served with General Forrest's Escort in 1863 or 1864. Greer was a servant for Lt. George Cowan. Lt. Cowan commanded the escort in their last battle of the war. Jones Greer was living in Marshall County, Belfast, Tennessee, at the time he filed for pension. He owned about 10 acres of land that was valued at $250. He had 3 acres of corn valued at $50.00.

* Frank Russell, born in Bedford County, Tennessee. At the time he filed his pension he was living in Williamson County, Franklin, Tennessee in 1921. Frank Russell was one of the few pensioners that had substantial assets. In 1921 he owned 60 acres of land valued at $1,080 and had about $300 in cash.

* Preston Roberts, enlisted at the first call for volunteers in 1861. Roberts' functioned unofficially as the Quartermaster under the command of General Nathan Bedford Forrest. It is more than apparent that General Forrest had a great deal of confidence in Roberts. He was in charge of all funds for the food and was in command of 75 cooks. In the post-war era Roberts was awarded the Southern Cross of Honor by the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Preston Roberts died in June 1910.

* Alfred Duke, born in Yalobusha County, Mississippi, in 1848. Alfred left for war in 1861 with his owner's son Wiley Duke. He served with the 3rd Tennessee Cavalry.

* George Hannah,born in Cheatham County, Tennessee, September 10, 1847. He enlisted on December 2, 1861. He served with Captain Sam Mays and General N.B. Forrest in the 3rd Tennessee Cavalry.

* Ned Gregory, born in Lincoln County in 1843. He filed for his pension on June 10, 1921. He was living in Winchester, Franklin County, Tennessee. He entered the Confederate Army in January of 1863 with his owner's son T.D. Gregory. He remained until April of 1864, when T.D. sent him home to make a crop. He served in the 3rd Tennessee Cavalry, Co. C, Forrest's first regiment.

* Robert Bruce Patton, born in Williamson County, Tennessee on January 4, 1846. Robert Patton served under Lieutenant Sam C. Tulloss. Patton appears to have served as a "free man of color." His father Jerry Patton, was born a free man. His father lived in Nolensville and rented from Miss Lou Rerrive Owens. He served with the 4th Tennessee Cavalry.

* Marshall Thompson born April 10, 1852. He was TEN YEARS OLD when he entered the Confederate army. His owner was Captain Arron Thompson who served with the 4th Tennessee Cavalry, Co. A. He stated on his pension application: that he "served with Colonel Starnes and Charles Temple." Two witnesses stated on the pension: "that they knew him and he was a porter for Colonel Starnes in the Confederate army."
Colonel J.W. Starnes was a physician, and one of Forrest's best officers. Charles Temple was a private in Co.I, 11th Tennessee Cavalry. Company I was a part of the original Douglas' Tennessee Partisan Ranger Battalion. It is assumed that Marshall served with Private Charles Temple after Colonel Starnes death.

* Hardin Starnes,He was another black Confederate that served with Colonel Starnes. He applied for his pension on March 15, 1929, and stated that he served with Colonel J.W. Starnes until his death in 1863.

* John Terrill, born in 1844 at the old White homestead near Franklin, Tennessee. He was the personal servant and aide to J.B. White. As a boy of sixteen he went to Mississippi and joined General Chalmer's escort. He later rode with General Forrest. Legend says John Terrill served with J.B. White to the end of the war, and became a Doctor for the black community in the post-war era. Records list "J.B. White" in the 6th Tennessee Cavalry, Co. D. It also appears that John Terrill attended U.C.V. meetings during the post-war era. A man could not attend United Confederate Veterans meetings unless he had served with honor in the war. It was a privilage to attend these meetings.

* Wright Willow, born on December 25, 1836. He served with J.P. Whitlow in Company G, 16th Tennessee Cavalry. He was at the Battle of Fort Pillow and at one time held General Forrest's horse.

* Lewis Muzzell, born September 17, 1845. He joined General Forrest's Cavalry on September 18, 1863. He served with Daniel Muzzell, who was a Private in Company E, 20th Tennessee Cavalry. Lewis Muzzell's pension application was accepted, as were all the men that are covered here. He died on April 8, 1932. His family wanted a Confederate headstone for his grave. Their wish was not granted. The Federal Government would not supply headstones for black Confederates.

* Alex Porter, born in Henry County, Tennessee. He served with General Forrest in Col. Russell's regiment and was a servant for Captain Killis Clark. He stated on his application that he was with the 20th Tennessee Cavalry, Co. F. He was a member in good standing with the U.C.V., Fitzgerald Kendall Camp #1284. He died in the city of Paris, Henry County, Tennessee on July 8, 1932.

* James Jefferson, He fought in one of the first battles and last battles of the war. He was from Summerfield, Alabama. He went by the nickname "Jim Jeff." His owner, Dr. Samuel Watkins Vaughn and Jim Jeff arrived as the 1st Battle of Manassas was starting. The 4th Alabama Infantry suffered 305 casualties during the heavy fighting. During the battle a couple of Confederate soldiers were wounded near Dr. Vaughn and Jim Jeff. Dr. Vaughn picked up one of the wounded men's muskets and joined the 4th Alabama. Jim Jeff grabbed a musket and joined the ranks beside Dr. Vaughn. In time, the Union forces were driven from the field. In the post-war era James Jefferson ran a small grocery store on the Summerfield road. The Vaughns made sure the James Jefferson received a Confederate pension, which they said was an expression of gratitude from the Confederacy.

* Cal Sharp, born September 12, 1841 in Lewis County, Tennessee. He filed for his pension on January 3, 1931. He served under General Forrest until the war ended. He died on January 26, 1935 at the age of 93.



Thus all over the South there were black men who responded to the news of war by making public demonstrations of their support for the Confederacy.
Southern blacks also supported the rebellion in individual ways. In Fort Smith, Arkansas, a black-sponsored ball raised money for soldiers. Richard Kinnard of Petersburg gave $100, and Jordan Chase of Vicksburg, a veteran of the war of 1812, gave a horse for the Confederate cavalry and pledged an additional $500 to the cause. A New Orleans real estate broker also gave $500 to the war effort.
Not all could give money, but even some of the poorest slaves supported the war : an Alabama slave gave a state regiment a bushel of sweet potatoes, possibly all he had to give. The black residents of Helena, S.C., rounded up $90 for soldier relief and in Charleston a little black girl sent "a free offering of 25 cents." The free black women of Savannah made uniforms for Southern soldiers and among the subscribers of a Confederate loan in Columbus, Georgia, was a free man who contributed $300. The "Ladies Gunboat Fund" in Savannah, which eventually produced the C.S.S. Georgia, had significant black support.

The number of affluent free blacks in the South grew dramatically in the 1850s, a decade of unprecedented prosperity and continuous economic expansion in the South. In Charleston, 75 whites rented homes from blacks. By 1860, there were 26 free black residents of Nashville who, with no property in 1850, had managed to accumulate net assets of $1,000. They became successful as plantation owners as well as farmers, artisans and skilled craftsmen. By 1860 in Charleston alone they owned $500,000 in property. Perhaps the group that had the strongest vested interest in seeing the South victorious were the black slaveowners. In 1830 approximately 1,556 black slaveowners in the deep South owned 7,188 slaves. About 25% of all free blacks owned slaves. A few of these were men who purchased their family members to protect or free them, but most were people who saw slavery as the best way to economic wealth and independence for themselves.
News of South Carolina's secession from the Union reached the Crescent City on December 21, 1860, and it resulted in several raucous celebrations over the next several days. In this atmosphere, a number of free blacks sent a letter to the editor of the Daily Delta expressing their support for their native state. The letter stated :


... the free men of colored population (native)...love their home, their property, their own slaves, and they are dearly attached to their native land, and they recognize no other country than Louisiana, and care for no other than Louisiana, and they are ready to shed their blood for her defense. They have no sympathy for Abolitionism; no love for the North, but they have plently for Louisiana; and let the hour come, and they will be worthy sons of Louisiana. They will fight for her in 1861 as they fought in 1814 - 15....

The Richmond Howitzers were partly manned by black soldiers. They saw action at 1st Manassas, in addition two black regiments, one free and one slave participated in the battle on behalf of the South.
A black Confederate, George ?, when captured by Federals was bribed to desert to the other side. He defiantly spoke, "Sir, you want me to desert, and I ain't no deserter. Down South, deserters disgrace their families and I am never going to do that."
An unidentified black Winchester resident became a local hero after being jailed and allowed only bread and water because of his support of the South and refusal to work for the Union. The old man was forced to chop wood with an iron ball and chains attached to his arms and legs, but stubbornly vowed to support the Confederacy to his last breath. A Charlottesville newspaper reprinted an interview with James Ward, a slave who fled "Yankeedom" but returned with warnings to his fellow slaves of abuse and racism in Union army camps. He declared he would rather be the slave of "the meanest masters in the South" than to be a free black man in the North : "If this is freedom, give me slavery forever." Spostylvania County free blacks placed themselves and their property at Virginia's disposal in August of 1861, and a black Fairfax County farmer sold twenty-eight acres of his 150-acre farm and donated the money to the state's defense. A Winchester newspaper gleefully reported the outcome when Union raiders carried off nine slaves belonging to a local slaveowner. In Maryland the slaves were offered freedom or return to their owners; they unanimously stated a preference for the Old Dominion, their wives and children and claimed devotion to their masters. Flabbergasted, Unionists "set them on Virginia shore again and the blacks are now home contented and happy, fearing nothing." After two weeks of freedom in Pennsylvania, four Clarke County slaves, disgusted with the North, demanded to be returned to Virginia but were instead sold. Confederate Virginia was a biracial society intertwined with black and white influences. As a minority within a minority, pro-Confederate blacks have received little scholarly research. Numerous Afro-Virginians, free blacks and slaves, were genuine Southern loyalists, not as a consequence of white pressure but due to their own preferences. They are the Civil War's forgotten people, yet their existence was more widespread than American history has recorded. Their bones rest in unhonored glory in Southern soil, shrouded by falsehoods, indifference and historian's censorship.


Not only did Jefferson Davis envision black Confederate veterans receiving bounty lands for their service, there would have been no future for slavery after the goal of 300,000 armed black CSA veterans came home after the war.

Free black musicians, cooks, soldiers and teamsters earned the same pay as white Confederate soldiers.At the Confederate Buffalo Forge in Rockbridge County, Virginia, skilled black workers earned on average three times the wages of white Confederate soldiers and more than most Confederate army officers. ($350 - $600 a year). This was not the case however in the Union army where blacks did not receive equal pay. White soldiers in the Union army received $13 a month and black soldiers received $10 a month, of which $3 was taken for clothing and one ration. They were also given inferior weapons and materials.
Indeed, black Southerners who served the Confederacy have been out of favor with historians, social scientists and other scholars for 150 years. Yet when the Army of Northern Virginia marched into Pennsylvania in 1863, or the Army of Tennessee retreated to Atlanta in 1864, they were not all-white armies, as we have come to imagine them. Instead, thousands of black Southerners marched with them, as servants, nurses, surgeons, assistants, laborers, drivers and even a few in combat roles. Thousands now lie beneath Southern soil in unmarked graves, with no marker for their final resting sites and no Confederate flags to fly above their headstones on Confederate Memorial Day. Why have their experiences been forgotten ? Perhaps one small reason is that during the post-war era the Federal government refused to furnish grave markers for black Confederates. The Federal government would only furnish grave markers for Union, Confederate and black Union soldiers.




Click here to see what one of Robert E. Less's own slave said about him.

Truthly spealing tihs is an interesting link and well worth the effort of clicking on and investigating! I concider Myself a History Buff and I recieved a perspective of the Greatest General that The South ever fieled,Robert E. Lee, that the history books never had touched apon! Again well worth the effort of checking it out!



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Old May 9th, 2008 #2
McKinley
coast to coast WN
 
McKinley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Louisville KY area
Posts: 5,775
McKinley
Default

Good stuff, the link doesn.t work.
__________________
nothing says lovin' like a jew in the oven

Kentckyanna True News

"What do you expect? All we got on this team are a bunch a Jews, spics, niggers, pansies -- and a booger-eatin' moron!"

Tanner Boyle - short stop for the Bad News Bears.
 
Old July 16th, 2019 #3
Sean Gruber
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,465
Sean Gruber
Default Jews and the 1850 U.S. Federal Census Slave Schedules

Here are the names of jews who owned black slaves, according to the 1850 U.S. Federal Census Slave Schedules.

First, read "THE RATIONALE" and "THE RESULT." After that, "THE NAMES."

To make the post you are reading now, I got the list of slave-owning jews from here and added and lightly edited some people's comments there, including one comment by the original poster. (H/T Alex Linder, Kirksville Today, White Wrap Tuesday (2019-07-16). See here for "THE NAMES, Part Two.")

*

THE RATIONALE

In Jewish theology the Negro race (Kushi) are descendants of Ham and they bear the curse that Noah put upon them to be slaves to the Semitic and the White races, who are descended from Noah's other sons, Shem and Japheth.

"Noah, a man of the soil, proceeded to plant a vineyard. When he drank some of its wine, he became drunk and lay naked inside his tent. Ham, the father of Canaan, saw his father naked and told his two brothers outside. But Shem and Japheth took a garment and laid it across their shoulders; then they walked in backward and covered their father's naked body. Their faces were turned the other way so that they would not see their father naked.

"When Noah awoke from his wine and found out what his youngest son had done to him, he said, 'Cursed be Canaan! The lowest of slaves will he be to his brothers.'

"He also said, 'Praise be to the Lord, the God of Shem! May Canaan be the slave of Shem. May God extend Japheth's territory; may Japheth live in the tents of Shem, and may Canaan be the slave of Japheth.'" - Genesis 9:20


THE RESULT

By the year 1800 there were about 2,000 Jews in South Carolina (overwhelmingly Sephardic and settled in Charleston), which was more than in any other U.S. state at that time, and more than any other town, city, or place in North America. Charleston remained the unofficial capital of North American Jewry until about 1830, when the increasing number of Ashkenazi German Jews emigrating to America largely settled in New Orleans, Richmond, Savannah, Baltimore, and the northeast (particularly in Philadelphia and New York City), eventually surpassing the mostly Sephardic Jewish community in Charleston.

Among the founders of Richmond, Virginia's Jewish community were men such as Israel and Jacob I. Cohen, Samuel Myers, Jacob Modecai, Solomon Jacobs, Joseph Marx, Zalma Rehine, and Baruch and Manuel Judah, all slave holders. Following the Revolutionary War, Richmond was a town of some 2000 people, half of whom were slaves. By 1788, 17% of the White population were Jews and all but one of the Jewish householders held at least one slave as a domestic servant, with one Jewish family owning three. While less than 2% of Whites in the United States were slave owners (8% of White households nationally), by 1820 "over 75 percent of all Jewish families in Charleston, Richmond, and Savannah owned slaves, employed as domestic servants; almost 40 percent of all Jewish households in the United States owned one slave or more" according to Jewish historian, Jacob Rader Marcus, in his United States Jewry, 1776-1985, p. 585.

In 1860 the total number of slave owners in the South was 393,975 (including, in Louisiana, some free Negroes). The total number of Whites living in the South in 1860 was 5,582,222. Out of 5,582,222 White Southerners, only 393,975 or 7% owned slaves (this statistic includes Jews), and of those Southern slave owners 5,000 were Jewish, according to The Historical Encyclopedia of World Slavery by Junius P. Rodriguez, professor of history at Eureka College in Eureka, Illinois. Nationwide, the percentage of America's 175,000 Jews who owned slaves in 1860 was almost twice that of White Americans, with over 2.85% (1 out of 40) of individual Jewish Americans owning slaves, compared to less than 1.5% (1 out of 70) of the United States' 26,581,450 White residents.


THE NAMES, Part One

From the 1850 U.S. Federal Census Slave Schedules (alphabetized by last name)

A:

Elias Aaron of District 56-1/2, Rockingham, Virginia: 1 slave
John Aaron of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 50 slaves
John Aaron of Division 3, Dorchester, Maryland: 5 slaves
John T. Aaron of Halifax, North Carolina: 1 slave
J. T. Aaron of Township 19, Tallapoosa, Alabama: 13 slaves
Marcillus Aaron of Division 3, Dorchester, Maryland: 1 slave
Michel Aaron of District 46, Jasper, Georgia: 2 slaves
James C. Aaron of District 46, Jasper, Georgia: 4 slaves
Ruben Aaron of Western Division, Monroe, Mississippi: 2 slaves
Samuel Aaron of Division 3, Dorchester, Maryland: 4 slaves
Absolom Aarons of Lauderdale, Mississippi: 4 slaves
Martha Aarons of Halifax, North Carolina: 7 slaves
A. M. Abraham of Blue, Jackson, Missouri: 1 slave
Bernard Abraham of Division 73, Richmond, Georgia: 7 slaves
Elias Abraham of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 1 slave
Francis Abraham of District 2, Lincoln, Kentucky: 9 slaves
Henry L. Abraham of King William, Virginia: 11 slaves
Jesse A Abraham of Powhatan, Virginia: 13 slaves
Aaron Abrahams of Sumter, Sumter, South Carolina: 1 slave
A. D. Abrahams of District 2, Buckingham, Virginia: 13 slaves
A. H. Abrahams of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 6 slaves
Alexander Abrahams of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Bernardo Abrahams of Division 73, Richmond, Georgia: 2 slaves
Dorothea Abrahams of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 3 slaves
I. Abrahams of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 8 slaves
James Abrahams of Roane, Lafayette, Arkansas: 15 slaves
James A. Abrahams of Livingston, Sumter, Alabama: 5 slaves
John Abrahams of Lynchburg, Campbell, Virginia: 1 slave
Jno. W. Abrahams of District 2, Buckingham, Virginia: 11 slaves
Mordecai Abrahams of King William, Virginia:15 slaves
Nate I. Abrahams of Tennessee Valley, Macon, North Carolina: 3 slaves
Rachael Abrahams of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 6 slaves
_______ Abram of Sauratown, Stokes, North Carolina: 43 slaves
John H Abram of District 34, Greene, Missouri: 2 slaves
Caroline Abrams of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 2 slaves
Elisha Abrams of Edgecombe, North Carolina: 1 slave
George W. Abrams of Eastern Division, Monroe, Mississippi: 7 slaves
H. C. Abrams of Southern District, Pickens, Alabama: 4 slaves
J. P. Abrams of Carrollton, Jefferson, Louisiana: 1 slave
James Abrams of Newberry, South Carolina: 4 slaves
James Abrams of Polk, Rutherford, North Carolina: 1 slave
John Abrams of Laurens, South Carolina: 3 slaves
John A. Abrams of Newberry, South Carolina: 9 slaves
Joseph Abrams of Laurens, South Carolina: 12 slaves
Lydia Abrams of Polk, Rutherford, North Carolina: 5 slaves
Martha Abrams of Newberry, South Carolina: 10 slaves
Perry Abrams of Newberry, South Carolina: 3 slaves
Robt B Abrams of Williamsburg, Williamsburg, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Samueli Abrams of Newberry, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Simon Abrams of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 1 slave
T. Abrams of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 2 slaves
T. M. B. Abrams of Williamsburg, Williamsburg, South Carolina: 1 slave
Thomas Abrams of Newberry, South Carolina: 6 slaves
Thomas Abrams of District 7, Hardin, Tennessee: 2 slaves
W. P. Abrams of Broad River, Rutherford, North Carolina: 13 slaves
Wilche Abrams of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 2 slaves
William Abrams of Newberry, South Carolina: 2 slaves
________ Ackerman of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 2 slaves
Daniel Ackerman of District 1, Logan, Kentucky: 1 slave
Edwin M Ackerman of St Bartholomews Parish, Colleton, South Carolina: 1 slave
Jacob Ackerman of Allen, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Peter J. Ackerman of Hackensack, Bergen, New Jersey: 1 slave
V. P. Ackerman of Washington, Texas: 4 slaves
J. Adler of East Feliciana, Louisiana: 1 slave
James W Adler Coosa, Coosa, Alabama: 2 slaves
M. Adler of Georgetown, Washington, District of Columbia: 2 slaves
S. I. Adler of New Orleans Municipality 1 Ward 1, Orleans, Louisiana: 2 slaves
Sol Albright of Panola, Texas: 6 slaves
Jno. Aron of Van Buren, Union, Arkansas: 1 slave
Sally Aron of Northern District, Pittsylvania, Virginia: 1 slave


B:

Isaac Bachrach of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 1 slave
Jacob Backrack of Ashbys, Fauquier, Virginia: 1 slave
Jacob Baer of Buckeystown, Frederick, Maryland: 2 slaves
Jacob Baer of Middletown, Frederick, Maryland: 3 slaves
Thomas Baer of Northern Division, Bedford, Virginia: 14 slaves
William Baer of District 2, Tippah, Mississippi: 7 slaves
Nicholas J. Baroch of Howard, Anne Arundel, Maryland: 2 slaves
Marion C. Baruch of Division 2, Bath, Kentucky: 6 slaves
Abraham Baum of Cowinjock, Currituck, North Carolina: 4 slaves
Edward Baum of North Banks, Currituck, North Carolina: 1 slave
J. P. Baum of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 3 slaves
Jacob Baum of Princess Anne, Virginia: 9 slaves
Joseph Baum of Cowinjock, Currituck, North Carolina: 5 slaves
Marcus H. Baum of District 11 (upper), Houston, Georgia: 23 slaves
Moses Baum of Northern Division, Marshall, Mississippi: 1 slave
Nathaniel Baum of Northampton, North Carolina: 6 slaves
Norris Baum of North Banks, Currituck, North Carolina: 3 slaves
Peter R. Baum of Division 8, Leon, Florida: 5 slaves
Samuel Baum of Roanoke Island, Currituck, North Carolina: 3 slaves
Solomon Baum of Roanoke Island, Currituck, North Carolina: 11 slaves
Thomas Baum of Mattamuskeet, Hyde, North Carolina: 8 slaves
David Baughman of Noxubee, Mississippi: 2 slaves
Eliza Bauman of St Louis Ward 3, St Louis, Missouri: 1 slave
Hamilton Baughman of District 2, Lincoln, Kentucky: 13 slaves
Jacob Baughman of District 23, Cooper, Missouri: 2 slaves
Jno. Baughman of District 1, Lincoln, Kentucky: 25 slaves
John Baughman of District 9, Buchanan, Missouri: 2 slaves
Cooper Benjamin of Martin, North Carolina: 11 slaves
H. A. Benjamin of West Feliciana, Louisiana: 13 slaves
Jno. Benjamin of District 2, Lincoln, Kentucky: 5 slaves
John Benjamin of Laurens, South Carolina: 8 slaves
Mahaley Benjamin of Laurens, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Philip Benjamin of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 4 slaves
S. Benjamin of Ward 6, East Baton Rouge, Louisiana: 30 slaves
Josiah Bergman of District 1, Ohio, Kentucky: 3 slaves
John Blach of District 6, McNairy, Tennessee: 8 slaves
Morna Blach of Wilcox, Alabama: 2 slaves
Thomas Blach of Northern Division, Randolph, North Carolina: 1 slave
H. Blaum of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 15 slaves
Mary Bolch of Snow Hill, Worcester, Maryland: 1 slave
Moses Bloch of Thompson, Pike, Arkansas: 2 slaves
________ Block of St Louis Ward 2, St Louis, Missouri: 4 slaves
Abraham Block of Washington, Hempstead, Arkansas: 13 slaves
Daniel W. Block of Wilcox, Alabama: 1 slave
E. Block of St Louis Ward 2, St Louis, Missouri: 1 slave
Eleaner Block of District 14, Cape Girardeau, Missouri: 1 slave
Eleazer Block of St Louis Ward 5, St Louis, Missouri: 3 slaves
Eleazer Block of Ashley, Pike, Missouri: 14 slaves
Emanuel Block of St Louis Ward 3, St Louis, Missouri: 24 slaves
Hyman Block of District 19, Clark, Missouri: 2 slaves
J. A. Block of Edgefield, South Carolina: 2 slaves
James Block of Lawrence, Mississippi: 1 slave
Jacob Block of Buffalo, Pike, Missouri: 4 slaves
Joseph Block of Holmes, Mississippi: 5 slaves
Moses Block of New Orleans Municipality 1 Ward 5, Orleans, Louisiana: 1 slave
Phineas Block of St Louis Ward 4, St Louis, Missouri: 4 slaves
Sarah Block of District 1, Madison, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Spot Block of District 8, Haywood, Tennessee: 5 slaves
Susan Block of Western District, Henrico, Virginia: 2 slaves
William H. Block of District 13, Giles, Tennessee: 5 slaves
Z. Block of District 14, Cape Girardeau, Missouri: 4 slaves
A. L. Blome of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 2 slaves
Sol Bloom of Marion, Mississippi: 1 slave
Antoinette Blum of Forsyth, North Carolina: 1 slave
Charles Blum of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 3 slaves
D Blum of Ascension, Louisiana: 1 slave
David Blum of Forsyth, North Carolina: 14 slaves
F. C. Blum of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 16 slaves
Frances R. Blum of Forsyth, North Carolina: 1 slave
G. Blum of Orangeburg, Orangeburg, South Carolina: 1 slave
J. C. Blum of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina 2 slaves
J. Charles Blum of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 12 slaves
James H. Blum of Decatur, Montgomery, Alabama: 15 slaves
John N Blum of Forsyth, North Carolina: 8 slaves
N. Blum of Ascension, Louisiana: 1 slave
Jacob Blume of Memphis Ward 2, Shelby, Tennessee: 2 slaves
Moses Bragam of Sumter, Sumter, South Carolina: 19 slaves
Benjamin Bruch of Laurens, Georgia: 25 slaves
Ephraim Bruch of Caswell, North Carolina: 7 slaves


C:

D. L. M. Canter of St Lukes Parish, Beaufort, South Carolina: 2 slaves*
George Canter of Prince William, Virginia: 1 slave
Henry Canter of Bryantown, Charles, Maryland: 9 slaves
Horatio Canter of District 5, St Mary's, Maryland: 10 slaves
John Canter of Fayette, Texas: 9 slaves
Frank Canter of Bryantown, Charles, Maryland: 11 slaves
L. H. Canter of Bryantown, Charles, Maryland: 4 slaves
Lorn Canter of Bryantown, Charles, Maryland: 4 slaves
May Canter of Bryantown, Charles, Maryland: 2 slaves
Robert Canter of Fayette, Texas: 17 slaves
T. Canter of Bryantown, Charles, Maryland: 1 slave
William Canter of Pleasant Hill, Dallas, Alabama: 1 slave
David W. Cauffman of Cache, St Francis, Arkansas: 2 slaves
William Caufman of Subdivision No 2, Washington, Maryland: 1 slave
Anna C. Caughman of Lexington, Lexington, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Daniel Caughman of Lexington, Lexington, South Carolina: 5 slaves
Emanuel Caughman of Edgefield, South Carolina: 8 slaves
Hilliard Caughman of Lexington, Lexington, South Carolina: 10 slaves
Isaiah Caughman of Lexington, Lexington, South Carolina: 1 slave
James Caughman of District 41, Heard, Georgia: 12 slaves
J. T. Caughman Lexington, Lexington, South Carolina: 1 slave
Martin Caughman of Lexington, Lexington, South Carolina: 9 slaves
Samuel P. Caughman of Lexington, Lexington, South Carolina: 9 slaves
Simeon E. Caughman of Lexington, Lexington, South Carolina: 1 slave
W. F. Caughman of Lexington, Lexington, South Carolina: 8 slaves
Abel Chapman of Newton, Mississippi: 13 slaves
Abram Chapman of Edgefield, South Carolina: 3 slaves
Benjamin Chapman of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Benjamin Chapman of District 5, Sumner, Tennessee: 10 slaves
Benjamin Chapman of Division 18, Putnam, Florida: 11 slaves
Benjamin D. Chapman of Hinds, Mississippi: 5 slaves
Beryle Chapman of Marion, Drew, Arkansas: 3 staves
Byers & Chapman of Louisiana, Chicot, Arkansas: 44 slaves
Coziah Chapman of Sumterville, Sumter, Alabama: 7 slaves
Daniel B. Chapman of District 1, Marion, Florida: 9 slaves
David Chapman of Bucks, Pitt, North Carolina: 20 slaves
David Chapman of District 10, Robertson, Tennessee: 10 slaves
David Chapman of District 2, Warren, Kentucky: 10 slaves
Elias Chapman of Greenville, South Carolina: 5 slaves
Elijah Chapman of Jasper, Crawford, Arkansas: 1 slave
Elizabeth Chapman of Allens Fresh, Cecil, Maryland: 20 slaves
Elizah Chapman of District 15, Liberty, Georgia: 12 slaves
Enoch Chapman of Polecat, Perry, Alabama: 10 slaves
Jacob Chapman of District 43, Nicholas, Virginia: 5 slaves
Jacob Chapman of District 13, Gibson, Tennessee: 7 slaves
James Chapman of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 6 slaves
Jno. R. Chapman of Pensacola, Escambia, Florida: 8 slaves
John G. Chapman of Allens Fresh, Cecil, Maryland: 92 slaves
John L. Chapman of Washington, Mississippi: 107 slaves
Joseph Chapman of Athens, Dallas, Alabama: 14 slaves
Joseph Chapman of Clarke, Alabama: 13 slaves
Lorin Chapman of Livingston, Louisiana: 2 slaves
Michael Chapman of Burke, North Carolina: 1 slave
Micaijah Chapman of Subdivision 90, Warren, Georgia: 2 slaves
Mariam Chapman of District 38, Hall, Georgia: 6 slaves
Nathan Chapman of Campbell, Virginia: 1 slave
Pearcin Chapman of Middletown, Charles, Maryland: 26 slaves
Reuben Chapman of Huntsville, Madison, Alabama: 10 slaves
Reuben Chapman of Livingston and Brewersville, Sumter, Alabama: 25 slaves
Samuel Chapman of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 3 slaves
Samuel Chapman of Sumterville, Sumter, Alabama: 12 slaves
Samuel Chapman of Newberry, South Carolina: 11 slaves
Soloman Chapman of Division 3, Tippah, Mississippi: 1 slave
Solomon Chapman of District 1, Ohio, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Solomon Chapman of Wetumpka, Autauga, Alabama: 3 slaves
Synthin Chapman of Division 60, Monroe, Georgia: 13 slaves
Thomas Chapman of Division 78, Taliaferro, Georgia: 11 slaves
Thomas Chapman of East Feliciana, Louisiana: 46 slaves
William Clein of Division 88, Walton, Georgia: 6 slaves
Daniel Cline of Brazeau, Perry, Missouri: 1 slave
Jacob Cline of Front Royal, Warren, Virginia: 5 slaves
Jacob Cline of Logan, Virginia: 1 slave
John Cline of Cleveland, North Carolina: 9 slaves
John Cline of Lincoln, North Carolina: 10 slaves
Joseph Cline of West Baton Rouge, Louisiana: 1 slave
Margaret Cline of Lafayette, Jefferson, Louisiana: 2 slaves
Matthew Cline of District 5, Davidson, Tennessee: 2 slaves
Michael Cline of District 1, Baltimore, Maryland: 1 slave
Moses Cline of Brazeau, Perry, Missouri: 2 slaves
Solomon Cline of Brazeau, Perry, Missouri: 1 slave
W. A. Cline of Newberry, Newberry, South Carolina: 11 slaves
John M. C. Clitz of Berrys, Montgomery, Maryland: 1 slave
Benjamin L. Coen of Wilkinson, Mississippi: 6 slaves
James Coen of Copiah, Mississippi: 5 slaves
_________ Coffman of District 1, Muhlenberg, Kentucky: 4 slaves
_________ Coffman of District 16, Clinton, Missouri: 1 slave
Absalom Coffman of District 2, Hopkins, Kentucky: 5 slaves
Amas Coffman of Township 19, Tallapoosa, Alabama: 2 slaves
Benjamin Coffman of Subdivision 2, Muhlenberg, Kentucky: 1 slave
D. Coffman of District 2 and a half, Augusta, Virginia: 2 slaves
Daniel Coffman of Subdivision No 2, Washington, Maryland: 4 slaves
Daniel Coffman of Nodaway, Andrew, Missouri: 1 slave
David Coffman of District 21, Harrison, Virginia: 1 slave
David Coffman of District 2, Jessamine, Kentucky: 10 slaves
David C. Coffman of District 49, Page, Virginia: 5 slaves
Dewitt Coffman of District 56, Rockingham, Virginia: 13 slaves
George B. Coffman of District 49, Page, Virginia: 5 slaves
Hannah Coffman of Subdivision 2, Muhlenberg, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Isaac Coffman of District 1, Muhlenberg, Kentucky: 2 slaves
J. Coffman of Saline, Ste Genevieve, Missouri: 52 slaves
Jacob Coffman of District 1, Bedford, Tennessee: 1 slave
Jacob Coffman of Regiment 74, Cherokee, Alabama: 1 slave
James Coffman of District 34, Madison, Alabama: 2 slaves
James D Coffman of District 4, Limestone, Alabama: 6 slaves
John Coffman of Township 19, Tallapoosa, Alabama: 9 slaves
John Coffman of District 24, Hampshire, Virginia: 2 slaves
John Coffman of District 1, Logan, Kentucky: 7 slaves
John Coffman of Saline, Ste Genevieve, Missouri: 25 slaves
John L. Coffman of Subdivision 2, Muhlenberg, Kentucky: 1 slave
Joseph Coffman of District 56, Rockingham, Virginia: 9 slaves
Joseph Coffman of Beauvais, Ste Genevieve, Missouri: 11 slaves
Lot Coffman of Kaw, Jackson, Missouri: 10 slaves
Lovell Coffman of District 1, Dyer, Tennessee: 2 slaves
Marcum M. Coffman of District 4, Limestone, Alabama: 23 slaves
Marshal Coffman of District 8, Giles, Tennessee: 3 slaves
Mary Coffman of District 58, Shenandoah, Virginia: 2 slaves
Ralph Coffman of South of the Yalobusha River, Yalobusha, Mississippi: 13 slaves
Samuel Coffman of District 58, Shenandoah, Virginia: 3 slaves
Sarah Coffman of Western District, Botetourt, Virginia: 13 slaves
Sollm Coffman of District 2, Nelson, Kentucky: 5 slaves
Thomas Coffman of Subdivision 15, Knox, Tennessee: 2 slaves
Albert B. Cohen of St Louis Ward 3, St Louis, Missouri: 1 slave
B. W. Cohen of New Orleans Municipality 1 Ward 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 2 slaves
C. E. Cohen of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 3 slaves
D. lopez Cohen of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 10 slaves
D. D. Cohen of St Andrews, Charleston, South Carolina: 12 slaves
G. P. Cohen of District 9, Camden, Georgia: 17 slaves
Hartwig Cohen of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 3 slaves
H. H. Cohen of District 14, Weakley, Tennessee: 4 slaves
Hyam Cohen of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 12 slaves
J. P. Cohen of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 3 slaves
Isaac Cohen of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 3 slaves
Isaac S Cohen of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 5 slaves
Isabella Cohen of Columbia, Richland, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Jacob Cohen of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 6 slaves
John J Cohen of Division 73, Richmond, Georgia: 2 slaves
Marx Cohen of St Andrews, Charleston, South Carolina: 42 slaves
M. E. Cohen of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 3 slaves
M. M. Cohen of New Orleans Municipality 2 Ward 1, Orleans, Louisiana: 3 slaves
Moses Cohen of of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 4 slaves
Moses A. Cohen of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 6 slaves
Nancy Cohen of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Octavius Cohen of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 10 slaves
Philip Cohen of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Q. Cohen of Wilkinson, Mississippi: 3 slaves
R M Cohen of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Samuel M. Cohen of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 36 slaves
Solomon Cohen of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 23 slaves
Thomas Cohen of Union, South Carolina: 6 slaves
T. J. Cohen of Carrollton, Pickens, Alabama: 10 slaves
Jacob Cohn of Edgefield, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Solomon Cohn of Carrollton, Jefferson, Louisiana: 4 slaves
Jacob Coughman of Edgefield, South Carolina: 6 slaves
Noah F. Coughman of Edgefield, South Carolina: 1 slave

D:

A. O. David of District 1, Scott, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Abraham David of Franklin, Virginia: 13 slaves
Amarinth David of Pointe Coupee, Louisiana: 10 slaves
Amis David of District 1, Fayette, Tennessee: 1 slave
Berry M David of Division 56, Madison, Georgia: 2 slaves
Cordy David of Salem, Clarke, Georgia: 5 slaves
Evander David of Sandy Point, Anson, North Carolina: 6 slaves
F. R. David of District 5, Fayette, Tennessee: 2 slaves
Gilbert David of St Landry, Louisiana: 8 slaves
George David of Ward 10, East Baton Rouge, Louisiana: 3 slaves
George B. David of Sumter, Sumter, South Carolina: 7 slaves
Haden J David of Subdivision 45, Jackson, Georgia: 6 slaves
Henry David of Northern Division, DeSoto, Mississippi: 3 slaves
Henry F. David of District 32, Franklin, Georgia: 9 slaves
Isaac David of Division 56, Madison, Georgia: 1 slave
Isidore David of Bayou Lafourche, Lafourche, Louisiana: 1 slave
Ives David of St Landry, Louisiana: 3 slaves
J. B. David of Avoyelles, Louisiana: 4 slaves
J. C. David of New Orleans Municipality 3 Ward 1, Orleans, Louisiana: 3 slaves
J. L. David of Gretna, Jefferson, Louisiana: 24 slaves
Jacob W David of District 19, Harris, Georgia: 13 slaves
James E David of Marlboro, South Carolina: 13 slaves
James H David of Subdivision 45, Jackson, Georgia: 10 slaves
James M David of Division 56, Madison, Georgia: 1 slave
Jephtha David of District 41, Heard, Georgia: 8 slaves
Jesse David of Marlboro, South Carolina: 13 slaves
John H. David of District 4, Limestone, Alabama: 8 slaves
John H. David of Marlboro, South Carolina: 15 slaves*
John J. David of District 19, Harris, Georgia: 3 slaves
John O. David of Marlboro, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Joseph A David of Chesterfield, Chesterfield, South Carolina: 9 slaves
Joshua David of Marlboro, South Carolina: 22 slaves
Louis David of Natchez, Adams, Mississippi: 1 slave
Marceline David of Pointe Coupee, Louisiana: 3 slaves
Mildred David of Independence, Autauga, Alabama: 8 slaves
Morapett David of Division 56, Madison, Georgia: 8 slaves
Peter David of Division 56, Madison, Georgia: 17 slaves
Rananbesand David of White Oak, Jefferson, Arkansas: 9 slaves
Robert C. David of Athens, Limestone, Alabama: 9 slaves
Samuel David of District 9, Robertson, Tennessee: 2 slaves
Samuel R. David of Nelson, Virginia: 4 slaves
Sarah David of District 5, McNairy, Tennessee: slaves
Seth David of Ward 3, East Baton Rouge, Louisiana: 4 slaves
V. David of New Orleans Municipality 1 Ward 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 8 slaves
W. A. David of District 2, Union, Kentucky: 10 slaves
Welcom David of Marlboro, South Carolina: 5 slaves
William David of Marion, Georgia: 8 slaves
William David of Lumpkin, Stewart, Georgia: 13 slaves
William A. David of Decatur, DeKalb, Georgia: 1 slave
Zelie David of St Martin, Louisiana: 2 slaves
Enoch Davids of Clarke, Alabama: 1 slave
Bindag Davis of North Division, Duplin, North Carolina: 16 slaves
Benjamin Davis of Baltimore Ward 3, Baltimore, Maryland: 1 slave
Benjamin Davis of Buncombe, North Carolina: 8 slaves
Benjamin W. Davis of Regiment 98, Mecklenburg, Virginia: 21 slaves
Caleb Davis of Fairfield, South Carolina: 5 slaves
David Davis of Southern Division, Carroll, Mississippi: 29 slaves
Elijah Davis of Smyrna, Carteret, North Carolina: 9 slaves
Elijah Davis of District 2, Nelson, Kentucky: 13 slaves
Enoch Davis of Lockwoods Folly, Brunswick, North Carolina: 1 slave
Ephraim Davis of District 49, Lincoln, Missouri: 8 slaves
Hannah Davis of Sumter, Sumter, South Carolina: 17 slaves
Isedel Davis of Red River, Texas: 3 slaves
Israel Davis of Henry, Virginia: 3 slaves
Israel P. Davis of Georgia Militia District 985, Paulding, Georgia: 3 slaves
Isaac Davis of Goochland, Virginia: 10 slaves
Isaac Davis of Lumpkin, Stewart, Georgia: 1 slave
Isaac Davis of Hayesville, Franklin, North Carolina: 21 slaves
Isaac I. Davis of Sumter, Sumter, South Carolina: 5 slaves
Isaac N. Davis of Catahoula, Louisiana: 6 slaves
Isaiah Davis of Lamar, Texas: 2 slaves
Jacob Davis of Southern District, Halifax, Virginia: 17 slaves
Jacob Davis of Fairfield, South Carolina: 78 slaves
Job Davis of Ross, Stanly, North Carolina: 23 slaves
Joel H. Davis of Beaufort, Carteret, North Carolina: 11 slaves
Jonathen Davis of Township 21, Tallapoosa, Alabama: 30 slaves
Jonathan Davis of Barataria, Jefferson, Louisiana: 42 slaves
Jordan Davis of Marion, Georgia: 1 slave
Joseph Davis of Owsley, Kentucky: 5 slaves
Joshua Davis of Division 47, Jones, Georgia: 18 slaves
J. S. Davis of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 4 slaves
Julia F. Davis of Marion, South Carolina: 30 slaves
Mathias J. Davis of Mathews, Virginia: 14 slaves
Matthew Davis of Southern Division, Randolph, North Carolina: 7 slaves
Micajah Davis of Northern Division, Bedford, Virginia: 45 slaves
Moses Davis of Rankin, Mississippi: 5 slaves
Moses Davis of Catahoula, Louisiana: 6 slaves
Nathaniel Davis of District 3, Limestone, Alabama: 4 slaves
Nimrod Davis of Lowndes, Mississippi: 30 slaves
Rebecca Davis of District 2, Montgomery, Alabama: 16 slaves
Reuben M. Davis of King William, Virginia: 22 slaves
Ruben B. Davis of Louisa, Virginia: 15 slaves
Samuel Davis of District 6, Maury, Tennessee: 8 slaves
Samuel Davis of Western District, Concordia, Louisiana: 401 slaves
Samul Davis of Warren, Warren, North Carolina: 28 slaves
Saul Davis of River, Dallas, Alabama: 103 slaves
Seth Davis of North Division, Duplin, North Carolina: 17 slaves
Zachariah Davis of Lenoir, North Carolina: 32 slaves
Zachariah Davis of District 19, Bedford, Tennessee: 19 slaves
C. Diamond of Jefferson, Louisiana: 10 slaves
E. L. Diamond of Walnut, Phillips, Arkansas: 11 slaves
Jam. Diamond of District 2, Montgomery, Alabama: 4 slaves
James J. Diamond of Stone Mountain, Decatur, Georgia: 2 slaves
Jno. Diamond of Interior, Escambia, Florida: 1 slave
John Diamond of New Orleans Municipality 3 Ward 1, Orleans, Louisiana: 2 slaves
Robert Diamond of Conecuh, Alabama: 2 slaves
S. Diamond of District 25, Maury, Tennessee: 8 slaves
William Diamond of Cates, Gwinnett, Georgia: 8 slaves
F. C. Dimond of Division 11, Carroll, Georgia: 3 slaves


E:

A. Einstein of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 1 slave
R. Einstein of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 2 slaves
Henry Eleazer of Lexington, Lexington, South Carolina: 19 slaves
Levy Elias of Columbia, Richland, South Carolina: 6 slaves
Simon P. Eliser of Ascension, Louisiana: 1 slave
William Elzer of District 17, Henderson, Tennessee: 19 slaves
Benjamin Emanuel of Memphis Ward 3, Shelby, Tennessee: 2 slaves
Benjamin T. Emanuel of District 17, Talbot, Georgia: 76 slaves
David Emanuel of Atlanta, DeKalb, Georgia: 1 slave
J. Emanuel of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 9 slaves
Joel Emanuel of Marlboro, South Carolina: 16 slaves
M. Emanuel of Vicksburg, Warren, Mississippi: 9 slaves
N. Emanuel of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 3 slaves
Nathan Emanuel of Georgetown, Georgetown, South Carolina: 4 slaves
R. C. Emanuel of Marlboro, South Carolina: 9 slaves
S. Emanuel of Marlboro, South Carolina: 13 slaves
Samuel Emanuel of Jefferson, Mississippi: 13 slaves
Terry Emanuel of Southern Division, Bedford, Virginia: 1 slave
Thomas Emanuel of Marion, South Carolina: 3 slaves
Levi Ezrel of District 11 (lower), Houston, Georgia: 20 slaves


F:

Abraham Fischer of Meramec, St Louis, Missouri: 1 slave
David Fisher of Howard, Missouri: 7 slaves
Felix Fischer of District 2, Boyle, Kentucky: 10 slaves
George J. Fischer of Fredericktown, Frederick, Maryland: 3 slaves
William Fischer of Washington Ward 4, Washington, District of Columbia: 2 slaves
August Fisher of Pointe Coupee, Louisiana: 7 slaves
Daniel Fisher of Cabarrus, North Carolina: 8 slaves
David Fisher of Howard, Missouri: 7 slaves
Elias Fisher of Southern Division, Carroll, Mississippi: 41 slaves
Elijah Fisher of Southern District, Sampson, North Carolina: 9 slaves
Ezekiel Fisher of District 1, Breckinridge, Kentucky: 10 slaves
Isacher S. Fisher of District 2, Boyle, Kentucky: 27 slaves
Israel Fisher of Princess Anne, Virginia: 4 slaves
Jacob Fisher of District 1, Kent, Maryland: 4 slaves
Jacob Fisher of Harris and Ridenhour, Stanly, North Carolina: 1 slave
Jacob Fisher of District 3, Limestone, Alabama: 20 slaves
Jacob Fisher of District 2, Greenup, Kentucky: 4 slaves
Jacob F. Fisher of District 2, Decatur, Tennessee: 10 slaves
John Fisher of Columbia, Richland, South Carolina: 16 slaves
Joseph Fisher of Van Zandt, Texas: 2 slaves
Joseph Fisher of District 12, Callaway, Missouri: 5 slaves
Joshua Fisher of Mulberry, Franklin, Arkansas: 9 slaves
Laban Fisher of District 78, St Charles, Missouri: 1 slave
Levi Fisher of District 17, Wilson, Tennessee: 7 slaves
Michael Fisher of District 18, Bedford, Tennessee: 1 slave
Michael Fisher of District 8, Boone, Missouri: 13 slaves
Miers W. Fisher of Northampton, Virginia: 16 slaves
Samuel Fisher of District 2, Queen Anne's, Maryland: 14 slaves
Samurl Fisher of St James Goose Creek, Charleston, South Carolina: 5 slaves
Samuel Fisher of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 11 slaves
Dr. Samuel B. Fisher of Ashbys, Fauquier, Virginia: 25 slaves
Solomon Fisher of Cabarrus, North Carolina: 1 slave
Solomon Fisher of Peno, Pike, Missouri: 3 slaves
S. W. Fisher of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 3 slaves
Andrew J. Frank of Hill Top, Charles, Maryland: 2 slaves
Austin Frank of Cople, Westmoreland, Virginia: 1 slave
B. M. Frank Western Division, Choctaw, Mississippi: 3 slaves
Fredrick Frank of District 1, Breckinridge, Kentucky: 1 slave
George Frank of South Division, Davidson, North Carolina: 1 slave
H. P. Frank of Western Division, Choctaw, Mississippi: 8 slaves
Jacob Frank of Washington Ward 1, Washington, District of Columbia: 1 slave*
John Frank of Western Division, Monroe, Mississippi: 16 slaves
John Frank of Richland, South Carolina: 12 slaves
Joseph Frank of Maysville, Mason, Kentucky: 2 slaves
M. Frank of Eastern District, St Helena, Louisiana: 1 slave
Maria Frank of Essex, Virginia: 6 slaves
Morna Frank of District 4, St Mary's, Maryland: 15 slaves
Morris Frank of Louisiana, Chicot, Arkansas: 2 slaves
Peter Frank of District 6, Obion, Tennessee: 1 slave
Polly Frank of District 1, Henry, Kentucky: 1 slave
R. J. Frank of Washington, Texas: 4 slaves
Robert Frank of Western Division, Choctaw, Mississippi: 1 slave
Samuel B. Frank of Western Division, Choctaw, Mississippi: 3 slaves
Washington Frank of Northern Division, Bedford, Virginia 5 slaves
William Frank of South Division, Davidson, North Carolina: 1 slave
William Frank of Subdivision 19, Morgan, Tennessee: 1 slave
Benjamin Franks of District 21, Jackson, Alabama: 6 slaves
Brittain Franks of Huntsville, Madison, Alabama: 3 slaves
C. P. Franks of Laurens, South Carolina: 6 slaves
Daniel Franks of Grant, Kentucky: 1 slave
Gabriel Franks of Lowndes, Mississippi: 14 slaves
Hanah Franks of New Bern, Craven, North Carolina: 3 slaves
Jno. O. Franks of New Kent, Virginia: 1 slave
John Franks of Grant, Kentucky: 7 slaves
John A Franks of Western District, De Soto, Louisiana: 1 slave
John M. Franks of Upper Richlands, Onslow, North Carolina: 35 slaves
Lorenzo Franks of Western Division, Wake, North Carolina: 1 slave
Mary Franks of Laurens, South Carolina: 1 slave
Miles Franks of Laurens, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Nehemiah Franks of Laurens, South Carolina: 10 slaves
Pendence Franks of Laurens, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Robert Franks of District 32, Franklin, Georgia: 8 slaves
Robert Franks of Lowndes, Mississippi: 2 slaves
Samuel Franks of Laurens, South Carolina: 33 slaves
Samuel Franks Jr. of Laurens, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Western E. Franks of Prattville, Autauga, Alabama: 2 slaves
Wiley Franks of Division 47, Jones, Georgia: 27 slaves
Wiliam Franks of Western District, De Soto, Louisiana: 5 slaves
William F. Franks of Western Division, Monroe, Mississippi: 3 slaves
Sol Frily of Holmes, Mississippi: 5 slaves
Sol Fruman of District 7, Madison, Tennessee: 43 slaves


G:

M. Galdstein of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 1 slave
________ Gold of Southern Division, Bedford, Virginia: 2 slaves
Daniel Gold of District 16, Frederick, Virginia: 3 slaves
James Gold of District 51-1/2, Rockbridge, Virginia: 3 slaves
Jane Gold of District 51-1/2, Rockbridge, Virginia: 5 slaves
John Gold of Western Division, Monroe, Mississippi: 3 slaves
John Gold of Districts 1-4, Montgomery, Tennessee: 27 slaves
John L. M. Gold of Marlboro, South Carolina: 1 slave
Josiah Gold of District 7, Wilson, Tennessee: 2 slaves
Pleasant Gold of South Division, Smith, Tennessee: 7 slaves
Samuel Gold of South West District, Rockbridge, Virginia: 5 slaves
Thomas E. Gold of District 12, Clarke, Virginia: 14 slaves
William H. Gold of District 16, Frederick, Virginia: 1 slave
William M. Gold of North East District, Rockbridge, Virginia: 4 slaves
George Golds of Raleigh, Wake, North Carolina: 1 slave
M. Goldberg of Louisville District 2, Jefferson, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Charles H. Golding of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 22 slaves
G. M. Goldman of Western District, Tensas, Louisiana: 49 slaves
Michael Goldman of Districts 10 and 11, Grainger, Tennessee: 1 slave
________ Goldsmith of Lafayette, Jefferson, Louisiana: 12 slaves
B H Goldsmith of Bryantown, Charles, Maryland: 4 slaves
E. H. Goldsmith of Coosa, Coosa, Alabama: 5 slaves
Eliza Goldsmith of Allens Fresh, Charles, Maryland: 7 slaves
Elizabeth W. Goldsmith of Baltimore Ward 7, Baltimore, Maryland: 3 slaves
George M. Goldsmith of District 19, Chambers, Alabama: 13 slaves
J. Goldsmith of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 1 slave
John Goldsmith of Southern District, Pickens, Alabama: 1 slave
John B. Goldsmith of District 19, Chambers, Alabama: 22 slaves
Joseph Goldsmith of Regiment 22, Mecklenburg, Virginia: 3 slaves
Margaret Goldsmith of District 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 7 slaves
Mary A. Goldsmith of District 6, Queen Anne's, Maryland: 1 slave
Matthew C. Goldsmith of District 19, Chambers, Alabama: 8 slaves
Morris Goldsmith of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 13 slaves
Nelson Goldsmith of Bullitt, Kentucky: 2 slaves
P. Goldsmith of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 4 slaves
Sam Goldsmith of Shreveport, Caddo, Louisiana: 12 slaves
T. Goldsmith of Division 12, Cass, Georgia: 10 slaves
Thomas Goldsmith of Greenville, South Carolina: 30 slaves
William Goldsmith of Stone Mountain, Decatur, Georgia: 8 slaves
William Goldsmith of Greenville, South Carolina: 20 slaves
William A. Goldsmith of Bryantown, Charles, Maryland: 4 slaves
William H. Goldsmith of District 19, Chambers, Alabama: 33 slaves
Z. H. Goldsmith of District 4, St Mary's, Maryland: 11 slaves
Isadore Grauman of District 2, Fayette, Kentucky: 1 slave
Aaron Green of Culpeper, Virginia: 2 slaves
Aaron Green of District 28, Benton, Alabama: 10 slaves
Aaron Green of Southern Division, DeSoto, Mississippi: 14 slaves
Aban Green of Eastern District, Warwick, Virginia: 21 slaves
Abraham Green of District 39, St Clair, Alabama: 25 slaves
Abraham Green of Liberty, Marion, Missouri: 5 slaves
Abram Green of Division 73, Richmond, Georgia: 6 slaves
Abram Green of Broad River, Rutherford, North Carolina: 4 slaves
Ananias Green of Western Division, Chickasaw, Mississippi: 5 slaves
Asaph Green of Shreveport, Caddo, Louisiana: 11 slaves
Augustus Green of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Benjamin Green of Watauga, Watauga, North Carolina: 7 slaves
Benjamin Green of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 8 slaves
Benjamin Green of District 50, Lee, Georgia: 61 slaves
Benjamin Green of Tyler, Texas: 5 slaves
Benjamin Green of Liberty, Texas: 12 slaves
Benjamine Green of Marietta, Cobb, Georgia: 17 slaves
Birom Green of District 11, Wilson, Tennessee: 2 slaves
Daniel F. Green of District 16, Clinton, Missouri: 4 slaves
David Green of Division 73, Richmond, Georgia: 10 slaves
David Green of Culpeper, Virginia: 12 slaves
David S. Green of Cole, Missouri: 6 slaves
Derias Green of Greenville, South Carolina: 3 slaves
Eleshe Green of Perry, Tennessee: 2 slaves
Elias Green of Cleveland, North Carolina: 1 slave
Elias Green of Goldstones, Gwinnett, Georgia: 8 slaves
Elijah Green of Ledge of Rock, Granville, North Carolina: 6 slaves
Elisha Green of Weston, Platte, Missouri: 9 slaves
Elizabeth W. Green of Columbia, Richland, South Carolina: 43 slaves
Erasmus H. Green of District 1, Owen, Kentucky: 1 slave
Ermin Green of Greenville, Greenville, South Carolina: 10 slaves
Estell Green of District 16, Frederick, Virginia: 8 slaves
Ezekiel Green of Coahoma, Mississippi: 12 slaves
Felix H. Green of Clark, Lafayette, Arkansas: 10 slaves
Georganna Green of Montgomery Ward 2, Montgomery, Alabama: 11 slaves
Ira N. Green of Anderson, Texas: 18 slaves
Irene P. Green of District 16, Frederick, Virginia: 14 slaves
Irven Green of District 757, Macon, Georgia: 9 slaves
Isaac Green of District 27, Cherokee, Alabama: 23 slaves
Isaac Green of Lawrence, Mississippi: 3 slaves
Isabella Green of Howard, Missouri: 13 slaves
Jacob Green of District 1, Caldwell, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Jacob Green of District 27, Cherokee, Alabama: 12 slaves
Jacob Green of Marengo, Alabama: 15 slaves
James Green of Division 1, Darlington, South Carolina: 48 slaves
Jesse Green of Oktibbeha, Mississippi: 10 slaves
Joel Green of Montgomery, North Carolina: 11 slaves
Joel L. Green of Sumter, Sumter, South Carolina: 59 slaves
John Green of District 800, Troup, Georgia: 3 slaves
John Green of Kentucky, Meade, Kentucky: 13 slaves
Joseph Green of District 70, Putnam, Georgia: 3 slaves
Joseph Green of District 6, Bedford, Tennessee: 8 slaves
Joseph T. Green of District 5, Haywood, Tennessee: 27 slaves
Joshua Green of Lowndes, Mississippi: 20 slaves
Joshua Green of Hinds, Mississippi: 3 slaves
Josiah Green of District 1, Montgomery, Alabama: 72 slaves
Julia A. Green of Union, Louisiana: 9 slaves
Juliet Green of Jefferson, Mississippi: 13 slaves
Lemuel Green of Greenville, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Leven Green of District 2, Nelson, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Levi Green of District 46, Jasper, Georgia: 1 slave
Levie Green of Murray, Georgia: 1 slave
Levy Green of Davis, Franklin, North Carolina: 1 slave
Lewis Green of Lowndes, Mississippi: 3 slaves
Mahala Green of District 2, Davidson, Tennessee: 6 slaves
Martha Green of District 16, Frederick, Virginia: 12 slaves
Martin Green of Cumberland, Virginia: 1 slave
Mary Green of Alexandria, Alexandria, Virginia: 1 slave
May A. Green of District 10, Fayette, Tennessee: 3 slaves
Moses Green of Columbus, North Carolina: 1 slave
Moses Green of Hannibal, Marion, Missouri: 2 slaves
Moses B. Green of Southern District, Henry, Alabama: 7 slaves
Moses F. Green of Franklin, Virginia: 4 slaves
Moses P. Green of District 75, Burke, Georgia: 23 slaves
Nathan Green of Ballard, Kentucky: 5 slaves
Nathan P. Green of Timberlakes, Franklin, North Carolina: 8 slaves
Nathaniel T. Green of Nutbush, Warren, North Carolina: 24 slaves
Noah Green of Bertie, North Carolina: 3 slaves
Paul Green of Southern District, Halifax, Virginia: 7 slaves
Rebecca Green of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 6 slaves
Rebecca Green of Warren, Mississippi: 4 slaves
Reuben Green of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Rhodum Green of Township 23 Ward 2, Claiborne, Louisiana: 10 slaves
Samuel Green of District 28, Emanuel, Georgia: 21 slaves
Samuel Green of Subdivision 29, Benton, Alabama: 18 slaves
Samuel Green of District 14, Warren, Tennessee: 9 slaves
Sarah B. Green of Jefferson, Florida: 45 slaves
Semon Green of Smackover, Ouachita, Arkansas: 53 slaves
Simon T. Green of District 17, Williamson, Tennessee: 3 slaves
Solomon Green of District 3, Haywood, Tennessee: 13 slaves
Susanah Green of Williamsburg, Williamsburg, South Carolina: 11 slaves
Theophchus F. Green of Caroline, Virginia: 11 slaves*
Theophilus Green of Copiah, Mississippi: 15 slaves
Thomas Green of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Wynder Green of Liberty, Texas: 3 slaves
Isadore Gustaman of New Orleans Municipality 2 Ward 1, Orleans, Louisiana: 4 slaves

H:

Allen Haims of Subdivision 11, Sussex, Delaware: 1 slave
Mary Haims of District 19, Chambers, Alabama: 4 slaves
William Haims of Division 73, Richmond, Georgia: 10 slaves
Ambrose Hart of District 12, Callaway, Missouri: 16 slaves
Arthur Hart of Ashbys, Fauquier, Virginia: 4 slaves
Augustus W. Hart of Lower District, Chesterfield, Virginia: 1 slave
Bella Hart of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 7 slaves
Benejah Hart of District 23, Cooper, Missouri: 1 slave
Benjamin Hart of Columbia, Richland, South Carolina: 36 slaves
Blanche Hart of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 6 slaves
Cassiel Hart of St James Goose Creek, Charleston, South Carolina: 17 slaves
D. W. Hart of District 20, Bryan, Georgia: 25 slaves
Daniel Hart of Division 2, Santa Rosa, Florida: 13 slaves
David Hart of Marion, Georgia: 13 slaves
David G. Hart of Mississippi, Missouri: 30 slaves
Elias I. Hart of Manatee Settlement, Hillsborough, Florida: 1 slave
Elijah Hart of District 1, Jefferson, Kentucky: 1 slave*
Elizabeth Hart of Division 47, Jones, Georgia: 12 slaves
Felix Hart of District 2, Nelson, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Henry Hart of District 1, Fleming, Kentucky: 14 slaves
Hiram Hart of Division 9, Greene, Tennessee: 4 slaves
Huel J Hart of Olds, Greene, North Carolina: 3 slaves
Isaac Hart of District 30, Sumter, Georgia: 30 slaves
Isaac Hart of Subdivision 23, McMinn, Tennessee: 3 slaves
Isaac Hart of New Orleans Municipality 2 Ward 2, Orleans, Louisiana: 3 slaves
Isaiah D. Hart of Jacksonville, Duval, Florida: 48 slaves
Jacob Hart of Burke, North Carolina: 5 slaves
Jacob Hart of Grayson, Kentucky: 2 slaves
James Hart of St Johns Colleton Parish, Charleston, South Carolina: 30 slaves
James Hart of District 17, Henderson, Tennessee: 28 slaves
James L. Hart of Division 8, Leon, Florida: 23 slaves
Jessee Hart of Olds, Greene, North Carolina: 3 slaves
Joel Hart of Division 66, Oglethorpe, Georgia: 41 slaves
John T. Hart of Choctaw, Alabama: 4 slaves
Jonathan Hart of District 2 and a half, Augusta, Virginia: 13 slaves
Joseph L. Hart of Fairfax, Virginia: 5 slaves
Joseph Hart of Pike, Mississippi: 7 slaves
Lewis Hart of Travis, Texas: 2 slaves
Lewis C. Hart of Stratton Major Parish, King and Queen, Virginia: 8 slaves
Mary Hart of Eastern District, Spotsylvania, Virginia: 45 slaves
Michael Hart of Lynchburg, Campbell, Virginia: 8 slaves
Michael Hart of District 1, Bath, Kentucky: 1 slave
M. S. Hart of Abraham's Plains, Granville, North Carolina: 7 slaves
Nathaniel Hart of District 5, Bedford, Tennessee: 1 slave
Pleasant Hart of Abraham's Plains, Granville, North Carolina: 24 slaves
Rebecca Hart of York, York, South Carolina: 14 slaves
Reuben Hart of Covington, Alabama: 21 slaves
Samuel Hart of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 7 slaves
Samuel Hart of Subdivision 90, Warren, Georgia: 23 slaves
Samuel Hart of Subdivision 2, Lincoln, Tennessee: 11 slaves
Samuel Hart of Louisville District 2, Jefferson, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Sherod L. Hart of Division 2, Santa Rosa, Florida: 5 slaves
Solomon Hart of Osborn Mill, Harris, Georgia: 7 slaves
Solomon Hart of Louisville District 3, Jefferson, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Thomas Hart of Laurens, Georgia: 15 slaves
Thomas Hart of District 137, Greene, Georgia: 22 slaves
William Hart of St Johns Colleton Parish, Charleston, South Carolina: 36 slaves
William Hart of Subdivision 90, Warren, Georgia: 12 slaves
Anthony Hartman of St Mary, Louisiana: 13 slaves
Armsted Hartman of Flemings, Rutherford, Tennessee: 18 slaves
George Hartman of District 55, Roanoke, Virginia: 1 slave
H. T. Hartman of Albemarle, Virginia: 20 slaves
Isaac Hartman of District 47, Pocahontas, Virginia: 1 slave
Jab P. Hartman of Baltimore Ward 4, Baltimore, Maryland: 2 slaves
Jockly Hartman of St Mary, Louisiana: 8 slaves
John Hartman of District 1, Madison, Kentucky: 6 slaves
John M. Hartman of Southern Division, Robeson, North Carolina: 1 slave
Joseph Hartman of District 2, Carroll, Kentucky: 1 slave
Leonise Hartman of St Mary, Louisiana: 15 slaves
Lewis Milton Hartman of Forsyth, North Carolina: 1 slave
Michael Hartman of Vicksburg, Warren, Mississippi: 2 slaves
Peter Hartman of Ashbys, Fauquier, Virginia: 16 slaves
Peter Hartman of Rowan, North Carolina: 1 slave
Samuel Hartman of Louisville District 2, Jefferson, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Sarah Hartman of District 16, Frederick, Virginia: 4 slaves
H. Hartz of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 10 slaves
John H. Hartz of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 1 slave*
A. Hartzog of Lawrence, Mississippi: 18 slaves
A. A. Hartzog of Lawrence, Mississippi: 13 slaves
Abram Hartzog of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 5 slaves
David Hartzog of Hinds, Mississippi: 6 slaves
Francis Hartzog of Division 23, Barbour, Alabama: 1 slave
George Hartzog of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 11 slaves
Henry Hartzog of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 12 slaves
James F. Hartzog of Lawrence, Mississippi: 18 slaves
Margaret Hartzog of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 44 slaves
Philip Hartzog of Ashe, North Carolina: 1 slave
Rebecca Hartzog of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 24 slaves
Samuel Hartzog of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 6 slaves
Francis H. Hartzogg of Copiah, Mississippi: 7 slaves
Waller Hayam of Planters, Phillips, Arkansas: 1 slave
Daniel Haymes of Cuivre, Pike, Missouri: 7 slaves
James Haymes of District 26, Dallas, Missouri: 2 slaves
R. A. Heim of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 2 slaves
Theobald B. Heims of District 12, Clarke, Virginia: 3 slaves
H. Hertzog of Natchitoches, Louisiana: 13 slaves
Marie Hertzog of Natchitoches, Natchitoches, Louisiana: 2 slaves
Jacob Hiam of Lowndes, Mississippi: 13 slaves
Isaac Hiam of District 8, Worcester, Maryland: 6 slaves
Levin Hiam of District 5, Worcester, Maryland: 2 slaves
Moses Hiam of Talladega, Talladega, Alabama: 2 slaves
________ Hiams of District 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 4 slaves
Mary Haims of District 19, Chambers, Alabama: 4 slaves
Henry M. Himes of Western District, Caldwell, Louisiana: 85 slaves
Henry C. W. Hofman of Louisville Ward 7, Jefferson, Kentucky: 3 slaves
John Hofman of Subdivision No 2, Washington, Maryland: 9 slaves
________ Hoffman of Lafayette, Jefferson, Louisiana: 2 slaves
A. W. Hoffman of St Tammany, Louisiana: 1 slave
Anthony Hoffman of District 16, Frederick, Virginia: 1 slave
Charles Hoffman of District 2, Bourbon, Kentucky: 7 slaves
Charles F. Hoffman of Nansemond, Virginia: 10 slaves
Daniel Hoffman of Rowan, North Carolina: 2 slaves
David Hoffman of Campbell, Virginia: 3 slaves
E. Hoffman of Allegany, Maryland: 3 slaves
Elijah Hoffman of Platte, Clay, Missouri: 2 slaves
Elizabeth Hoffman of District 6, Baltimore, Maryland: 1 slave*
F. A. Hoffman of Jefferson, Frederick, Maryland: 4 slaves
Frederick Hoffman of District 58, Shenandoah, Virginia: 1 slave*
George Hoffman of District 78, St Charles, Missouri: 1 slave
George Hoffman of Warrensburg, Johnson, Missouri: 5 slaves
Henry Hoffman of District 1, Fayette, Kentucky: 16 slaves
Henry Hoffman of Bayou and Thibodaux, Lafourche, Louisiana: 4 slaves
Hy B. Hoffman of District 6, Baltimore, Maryland: 3 slaves
Isaac Hoffman of District 69, Warren, Virginia: 1 slave
Jacob Hoffman of District 21, Macon, Alabama: 63 slaves
Jacob Hoffman of Johnson, Union, Arkansas: 9 slaves
James F. Hoffman of West District, Hanover, Virginia: 11 slaves
J. G. Hoffman of District 10, Maury, Tennessee: 5 slaves
Jno. G. Hoffman of Matagorda Island, Calhoun, Texas: 1 slave
John Hoffman of District 2, Kent, Maryland: 2 slaves
John Hoffman of Northern Division, Bedford, Virginia: 3 slaves
John Hoffman of Kentucky, Meade, Kentucky: 1 slave
John Hoffman of South Fork, Clark, Arkansas: 3 slaves
John Hoffman of New Orleans Municipality 1 Ward 2, Orleans, Louisiana: 4 slaves
John J. Hoffman of Allegany, Maryland: 1 slave
Jones B. Hoffman of Monroe, Ouachita, Louisiana: 1 slave
Jules Hoffman of Thibodaux, Lafourche, Louisiana: 1 slave
Mathias Hofman of District 1, Washington, Maryland: 1 slave
Michael Hoffman of District 1, Washington, Maryland: 1 slave
Michel Hoffman of District 1, Fayette, Kentucky: 9 slaves
M. L. Hoffman of District 1, Robertson, Tennessee:13 slaves
Nimrod M. Hoffman of District 58, Shenandoah, Virginia: 1 slave
Peter Hoffman of District 25, Highland, Virginia: 2 slaves
Peter Hoffman of Gaston, North Carolina: 11 slaves
Peter Hoffman of District 78, St Charles, Missouri: 9 slaves
Philip Hoffman of Harpers Ferry, Jefferson, Virginia: 1 slave
S. Hoffman of Columbus, Muscogee, Georgia: 1 slave
S. Owings Hoffman of Baltimore Ward 11, Baltimore, Maryland: 2 slaves
Thomas C. Hoffman of Baltimore Ward 15, Baltimore, Maryland: 1 slave
William Hoffman of District 1, Montgomery, Kentucky: 3 slaves
William Hoffman of District 2, Todd, Kentucky: 1 slave
William C. Hoffman of New Market, Frederick, Maryland: 4 slaves
Willis Hoffman of Kenton, Kentucky: 1 slave
Zachariah Hoffman of Kenton, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Samuel Hoofman of Southern Division, Bedford, Virginia: 5 slaves
Joseph Hufman of District 2, Spencer, Kentucky: 11 slaves
Rebecca Hufman of Northern District, Pittsylvania, Virginia: 8 slaves
Felix Huffman of Culpeper, Virginia: 7 slaves
Isaac Huffman of Madison, Virginia: 1 slave
Jacob Huffman of South Division, Davidson, North Carolina: 1 slave
Leins Huffman of District 21, Macon, Alabama: 31 slaves
Levi Huffman of Burke, North Carolina: 4 slaves
Moses Huffman of Madison, Virginia: 1 slave
Zachariah Huffman of Madison, Virginia: 3 slaves
E. L. Hyams of Natchitoches, Louisiana: 16 slaves
H. L. Hyams of Natchitoches, Louisiana: 57 slaves
H. M. Hyams of Subdivision 13, Rapides, Louisiana: 26 slaves
M. D. Hyams of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 9 slaves
Moses Hyams of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 2 slaves
S. K. Hyams of Natchitoches, Louisiana: 20 slaves
A. Hyman of Township 15 Range 8, Attala, Mississippi: 3 slaves
Bennette Hyman of Martin, North Carolina: 3 slaves
Canaan Hyman of Marion, South Carolina: 12 slaves
Ebenezer Hyman of Martin, North Carolina: 7 slaves
Elisabeth Hyman of Halifax, North Carolina: 28 slaves
Francis Hyman of Division 8, Leon, Florida: 1 slave
George Hyman of Martin, North Carolina: 5 slaves
Heny Hyman of Edgecombe, North Carolina: 9 slaves
Henry Hyman of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 7 slaves
Henry Hyman of District 108, Hancock, Georgia: 5 slaves
Henry A. Hyman of Lynchburg, Campbell, Virginia: 3 slaves
J. Hyman of Louisville District 3, Jefferson, Kentucky: 1 slave
Jesse Hyman of Warrenton, Warren, North Carolina: 1 slave
John Hyman of Martin, North Carolina: 24 slaves
Larry Hyman of Marion, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Needham Hyman of Martin, North Carolina: 12 slaves
Riddick Hyman of District 34, Madison, Alabama: 4 slaves
Samuel Hyman of Martin, North Carolina: 15 slaves
Samuel Hyman of Louisville District 3, Jefferson, Kentucky: 20 slaves
Theophilus Hyman of Martin, North Carolina: 5 slaves
Thomas Hyman of Craven, North Carolina: 5 slaves
William Hyman of Bertie, North Carolina: 8 slaves
William R. Hyman of Martin, North Carolina: 9 slaves
William S. Hyman of Martin, North Carolina: 9 slaves
William T. Hyman of Martin, North Carolina: 9 slaves


I:

Abram Isaac of Subdivision 1, Lincoln, Tennessee: 16 slaves
H. I. Isaac of Welborn, Conway, Arkansas: 2 slaves
Joseph Isaac of Queen Anne, Prince George's, Maryland: 21 slaves
Nancy Isaac of Thompons, Surry, North Carolina: 1 slave
Richard Isaac of District 2, Calvert, Maryland: 2 slaves
Richard W. Isaac of Queen Anne, Prince George's, Maryland: 20 slaves
Samuel Isaac of New Orleans Municipality 2 Ward 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 2 slaves
Elijah Isaacks of Jasper, Texas: 2 slaves
________ Isaacs of District 90, Saline, Missouri: 2 slaves
________ Isaacs of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 2 slaves
A. C. Isaacs of Subdivision 1, Lincoln, Tennessee: 2 slaves
David Isaacs of Howard, Missouri: 13 slaves
Elisha Isaacs of Marion, Kentucky: 11 slaves
George E. Isaacs of St James Goose Creek, Charleston, South Carolina: 12 slaves
Jacob Isaacs of Columbus Ward 1, Lowndes, Mississippi: 3 slaves
John Isaacs of Marion, Kentucky: 2 slaves
John H Isaacs of St James Goose Creek, Charleston, South Carolina: 21 slaves
Louisa Isaacs of Division 1, Oldham, Kentucky: 4 slaves
Nancy Isaacs of Charlottesville, Albemarle, Virginia: 3 slaves
R. Isaacs of District 90, Saline, Missouri: 8 slaves
Samuel Isaacs of District 8, Lincoln, Tennessee: 2 slaves
Thomas Isaacs of Howard, Anne Arundel, Maryland: 1 slave
Zedekiah M. Isaacs of Howard, Anne Arundel, Maryland: 1 slave
________ Israel of Baltimore Ward 3, Baltimore, Maryland: 1 slave
James Israel of District 21, Macon, Alabama: 9 slaves
Susannah Israel of Union, South Carolina: 3 slaves
William Isreal of District 21, Macon, Alabama: 5 slaves


J:

A. Jacob of District 1, Caldwell, Kentucky: 19 slaves
Ann A. Jacob of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 1 slave
Adelard Jacob of Eastern District, St James, Louisiana: 5 slaves
Arnold Jacob of District 1, Caldwell, Kentucky: 19 slaves
Caleb Jacob of Western District, Henrico, Virginia: 2 slaves
Damnisson Jacob of Marietta, Cobb, Georgia: 1 slave
Dorsey Jacob of District 3, Anne Arundel, Maryland: 9 slaves
E. P. Jacob of District 1, Caldwell, Kentucky: 8 slaves
Emile Jacob of Eastern District, St James, Louisiana: 13 slaves
Everard P Jacob of District 1, Caldwell, Kentucky: 8 slaves
Harriet Jacob of District 1, Crittenden, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Harriette Jacob of Northampton, Virginia: 1 slave
Hannah Jacob of District 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 1 slave
Isaac Jacob of District 1, Clark, Kentucky: 9 slaves
J. Jacob of DeWitt, Texas: 5 slaves
James Jacob of District 4, Anne Arundel, Maryland: 3 slaves
John Jacob of Western District, Henrico, Virginia: 9 slaves
John Jacob of St Mary, Louisiana: 10 slaves
John J. Jacob of District 1, Jefferson, Kentucky: 26 slaves
Mahala Jacob of District 44, Ohio, Virginia: 1 slave
Mathew Jacob of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 7 slaves
Mesin Jacob of St John the Baptist, Louisiana: 10 slaves
Richard T. Jacob of District 23, Cooper, Missouri: 12 slaves
Robert C. Jacob of Northampton, Virginia: 15 slaves
Russell Jacob of Loudon, Virginia: 3 slaves
Simon Jacob of District 38, Hall, Georgia: 1 slave
Susan J. Jacob of District 24, Hampshire, Virginia: 6 slaves
Teacklo W. Jacob of Northampton, Virginia: 15 slaves
Tonley R. Jacob of Subdivision 11, Sussex, Delaware: 4 slaves
Wilhelmina Jacob of District 4, Anne Arundel, Maryland: 6 slaves
William Jacob of Northampton, Virginia: 3 slaves
________ Jacobs of District 2, Spencer, Kentucky: 4 slaves
Aaron Jacobs of Southern Division, Bedford, Virginia: 3 slaves
Abram Jacobs of Galveston, Galveston, Texas: 2 slaves
Alfred Jacobs of Districts 2 and 5, Coffee, Tennessee: 3 slaves
Amey Jacobs of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 9 slaves
Arthur Jacobs of St Georges Parish, Accomack, Virginia: 4 slaves
B. I. Jacobs of Wilmington, New Hanover, North Carolina: 1 slave
Benjamin Jacobs of Orange, Virginia: 7 slaves
Benjamin Jacobs of Craven, North Carolina: 1 slave
Benjamin Jacobs of Person, North Carolina: 7 slaves
Benjamin F. Jacobs of Cuivre, Pike, Missouri: 3 slaves
Betsey Jacobs of Loudon, Virginia: 2 slaves
Bing Jacobs of District 2, Mason, Kentucky: 4 slaves
C. Jacobs of Northern Division, DeSoto, Mississippi: 7 slaves
C. A. Jacobs of New Orleans Municipality 2 Ward 4, Orleans, Louisiana: 7 slaves
C. A. Jacobs of Natchitoches, Louisiana: 25 slaves
C. W. Jacobs of Berlin, Worcester, Maryland: 12 slaves
Clinton Jacobs of Big Spring, Rutherford, Tennessee: 3 slaves
Daniel M. Jacobs of Lincoln, North Carolina: 1 slave
E. Jacobs of New Orleans Municipality 3 Ward 1, Orleans, Louisiana: 4 slaves
Edmund Jacobs of Northampton, North Carolina: 58 slaves
Edward Jacobs of District 8, Anne Arundel, Maryland: 10 slaves
Edward B. Jacobs of District 69, Warren, Virginia: 15 slaves
Elias Jacobs of District 5, Claiborne, Mississippi: 9 slaves
Elijah Jacobs of Person, North Carolina: 18 slaves
Elissa Jacobs of Southern Division, Bedford, Virginia: 1 slave
Ferdinand Jacobs of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 3 slaves
Floyd J. Jacobs of District 29, Kanawha, Virginia: 1 slave
G. & C. Jacobs of St Charles, Louisiana: 220 slaves
George Jacobs of District 4, Carroll, Maryland: 17 slaves
Hansbury Jacobs of Subdivision 11, Sussex, Delaware: 9 slaves
Harrison Jacobs of Alexandria, Alexandria, Virginia: 1 slave
Henry Jacobs of Fairfield, South Carolina: 1 slave
Henry Jacobs of District 3, Marshall, Tennessee: 1 slave
Henry Jacobs of Nacogdoches, Texas: 6 slaves
Ignatius Jacobs of Catoctin, Frederick, Maryland: 10 slaves
Isaac Jacobs of Princess Anne, Virginia: 7 slaves
James Jacobs of District 2, Mason, Kentucky: 8 slaves
James M. Jacobs of 3rd Election & 2nd Centers District, Harford, Maryland: 8 slaves
Jane Jacobs of Wilmington, New Hanover, North Carolina: 2 slaves
Jeremiah Jacobs of District 4, Limestone, Alabama: 3 slaves
Jerry Jacobs of Districts 2 and 5, Coffee, Tennessee: 20 slaves
John Jacobs of District 7, Bedford, Tennessee: 6 slaves
John Jacobs of Princess Anne, Virginia: 7 slaves
John Jacobs of Greenville, South Carolina: 7 slaves
John A. Jacobs of District 2, Boyle, Kentucky: 6 slaves
John J. Jacobs of Louisville District 3, Jefferson, Kentucky: 9 slaves
Joseph Jacobs of District 8, Frederick, Maryland: 2 slaves
Joseph Jacobs of District 52, Lincoln, Georgia: 13 slaves
Joseph Jacobs of Fairfax, Virginia: 2 slaves
Joseph R. Jacobs of District 19, Maury, Tennessee: 4 slaves
Josiah Jacobs of District 41, Heard, Georgia: 1 slave
Julia Jacobs of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Kerrdle M. Jacobs of District 1, Dorchester, Maryland: 4 slaves
Learcus Jacobs of Smith, Dallas, Arkansas: 4 slaves
Lemuel Jacobs of Greenville, South Carolina: 5 slaves
Lewis Jacobs of District 2, Mason, Kentucky: 7 slaves
Luellen Jacobs of Princeton, Dallas, Arkansas: 9 slaves
Mary Jacobs of Ray, Missouri: 9 slaves
Myer Jacobs of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 6 slaves
Mordecai Jacobs of Copiah, Mississippi: 5 slaves
N. M. Jacobs of Front Royal, Warren, Virginia: 3 slaves
Newman M. Jacobs of Front Royal, Warren, Virginia: 3 slaves
Permelia Jacobs of Nelson, Virginia: 16 slaves
Peter Jacobs of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 4 slaves
Richard Jacobs of Greenville, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Samuel Jacobs of Person, North Carolina: 4 slaves
Samuel Jacobs of Baltimore Ward 15, Baltimore, Maryland: 1 slave
Sarah Jacobs of Ray, Missouri: 4 slaves
Sech Jacobs of District 8, Randolph, Georgia: 1 slave
Solomon D. Jacobs of Knoxville, Knox, Tennessee: 11 slaves
T. L. Jacobs of Paducah and Suburbs, McCracken, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Thomas Jacobs of Subdivision 11, Sussex, Delaware: 7 slaves
Thomas Jacobs of Division 36, Gwinnett, Georgia: 4 slaves
Thomas Jacobs of West Feliciana, Louisiana: 1 slave
Thomas W. Jacobs of District 46, Lafayette, Missouri: 4 slaves
W. Jacobs of District 1, Scott, Kentucky: 7 slaves
W. A. Jacobs of District 62, New Madrid, Missouri: 1 slave
William Jacobs of Eastern District, Stafford, Virginia: 4 slaves
William Jacobs of Greenville, South Carolina: 39 slaves
William Jacobs of Hardeman, Tennessee: 7 slaves
William Jacobs of District 2, Harrison, Kentucky: 9 slaves
William Jacobs of St Mary, Louisiana: 23 slaves
William Jacobs of Orange, Virginia: 5 slaves
William Jacobs of Harris, Texas: 1 slave
William B. Jacobs of Middlesex, Virginia: 1 slave
William E. Jacobs of St Georges Parish, Accomack, Virginia: 7 slaves
William K. Jacobs of Subdivision 11, Sussex, Delaware: 2 slaves
William M Jacobs of Ray, Missouri: 2 slaves
William P. Jacobs of Culpeper, Virginia: 3 slaves
Willie Jacobs of Northampton, North Carolina: 3 slaves
J. Jacobson of Monroe, Alabama: 1 slave
J. Jacobson of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 3 slaves
Moses L. Jacobson of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 4 slaves
E. Jonas of New Orleans Municipality 2 Ward 4, Orleans, Louisiana: 2 slaves
George Jonas of Subdivision 10, Greene, Tennessee: 1 slave
Jno. A. Jonas of York, Virginia: 7 slaves
John W. Jonas of Western District, De Soto, Louisiana: 8 slaves
Nancy Jonas of St Lukes Parish, Southampton, Virginia: 13 slaves
Samuel Jonas of Amelia, Virginia: 50 slaves
Wiley K. Jonas of Columbia, Georgia: 4 slaves
Eliza Judah of Western District, Henrico, Virginia: 1 slave


K:

John Kahn of Subdivision 26, Effingham, Georgia: 3 slaves
Fred C. Kauffman of St Landry, Louisiana: 4 slaves
F. S. Kauffman of District 1, Lincoln, Kentucky: 2 slaves
John Kauffman of Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge, Louisiana: 4 slaves
Manuel Kaufman of Western District, Carroll, Louisiana: 3 slaves
Martin B. Kaufman of District 16, Frederick, Virginia: 7 slaves
P. Kaufman of Pointe Coupee, Louisiana: 37 slaves
Michel King of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Esther Klein of Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia: 5 slaves
John A. Klein of Vicksburg, Warren, Mississippi: 25 slaves
John Klene of Baltimore Ward 16, Baltimore, Maryland: 3 slaves
________ Kline of District 29, Kanawha, Virginia: 15 slaves
Anthony M. Kline of District 16, Frederick, Virginia: 1 slave
Celestine Kline of Ascension, Louisiana: 8 slaves
Daniel Kline of District 29, Kanawha, Virginia: 8 slaves
Elizabeth Kline of Howard, Missouri: 3 slaves
Jacob Kline of District 17, Cedar, Missouri: 4 slaves
James A. Kline of Districts 10 and 11, Grainger, Tennessee: 17 slaves
John C. Kline of Western District, Tensas, Louisiana: 34 slaves
Mary Kline of St Louis Ward 4, St Louis, Missouri: 14 slaves
N. E. Kline of Warren, Mississippi: 41 slaves
Samuel Kline of Columbus Ward 2, Lowndes, Mississippi: 3 slaves
Seth Kline of Wilkinson, Mississippi: 3 slaves
William Kline of Hagerstown, Washington, Maryland: 1 slave
Frederick Klooz of Louisville District 1, Jefferson, Kentucky: 1 slave
A. Klotz of Rapides, Louisiana: 3 slaves
Abraham D. Klotz of Alexandria, Alexandria, Virginia: 6 slaves
John P. Klotz of District 143, Greene, Georgia: 2 slaves
Caleb Klutts of Rowan, North Carolina: 3 slaves
Charles Klutts of School District 30, Rowan, North Carolina: 2 slaves
George Klutts of Cabarrus, North Carolina: 4 slaves
James Klutts of Rowan, North Carolina: 1 slave
Leonard Klutts of Rowan, North Carolina: 1 slave
Margaret Klutts of Cabarrus, North Carolina: 1 slave
Moses Klutts of Cabarrus, North Carolina: 1 slave
Raisa Klutts of Cabarrus, North Carolina: 4 slaves
Tobias Klutts of Cabarrus, North Carolina: 2 slaves
Jacob Klutz of Watkinsville, Clarke, Georgia: 8 slaves
Hardy Koen of District 80, St Francois, Missouri: 6 slaves
Adam Kuhn of District 3, Brooke, Virginia: 1 slave
Edward Kuhn of District 21, Maury, Tennessee: 13 slaves
Henry Kuhn of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 3 slaves
Ro H. Kuhn of Henrico, Virginia: 1 slave
William Kuhn of Petersville, Frederick, Maryland: 4 slaves
Saul Kukland of Kershaw, South Carolina: 16 slaves

[Names continued in next post, here.]
__________________
No jews, just right

Less talk, more action

Last edited by Sean Gruber; July 16th, 2019 at 04:40 PM. Reason: added URL; corrections
 
Old July 16th, 2019 #4
Sean Gruber
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,465
Sean Gruber
Default

[Continued from previous post here.]

THE NAMES, Part Two

L:

F. W. Lavey of El Dorado, Union, Arkansas: 1 slave
George W. Lavin of District 1, Baker, Georgia: 1 slave
Joe Lavine of Natchitoches, Louisiana: 1 slave
Samuel Lavins of Portsmouth, Norfolk, Virginia: 1 slave
William C. Lavy of Harrison, Texas: 45 slaves
B. D. Lazarus of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 8 slaves
G. Lazarus of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolin: 3 slaves
James M. Lazarus of Franklin, Mississippi: 2 slaves
Joshua Lazarus of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 10 slaves
Penolepe Lesurce of Northern Division, Marshall, Mississippi: 10 slaves
William Lazarus of Natchez, Adams, Mississippi: 5 slaves
________ Leavens of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 3 slaves
A. Leavens of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 1 slave
William A. Leavey of District 1, Fayette, Kentucky: 13 slaves
John L. Leavit of Gloucester, Virginia: 8 slaves
William A. Leavit of Gloucester, Virginia: 28 slaves
William F. Leavit of Gloucester, Virginia: 5 slaves
William R. Leavit of Gloucester, Virginia: 5 slaves
Levi Leavitt of Mobile, Alabama: 5 slaves
Irington L Leavitt of District 1, Christian, Kentucky: 1 slave
L. L. Leavitt of District 1, Christian, Kentucky: 9 slaves
George Lehman of District 2, Warren, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Henry Lehman of Montgomery Ward 3, Montgomery, Alabama: 2 slaves
Henry R. Lehman of Forsyth, North Carolina: 2 slaves
John P. Leavy of District 2, Franklin, Kentucky: 6 slaves
Lewis Levaey of Western District, Floyd, Virginia: 7 slaves
Daniel Levan of Louisville District 2, Jefferson, Kentucky: 1 slave
G. G. Levan of District 1, Hopkins, Kentucky: 1 slave
Leonidas W Levan of Montgomery, Tennesse: 21 slaves
S. W. Leve of Kershaw, South Carolina: 1 slave
Levee Steam Cotton Press of New Orleans Municipality 3 Ward 3, Louisiana: 63 slaves
________ Leven of District 8, Shelby, Tennessee: 2 slaves
B. Levens of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 3 slaves
Thomas Levens of Western District, Franklin, Louisiana: 23 slaves
Aaron B. Levett of District 81, Thomas, Georgia: 2 slaves
Catharine Levett of District 81, Thomas, Georgia: 4 slaves
James C. Levett of District 68, Burke, Georgia: 17 slaves
Lancy Levett of Division 60, Monroe, Georgia: 5 slaves
Normand Levett of District 81, Thomas, Georgia: 2 slaves
Thomas Levett of District 40, St Clair, Alabama: 6 slaves
Clifton Levey of Howard, Missouri: 18 slaves
Henry Levey of Raleigh, Wake, North Carolina: 1 slave
A. Levi of East Feliciana, Louisiana: 4 slaves
B. Levi of St Mary, Louisiana: 2 slaves
Allen Levi of Lowndes, Lowndes, Alabama: 13 slaves
Burdette Levi of Louisville Ward 8, Jefferson, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Elias Levi of Louisville Ward 8, Jefferson, Kentucky: 1 slave
Hugh M. Levi of District 2, Harrison, Kentucky: 2 slaves
J. A. Levi of Covington, Kenton, Kentucky: 1 slave
James Levi of District 19-1/2, Chambers, Alabama: 3 slaves
Joel Levi of Sabine, Louisiana: 1 slave
Louis Levi of Glasgow, Barren, Kentucky: 1 slave
M. Levi of Louisville District 3, Jefferson, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Mandarille Levi of Talladega, Talladega, Alabama: 3 slaves
Rice W. Levi of District 12, Clarke, Virginia: 2 slaves
Sarah Levi of District 2, Harrison, Kentucky: 4 slaves
Soloman Levi of Liberty, Clay, Missouri: 11 slaves
Tenauld Levi of New Orleans Municipality 2 Ward 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 2 slaves
Theadore Levi of Talladega, Talladega, Alabama: 2 slaves
Thomas Levi of Davidson, Tennessee: 4 slaves
Willis Levi of Louisville Ward 8, Jefferson, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Andrew Levien of Franklin, Virginia: 2 slaves
M. Levien of District 1, Christian, Kentucky: 4 slaves
Jacob Levin of Columbia, Richland, South Carolina: 2 slaves
John Y. Levin of Division 2, Garrard, Kentucky: 9 slaves
Lipman T. Levin of Columbia, Richland, South Carolina: 1 slave
S. Levin of District 6, Weakley, Tennessee: 17 slaves
Joseph Levine of District 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 1 slave
Emanuel Levins of Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, Virginia: 2 slaves
Jesse Levins of District 41, Heard, Georgia: 3 slaves
Robert Levins of District 41, Heard, Georgia: 1 slave
Abram Levy of Hamburg, Edgefield, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Archy Levy of District 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 1 slave
Ash Levy of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 2 slaves
Elias Levy of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 10 slaves
H. Levy of Shreveport, Caddo, Louisiana: 1 slave
H. C. Levy of District 6, Gibson, Tennessee: 13 slaves
H. P. Levy of Grand Gulf, Claiborne, Mississippi: 3 slaves
Hyman Levy of Louisa, Virginia: 3 slaves
Isaac Levy of Jasper, Mississippi: 3 slaves
Isaac Levy of Big Rock, Pulaski, Arkansas: 1 slave
Jacob A. Levy of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 3 slaves
James Levy of Division 12, Gordon, Georgia: 7 slaves
Jane Levy of Kershaw, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Jonas Levy of Little Rock, Pulaski, Arkansas: 1 slave
Jonathan Levy of District 9, Buchanan, Missouri: 1 slave
Jos. Levy of Choctaw, Alabama: 3 slaves
L. A. Levy of District 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 2 slaves
L. L. Levy of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 7 slaves
Lewis Levy of Columbia, Richland, South Carolina: 6 slaves
Lewis Levy of Division 73, Richmond, Georgia: 3 slaves
Lewis Levy of Fayetteville, Cumberland, North Carolina: 1 slave
Lewis B. Levy of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 2 slaves
M. Levy of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 2 slaves
M. Levy of Lexington, Holmes, Mississippi: 1 slave
M. A. Levy of Memphis Ward 4, Shelby, Tennessee: 1 slave
Mayer Levy of Pointe Coupee, Louisiana: 3 slaves
Meyer Levy of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 4 slaves
Moses Levy of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 13 slaves
Nathan L. Levy of Amelia, Virginia: 5 slaves
Raymond Levy of Kershaw, South Carolina: 10 slaves
S. B. Levy of Kershaw, South Carolina: 2 slaves
S. C. Levy of District 6, Gibson, Tennessee: 12 slaves
Samuel Levy of Division 73, Richmond, Georgia: 2 slaves
Samuel Levy of District 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 1 slave
Samuel Levy of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 5 slaves
Sarah Levy of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Simon Levy of District 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 1 slave
U.P. Levy of Albemarle, Virginia: 14 slaves
Z. Levy of Newberry, Newberry, South Carolina: 2 slaves
John C. Libman of District 19, Chambers, Alabama: 5 slaves
L. Lipman of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 1 slave
Samuel Lipman of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 4 slaves
William Lipman of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 1 slave
Joseph Lippman of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 4 slaves
John Livine of Nottoway, Virginia: 2 slaves
K. Loew of New Orleans Municipality 1 Ward 7, Orleans, Louisiana: 4 slaves
Abram Lowe of Division 2, Santa Rosa, Florida: 1 slave
Artemas Lowe of Edgefield, South Carolina: 17 slaves
Benjamin T. Lowe of Waverly Hall, Harris, Georgia: 103 slaves
Cader W. Lowe Division 47, Jones, Georgia: 19 slaves
Cicero F. Lowe of South Division, Davidson, North Carolina: 12 slaves
Curtis G. Lowe of Subdivision 90, Warren, Georgia: 31 slaves
Elizabeth Lowe of District 62, Morgan, Georgia: 9 slaves
Figuers Lowe of Madison, Mississippi: 107 slaves
Henry Lowe of District 5, Queen Anne's, Maryland: 1 slave
Henry Lowe of Oktibbeha, Mississippi: 29 slaves
Henry H. Lowe of Ellerslie, Harris, Georgia: 100 slaves
Isaac Lowe of Lincoln, North Carolina: 10 slaves
Isaiah Lowe of District 21, Dade, Georgia: 1 slave
J. Lowe of Division 20, Crawford, Georgia: 20 slaves
James P. Lowe of Panhandle, Stewart, Georgia: 14 slaves
Jesse Lowe of Lafayette, Mississippi: 15 slaves
John Lowe of Division 47, Jones, Georgia: 33 slaves
John Lowe of Sumterville, Sumter, Alabama: 39 slaves
John Lowe of Madison, Mississippi: 225 slaves
John H. Lowe of High Shoal, Clarke, Georgia: 13 slaves
John H. Lowe of Scull Shoal, Clarke, Georgia: 22 slaves
Jno. H Lowe of Piscataway, Prince George's, Maryland: 23 slaves
Kittma Lowe of St Michaels, Talbot, Maryland: 8 slaves
Marable Lowe of District 14, Robertson, Tennessee: 8 slaves
Minna Lowe of Covington, Mississippi: 6 slaves
Neri Lowe of District 1, Wilson, Tennessee: 31 slaves
Pleasant Lowe of Columbia, Richland, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Ralph Lowe of Barren Creek, Somerset, Maryland: 11 slaves
Sarah Lowe of Hickman, Tennessee: 7 slaves
Stephen Lowe of Madison, Mississippi: 32 slaves
Susanah Lowe of District 1, Baltimore, Maryland: 8 slaves
Thomas Lowe of Queen Anne, Prince George's, Maryland: 6 slaves
William Lowe of Division 47, Jones, Georgia: 22 slaves
William Lowe of District 86, Upson, Georgia: 24 slaves
William S. Lowe of Big Spring, Rutherford, Tennessee: 1 slave
William W. Lowe of St Michaels, Talbot, Maryland: 19 slaves
Willis Lowe of Hinds, Mississippi: 16 slave
Ben Lubman of Middletown, Charles, Maryland: 19 slaves
William Lubman of Shelby, Alabama: 8 slaves
Jacob C. Lyons of Columbia, Richland, South Carolina: 4 slaves


M:

Hiram Macabee of Spartanburg, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Gamern C Macabee of Subdivision 15, Knox, Tennessee: 38 slaves
Isaac Macabee of District 13, Jefferson, Tennessee: 9 slaves
Lemuel J. Macabee of District 13, Jefferson, Tennessee: 7 slaves
Milo Macabee of Subdivision 31, Knox, Tennessee: 2 slaves
Silas Macabee of District 6, Coffee, Tennessee: 6 slaves
Philip Maher of Western District, Madison, Louisiana: 84 slaves
Isaac Mahers of Division 73, Richmond, Georgia: 3 slaves
Joshua Marcus of Fanning, Autauga, Alabama: 2 slaves
Morris Marcus of Subdivision 94, Wilkes, Georgia: 2 slaves
S. Marcus of District 699, Troup, Georgia: 26 slaves
William N. Marcus of Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia: 4 slaves
Ann P. Marks of District 1, Montgomery, Alabama: 33 slaves
Balthazar Marks of St Landry, Louisiana: 5 slaves
David D. Marks of District 1, Daviess, Kentucky: 1 slave
Elias Marks of Richland, South Carolina: 16 slaves
Elisha S. Marks District 1, Daviess, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Ester B. Marks of District 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 13 slaves
E. W. Marks of Selma, Dallas, Alabama: 7 slaves
Frances Marks of Columbia, Richland, South Carolina: 14 slaves
Gerard Marks of St Landry, Louisiana: 3 slaves
Isaac Marks of District 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 2 slaves
James Marks of Shreveport, Caddo, Louisiana: 71 slaves
Jno H. Marks of Prince George, Virginia: 30 slaves
Joseph Marks of St Landry, Louisiana: 1 slave
Joseph B. Marks of Harrison, Mississippi: 4 slaves
Lewis B. Marks of District 11, Giles, Tennessee: 17 slaves
Louis Marks of St Landry, Louisiana: 3 slaves
Paul Marks of Montgomery Ward 1, Montgomery, Alabama: 1 slave
R. I. Marks of Negro Heel, Harris, Georgia: 12 slaves
S. Marks of Petersburg, Petersburg, Virginia: 15 slaves
Samuel Marks of District 3, Brooke, Virginia: 1 slave
Simon Marks of St Landry, Louisiana: 31 slaves
Styres Mark of District 4, Bedford, Tennessee: 6 slaves
William M. Marks of District 1, Montgomery, Alabama: 134 slaves
Alexander Marx of Lower District, Chesterfield, Virginia: 5 slaves
Charles Marx of Lower District, Chesterfield, Virginia: 57 slaves
Francis Marx of Charlotte, Charlotte, Virginia: 1 slave
Mory Marx of Lawrence, Mississippi: 3 slaves
Moses Marx of Lawrence, Mississippi: 1 slave
Samuel Marx of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 3 slaves
A. Mayer of Lancaster, South Carolina: 11 slaves
Andrew Mayer of Bastrop, Texas: 3 slaves
Charles Mayer of Iberville, Louisiana: 17 slaves
D. Mayer of St Landry, Louisiana: 7 slaves
E. A. Mayer of Limestone, Texas: 2 slaves
George Mayer of Newberry, South Carolina: 6 slaves
George Mayer of Lexington, Lexington, South Carolina: 34 slaves
Godlieb Mayer of Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia: 1 slave
Goodwin Mayer of District 18, Maury, Tennessee: 1 slave
Jacob Mayer of Lexington, Lexington, South Carolina: 16 slaves
Jacob Mayer of Lafayette, Jefferson, Louisiana: 1 slave
John Mayer of Lexington, Lexington, South Carolina: 12 slaves
John G. Mayer of St Helena, Beaufort, South Carolina: 12 slaves
Louis Mayer of St Landry, Louisiana: 6 slaves
Michael Mayer of Pointe Coupee, Louisiana: 9 slaves
Michel Mayer of St Landry, Louisiana: 67 slaves
Onezime Mayer of St Landry, Louisiana: 5 slaves
Otto Mayer of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Piety Mayer of Northern Division, Marshall, Mississippi: 1 slave
R. R. Mayer of District 7, Robertson, Tennessee: 1 slave
Thomas A. Mayer of Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia: 7 slaves
V. Mayer of Iberville, Louisiana: 5 slaves
Valery Mayer of St Landry, Louisiana: 8 slaves
William Mayer of Raleigh, Shelby, Tennessee: 2 slaves
William P. Mayer of Division 1, Taylor, Kentucky: 5 slaves
A. G. Mayers of Paulding, Jasper, Mississippi: 3 slaves
E. L. Mayers of Lindsey, Benton, Missouri: 8 slaves
George Mayers of District 56, Rockingham, Virginia: 1 slave
George W. Mayers of Subdivision 1, Lincoln, Tennessee: 1 slave
Henry W. Mayers of Fort Smith, Crawford, Arkansas: 1 slave
James Mayers of St Landry, Louisiana: 1 slave
Massey Mayers of Beat 4, Clarke, Mississippi: 8 slaves
Michael Mayers of Fort Smith, Crawford, Arkansas: 2 slaves
Robert H. Mayers of District 4, Bedford, Tennessee: 16 slaves
R. N. Mayers of District 11, Sumner, Tennessee: 18 slaves
James F. O. Mear of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 23 slaves
Bethel Mears of Cape Fear South West Side, Bladen, North Carolina: 12 slaves
Levi Mears of Cape Fear South West Side, Bladen, North Carolina: 15 slaves
Maria Meier of Boonville, Cooper, Missouri: 21 slaves
William Meier of Washington, Jackson, Missouri: 6 slaves
Anselm D. Meyer of District 2, Boyle, Kentucky: 12 slaves
Benjamin F. Meyer of Marion, Florida: 22 slaves
Charles Meyer of Thibodaux, Lafourche, Louisiana: 2 slaves
Harris Meyer of Bayou and Thibodaux, Lafourche, Louisiana: 3 slaves
Jean Meyer of District 2, Assumption, Louisiana: 8 slaves
John D. Meyer of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 1 slave
Louis Meyer of Catahoula, Louisiana: 3 slaves
Melanie Meyer of New Orleans Municipality 1 Ward 5, Orleans, Louisiana: 1 slave
Morris Meyer of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 3 slaves
Rachel Meyer of District 11, Sumner, Tennessee: 7 slaves
Alexander Meyers of Millersburgh, Rutherford, Tennessee: 3 slaves
Cole Jacob Meyers of District 9, Berkeley, Virginia: 9 slaves
E. J. Meyers of Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia: 4 slaves
George Meyers of District 78, St Charles, Missouri: 16 slaves
Henry Meyers of Division 73, Richmond, Georgia: 5 slaves
J. F. Meyers of District 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 2 slaves
Jacob Meyers of District 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 3 slaves
John Meyers of District 2, Pendleton, Kentucky: 5 slaves
John G Meyers of Smithfield, Jefferson, Virginia: 4 slaves
John H. Meyers of Louisville District 2, Jefferson, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Little B. Meyers of St Peters Parish, Beaufort, South Carolina: 9 slaves
M. H. Meyers of District 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 1 slave
R. Meyers of District 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 3 slaves
William Meyers of District 78, St Charles, Missouri: 3 slave
Josiah Miars of Portsmouth, Norfolk, Virginia: 12 slaves
Joseph J. Miers of District 21, Macon, Alabama: 6 slaves
Nancy Miers of Northern Division, Carroll, Mississippi: 5 slaves
Samuel Miers of Polk, Texas: 2 slaves
Dennis Mises of El Dorado, Union, Arkansas: 2 slaves
Aaron Miller of Rowan, North Carolina: 9 slaves
Aaron Miller of Copiah, Mississippi: 28 slaves
Abijah Miller of Wilcox, Alabama: 68 slaves
Abram Miller of Winston, Mississippi: 26 slaves
Abram Miller of Preston, Platte, Missouri: 6 slaves
Absalom Miller of Division 1, Wayne, Kentucky: 4 slaves
Benjamin Miller of Dowdells, Harris, Georgia: 11 slaves
Benjamin Miller of Catahoula, Louisiana: 8 slaves
Benjamin F. Miller of Rappahannock, Virginia: 36 slaves
Daniel Miller of Cabarrus, North Carolina: 24 slaves
Daniel Miller of Division 1, Sullivan, Tennessee: 2 slaves
David Miller of Polk, Rutherford, North Carolina: 27 slaves
David Miller of Lexington, Lexington, South Carolina: 17 slaves
David Miller of Division 12, Gordon, Georgia: 6 slaves
David A. Miller of District 1, Ohio, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Elijah Miller of Copiah, Mississippi: 1 slave
Eliphalet Miller of Williamsburg, Williamsburg, South Carolina: 37 slaves
Fanny Miller of District 48, Jefferson, Georgia: 9 slaves
Felix G. Miller of Millersburgh, Rutherford, Tennessee: 10 slaves
Gabriel F. Miller of Mathews, Virginia: 13 slaves
Hiram G. Miller of Knox, Kentucky: 8 slaves
Isaac Miller of District 4, Bedford, Tennessee: 8 slaves
Isaac Miller of Subdivision 7, Claiborne, Tennessee: 13 slaves
Isaac L. Miller of Fosterville, Rutherford, Tennessee: 10 slaves
Isabella Miller of District 1, Fayette, Tennessee: 5 slaves
Isaiah Miller of District 1, Hardin, Kentucky: 9 slaves
Jacob Miller of Subdivision No 2, Washington, Maryland: 10 slaves
Jacob Miller of Baltimore Ward 18, Baltimore, Maryland: 5 slaves
Jacob Miller of Division 59, Meriwether, Georgia: 7 slaves
Jacob Miller of District 9, Giles, Tennessee: 56 slaves
James Miller of Western District, Tensas, Louisiana: 128 slaves
Jeremiah H. Miller of Division 47, Jones, Georgia: 43 slaves
Joel Miller of District 19, Stewart, Georgia: 1 slave
John Miller of District 34, Greene, Missouri:
Jonathan Miller of Davie, North Carolina: 1 slave
Joseph Miller of District 1, Warren, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Joseph Miller of District 2, Bourbon, Kentucky: 8 slaves
Juda Miller of Subdivision 45, Jackson, Georgia: 10 slaves
Levisa Miller of Orangeburg, Orangeburg, South Carolina: 1 slave
Lewis Miller of Madison, Virginia: 11 slaves
Lewis Miller of Bertie, North Carolina: 4 slaves
Levi Miller of Division 3, Washington, Florida: 4 slaves
Mark Miller of Berkshire, Gwinnett, Georgia: 6 slaves
Mary Miller of Fort Smith, Crawford, Arkansas: 4 slaves
Michael Miller of District 57, Roanoke, Virginia: 5 slaves
Michael M. Miller of Eastern Division, Monroe, Mississippi: 6 slaves
Moses Miller of District 35, Madison, Alabama: 7 slaves
Moses W. Miller of Washington, Clay, Missouri: 10 slaves
Nathan Miller of Sulphur Spring, Rutherford, Tennessee: 22 slaves
Nathaniel Miller of Division 3, Washington, Florida: 6 slaves
Paul Miller of Cabarrus, North Carolina: 18 slaves
Rachel Miller of Early, Georgia: 3 slaves
Rader Miller of Northern Division, Marshall, Mississippi: 7 slaves
Reuben Miller of District 38, Mason, Virginia: 4 slaves
Samuel Miller of Spartanburg, South Carolina: 31 slaves
Samuel Miller of Boone, Union, Arkansas: 49 slaves
Sarah Miller of Currituck, North Carolina: 14 slaves
Seth Miller of Catahoula, Louisiana: 7 slaves
Sheffey Miller of Eastern District, Amherst, Virginia: 26 slaves
Simon Miller of District 3, Fayette, Tennessee: 34 slaves
Soloman Miller of San Augustine, San Augustine, Texas: 3 slaves
Solomon Miller of District 28, Jefferson, Virginia: 2 slaves
Solomon Miller of Bertie, North Carolina: 4 slaves
Solomon Miller of Subdivision 90, Warren, Georgia: 10 slaves
Sophia Miller of Rowan, North Carolina: 9 slaves
Stephen Miller of Winston, Mississippi: 35 slaves
Warner J. Miller of Rappahannock, Virginia: 11 slaves
William Miller of District 69, Warren, Virginia: 11 slaves
Zebedee Miller of Northern Division, Marshall, Mississippi: 16 slaves
Sarah Mocabee of Division 2, Bath, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Kisden Mockbee of Montgomery, Tennessee: 5 slaves
Cuthbert Mockebee of District 16, Cass, Missouri: 3 slaves
Thomas Mockyby of Stewart, Tennessee: 24 slaves
August Moher of New Orleans Municipality 1 Ward 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 2 slaves
Emanuel Molina of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 1 slave
Ann W. Mordecai of Raleigh, Wake, North Carolina: 30 slaves
Benjamin Mordecai of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 12 slaves
Harry Mordecai of District 1, Franklin, Kentucky: 5 slaves
Henry Mordecai of Raleigh, Wake, North Carolina: 65 slaves
Jacob Mordecai of Northampton, North Carolina: 38 slaves
Jacob Mordecai of St Mathews, Wake, North Carolina: 65 slaves
J. F. Mordecai of Mobile, Alabama: 2 slaves
Moses C. Mordecai of Columbia, Richland, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Rosina N. Mordecai of Western District, Henrico, Virginia: 7 slaves
S. Mordecai of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 5 slaves
Solomon Mordecai of Mobile, Alabama: 44 slaves
Thomas W. Mordecai of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 2 slaves
W. Mordecai of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 7 slaves
W. C. Mordecai of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 7 slaves
Margaret W. Mose of District 2, Bedford, Tennessee: 3 slaves
Mark E. Mose of Coosa, Coosa, Alabama: 8 slaves
William Mose of Loudon, Virginia: 3 slaves
________ Moses of St Louis Ward 2, St Louis, Missouri: 4 slaves
Aaron F. Moses of Neuse (north side), Wayne, North Carolina: 24 slaves
A. J. Moses of Sumter, Sumter, South Carolina: 33 slaves
C. B. Moses of Western Division, Anderson, South Carolina: 8 slaves
Fenner Moses of Raleigh, Wake, North Carolina: 1 slave
F. J. Moses of Sumter, Sumter, South Carolina: 78 slaves
George C. Moses of Neuse (north side), Wayne, North Carolina: 10 slaves
Henry Moses of Union, North Carolina: 7 slaves
Isaac Moses of Columbus, Muscogee, Georgia: 1 slave
Isaiah Moses of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 4 slaves
James C. Moses of Knoxville, Knox, Tennessee: 3 slaves
James M. Moses of Benton, Tennessee: 1 slave
John F. Moses of Charlotte, Charlotte, Virginia: 6 slaves
John M Moses of Copiah, Mississippi: 3 slaves
Joseph Moses of District 5, Davidson, Tennessee: 3 slaves
L. Moses of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 5 slaves
Levy Moses of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 11 slaves
Levy J Moses of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 5 slaves
Lyon Moses of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 1 slave
M. Moses of W C River, Bibb, Alabama: 7 slaves
Manda Moses of Davis, Franklin, North Carolina: 7 slaves
Mary Moses of Natchitoches, Louisiana: 8 slaves
Nancy Moses of St Peters Parish, Beaufort, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Nancy Moses of Brownsville, Haywood, Tennessee: 10 slaves
Nesby Moses of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Noah Moses of Furrs and Smith, Stanly, North Carolina: 2 slaves
Perry Moses of Sumter, Sumter, South Carolina: 5 slaves
Phillip Moses of District 9, Marshall, Tennessee: 1 slave
R. J. Moses of Columbus, Muscogee, Georgia: 16 slaves
Roger Moses of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 3 slaves
Samuel F. Moses of Charlotte, Charlotte, Virginia: 8 slaves
Simon Moses of Louisville District 2, Jefferson, Kentucky: 1 slave
Sol Moses of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 11 slaves
William Moses of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 2 slaves
William Moses of Louisville District 2, Jefferson, Kentucky:*
William H. Moses of Campbell, Virginia: 1 slave
Alise Myer of Western District, Lafayette, Louisiana: 17 slaves
Frederick Myer of District 2, Marion, Florida: 16 slaves
________ Myers of Lafayette, Jefferson, Louisiana: 5 slaves
Aaron Myers of District 9, Berkeley, Virginia: 6 slaves
Abram Myers of District 2, Bedford, Tennessee: 1 slaves
Absolem Myers of Wadesboro, Anson, North Carolina: 28 slaves
Bernard Myers of District 9, Maury, Tennessee: 7 slaves
Buslind Myers of Rappahannock, Virginia: 9 slaves
C. Myers of Georgetown, Washington, District of Columbia: 2 slaves
Charles Myers of St Helena, Beaufort, South Carolina: 32 slaves
Charles Myers of St Bartholomews Parish, Colleton, South Carolina: 62 slaves
David Myers of District 8, Jackson, Tennessee: 5 slaves
David Myers of Rankin, Mississippi: 2 slaves
David L. Myers of Perry, Mississippi: 27 slaves
Daniel Myres of Amite, Mississippi: 13 slaves
E. J. W. Myers of Orangeburg, South Carolina: 5 slaves
Eleazar Myers of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 5 slaves
Elisha Myers of Lowndes, Lowndes, Alabama: 5 slaves
Elizabeth Myers of Creagerstown, Frederick, Maryland: 5 slaves
Emmely Myers of District 3, Orleans, Louisiana: 2 slaves
George J. Myers of Marion, South Carolina: 54 slaves
Gresham Myers of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 1 slave
G. W. Myers of Richland, Holmes, Mississippi: 25 slaves
Hannah Myers of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 15 slaves
H. L. Myers of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 14 slaves
H. N. Myers of Nashville, Davidson, Tennessee: 6 slaves
Henry Myers of Richland, South Carolina: 11 slaves
Henry Myers of District 2, Lincoln, Kentucky: 12 slaves
Henry M. Myers of District 23, Cooper, Missouri: 6 slaves
Isaac Myers of Lawrence, Mississippi: 53 slaves
Isaias Myers of West Feliciana, Louisiana: 4 slaves
J. Myers of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama: 4 slaves
James Myres of East Feliciana, Louisiana: 16 slaves
John Myers of District 24, Hampshire, Virginia: 23 slaves
John Myers of District 8, Boone, Missouri: 13 slaves
L. D. Myers of District 9, Maury, Tennessee: 9 slaves
Margaret Myers of Orangeburg, South Carolina: 11 slaves
Mary Myers of Orangeburg, South Carolina: 5 slaves
Mary M. Myers of Subdivision 2, Muhlenberg, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Matilda Myers of Division 2, Bath, Kentucky: 8 slaves
Moses Myers of Eastern Division, Chickasaw, Mississippi: 7 slaves
Myer Myers of Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia: 6 slaves
Phaloy Myers of Richland, South Carolina: 35 slaves
Philip Myers of Hinds, Mississippi: 23 slaves
Robert C. Myers of District 1, Montgomery, Alabama: 48 slaves
Ruthy Myers of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 20 slaves
Samuel S. Myers of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 12 slaves
Sarah Myers of Fairfield, South Carolina: 78 slaves
Sarah Myers of Perry, Mississippi: 14 slaves
Sarah K. Myers of Anderson, Kentucky: 4 slaves
Stephen C Myers of Northern Division, Marshall, Mississippi: 13 slaves
S. W. Myers of Division 8, Leon, Florida: 4 slaves
Thomas W. Myers of Richland, Holmes, Mississippi: slaves
Tudak Myers of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 1 slave
William Myers of Rankin, Mississippi: 11 slaves
William B. Myers of Division 1, Jessamine, Kentucky: 1 slave
William H. Myers of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 100 slaves
William M. Myers of Richland, South Carolina: 140 slaves
W. R. Myers of Charlotte, Mecklenburg, North Carolina: 4 slaves


N:

Arthur Neuman of District 69, Pulaski, Georgia: 11 slaves
John Neuman of District 69, Pulaski, Georgia: 4 slaves
A. Newman of Jefferson, Mississippi: 39 slaves
Benjamin Newman of Fairfax, Virginia: 1 slave
Benjamin Newman of Laurens, South Carolina: 53 slaves
Benjamin Newman of Brush Creek, Perry, Alabama: 2 slaves
Caleb R. Newman of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 5 slaves
David Newman of Spartanburg, South Carolina: 4 slaves
George Newman of Orange, Virginia: 3 slaves
H. I. Newman of Division 19, Coweta, Georgia: 2 slaves
Henry Newman of Stratton Major Parish, King and Queen, Virginia: 1 slave
Henry Newman of Washington Ward 1, Washington, District of Columbia: 5 slaves
Henry Newman of District 2, Logan, Kentucky: 1 slave
Henry Newman of Washington, Alabama: 10 slaves
Horace N. Newman of Prince William, Virginia: 4 slaves
J. Newman of Cumberland, Cumberland, Kentucky: 1 slave
Jacob Newman of Northern Division, Sampson, North Carolina: 8 slaves
Jacob Newman of District 8, Franklin, Tennessee: 5 slaves
Jacob Newman of Knoxville, Knox, Tennessee: 5 slaves
James C. Newman of Warren, Mississippi: 7 slaves
James W. Newman of District 1, Montgomery, Alabama
John M. Newman of Franklin, Mississippi: 39 slaves
Johnathon P. Newman of Franklin, Mississippi: 21 slaves
Joseph Newman of Farnham Parish, Richmond, Virginia: 1 slave
Joseph Newman of Livingston County, Livingston, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Josiah Newman of Warren, Mississippi: 130 slaves
N. Newman of Subdivision 94, Wilkes, Georgia: 5 slaves
Obediah Newman of District 1, Breckinridge, Kentucky: 16 slaves
W. L. Newman of Wharton, Wharton, Texas: 6 slaves
Sol Nodlinger of Clarke, Alabama: 7 slaves
Augustin Nunez of St Bernard, Louisiana: 4 slaves
Celestin Nunez of Western District Ward 6, Vermillion, Louisiana: 3 slaves
Charles Nunez of District 66, Burke, Georgia: 2 slaves
Joseph Nunez of Western District Ward 6, Vermillion, Louisiana: 17 slaves
Vincent Nunez of St Bernard, Louisiana: 12 slaves
Ann Nunis of Pensacola, Escambia, Florida: 12 slaves


P:

Dyer Pearl of Nashville, Davidson, Tennessee: 6 slaves
George Pearl of Grayson, Kentucky: 1 slave
Hezekiah Pearl of Morgan, Missouri: 7 slaves
James T. Pearl of Prairie, Franklin, Arkansas: 2 slaves
Mary Pearl of West Feliciana, Louisiana: 1 slave
Samuel Pearl of District 99, Warren, Missouri: 2 slaves
Sarah C. Pearl of Laurel, Kentucky: 6 slaves
William S. Pearl of Division 1, Garrard, Kentucky: 14 slaves
Francis Polace of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Ephriam Pollock of District 44, Ohio, Virginia: 2 slaves
Isaac Pollock of Bracken, Kentucky: 6 slaves
Ira L Polack of District 2, Nelson, Kentucky: 11 slaves
Josiah Pollock of Florence, Lauderdale, Alabama: 1 slave
Lewis Pollock of District 11, Houston, Georgia: 15 slaves
Morris Pollock of District 11, Houston, Georgia: 7 slaves


R:

Sol Rhodes of District 9, Tipton, Tennessee: 6 slaves
Benjamin Rosaman of Township 13 Range 7, Attala, Mississippi: 9 slaves
Adam Roseman of Rowan, North Carolina: 2 slaves
Andrew Roseman of Lincoln, North Carolina: 3 slaves
Daniel Roseman of Catawba, North Carolina: 16 slaves
David Roseman of Rowan, North Carolina: 2 slaves
Edward M. Roseman of Rowan, North Carolina: 2 s;aves
James Roseman of Greenville, South Carolina: 5 slaves
James C. Roseman of Rowan, North Carolina: 12 slaves
John Roseman of Eastern Division, Anderson, South Carolina: 26 slaves
John H. Roseman of Talladega, Talladega, Alabama: 25 slaves
Mary T. Roseman of Rowan, North Carolina: 3 slaves
Samuel Roseman of Township 13 Range 7, Attala, Mississippi: 14 slaves
Thomas Roseman of Abbeville, South Carolina: 4 slaves
J. Rosenbane of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 1 slave
Charles Rosenberg of Fayette, Texas: 1 slave
Anthony Rosenberger of District 9, Berkeley, Virginia: 2 slaves
George Rosenberger of District 56, Rockingham, Virginia: 2 slaves
Francis Rosenberry of Western Division, Choctaw, Mississipp: 3 slaves
Alexander Rozenbrom of District 68, Wythe, Virginia: 3 slaves
Jacob Rozenbrom of District 68, Wythe, Virginia: 4 slaves
Stephen Rozenbund of District 68, Wythe, Virginia: 1 slave
_______ Ross of Iberville, Louisiana: 11 slaves
Abraham Ross of Henry, Virginia: 5 slaves
Absalom Ross of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 6 slaves
Adam Ross of District 2, Baltimore, Maryland: 19 slaves
Anne Ross of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 5 slaves
Azariah Ross of District 29, Fayette, Georgia: 13 slaves
Benjamin Ross of District 23, Talbot, Georgia: 6 slaves
Benjamin A. Ross of Edgefield, South Carolina: 6 slaves
Benjamin C. Ross of Baltimore Ward 9, Baltimore, Maryland: 7 slaves
Daniel Ross of North District, Patrick, Virginia: 5 slaves
David Ross of District 3, Madison, Kentucky: 9 slaves
David T. Ross of Iberville, Louisiana: 11 slaves
Eli A. Ross of York, York, South Carolina: 13 slaves
Elijah Ross of North Creek, Beaufort, North Carolina: 7 slaves
Ely K. W. Ross of Ward 1, Morehouse, Louisiana: 28 slaves
Enoch P. Ross of Livingston County, Livingston, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Frederick A. Ross of District 6, Hawkins, Tennessee: 12 slaves
Gabriel Ross of District 2, Madison, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Gabriel Ross of District 1, Logan, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Hannah Ross of Morgan, Missouri: 1 slave
Hiram Ross of District 21, Jackson, Alabama: 10 slaves
Inat Ross of Division 20, Crawford, Georgia: 26 slaves
Isaac Ross of District 1, Montgomery, Alabama: 31 slaves
Isaac Ross of Eastern Division, Chickasaw, Mississippi: 6 slaves
Israel Ross of Lafayette, Ouachita, Arkansas: 1 slave
John Ross of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Joseph Ross of District 1, Fleming, Kentucky: 1 slave
Joseph B. Ross of District 21, Macon, Alabama: 11 slaves
Joshua Ross of Bull Head, Greene, North Carolina: 1 slave*
Kiseman M. Ross of District 19, Chambers, Alabama: 37 slaves
Levi Ross of Northern Division, Guilford, North Carolina: 12 slaves
Levin Ross of Caddo, Clark, Arkansas: 7 slaves
Louis Ross of District 1, Dorchester, Maryland: 6 slaves
Lucretia Ross of Natchez, Adams, Mississippi: 2 slaves
Marcus L. Ross of Cleveland, North Carolina: 3 slaves
Martin Ross of North Creek, Beaufort, North Carolina: 2 slaves
Meshack Ross of Western District, Carroll, Louisiana: 27 slaves
Michael Ross of Kemper, Mississippi: 19 slaves
Nathan Ross of Louisiana, Chicot, Arkansas: 65 slaves
Rachel Ross of Richland, Crawford, Arkansas: 7 slaves
Reuben Ross of Districts 1-4, Montgomery, Tennessee: 2 slaves
Shopley P. Ross of Milam and Williamson, Milam, Texas: 2 slaves
Samuel Ross of District 2, Wilson, Tennessee: 4 slaves
Samul Ross of Subdivision 2, Muhlenberg, Kentucky: 1 slave
Seth Ross of Tallahatchie, Mississippi: 9 slaves
Simeon Ross of Lawrence, Mississippi: 10 slaves
Stephen Ross of District 62, New Madrid, Missouri: 7 slaves
Tempy Ross of North District, Alamance, North Carolina: 3 slaves
Thomas Ross of Shell Point, Wakulla, Florida: 20 slaves
Alex Roth of Iberville, Louisiana: 20 slaves
J. B. Roth of Iberville, Louisiana: 6 slaves
Maria G. Roth of District 47, Lawrence, Missouri: 5 slaves
M. I. A. Roth of Iberville, Louisiana: 9 slaves
N. Roth of Iberville, Louisiana: 19 slaves
Selestine Roth of Iberville, Louisiana: 20 slaves
S. Roth of Iberville, Louisiana: 19 slaves
Alexander Rozeman of Iredell, North Carolina: 9 slaves
George Rozeman of Iredell, North Carolina: 3 slaves
Henry Ruben of Carondelet, St Louis, Missouri: 1 slave
Madame Rubin of Harrison, Mississippi: 2 slaves
Matthew S. Rubey of District 2, Ohio, Kentucky: 1 slave
Benjamin Ruby of Pensacola, Escambia, Florida: 3 slaves
Fertina Ruby of District 2, Hopkins, Kentucky: 6 slaves
Henry Ruby of Blue, Jackson, Missouri: 4 slaves
Henry M. Ruby of District 68, Pettis, Missouri: 4 slaves
Jno. Ruby of Baltimore Ward 19, Baltimore, Maryland: 3 slaves
John Ruby of District 1, Queen Anne's, Maryland: 1 slave
John B. Ruby of District 20, Bedford, Tennessee: 1 slave
Joseph Ruby of Pensacola, Escambia, Florida: 1 slave
Mary A. Ruby of St Tammany, Louisiana: 7 slaves
Samuel C. Ruby of District 19, Clark, Missouri: 2 slaves
Thomas Ruby of Allegany, Maryland: 4 slaves


S:

Benjamin F. Salman of Division 88, Walton, Georgia: 8 slaves
John Salman of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 1 slave
David Salmon of Knoxville, Knox, Tennessee: 1 slave*
Elizabeth Salmon of Albemarle, Virginia: 26 slaves
Evaline Salmon of District 2, Todd, Kentucky: 17 slaves
Ezekiel J. Salmon of Morgan, Missouri: 8 slaves
Gainor Salmon of Southern Division, Robeson, North Carolina: 5 slaves
George Salmon of Fredericktown, Frederick, Maryland: 1 slave
John Salmon of Ballard, Kentucky: 1 slave
John Salmon of Warren, Mississippi: 11 slaves
Jordan Salmon of Goochland, Virginia: 6 slaves
Kilba Salmon of South Division, Duplin, North Carolina: 1 slave*
L. S. Salmon of District 68, Pike, Georgia: 6 slaves
N. B. Salmon of District 4, Audrain, Missouri: 3 slaves
P. H. Salmon of District 1, Todd, Kentucky: 7 slaves
William Salmon of Goochland, Virginia: 35 slaves
R. D. Salmond of Simpson, Kentucky: 11 slaves
Thomas Salmond of Kershaw, South Carolina: 17 slaves
Aquilla Salmons of District 1, Clark, Kentucky: 1 slave
Delaware Salmons of Princess Anne, Virginia: 5 slaves
Jesse J. Salmons of Eastern District, Amherst, Virginia: 11 slaves
John Salmons of Henry, Virginia: 6 slaves
Mary Salmons of Henry, Virginia: 3 slaves
Nathan Salmons of District 2, Shelby, Kentucky: 5 slaves
E. D. Saloman of Simpson, Kentucky: 11 slaves
Joseph Saloman of New Orleans Municipality 3 Ward 1, Orleans, Louisiana: 3 slaves
P. Salomon of New Orleans Municipality 1 Ward 1, Orleans, Louisiana: 1 slave
Ann Samuel of Nor Stated, Caroline, Virginia: 3 slaves
Benjamin Samuel of Scott, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Joseph Samuel of District 3, Robertson, Tennessee: 1 slave
Julia Samuel of District 1, Franklin, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Leonard Samuel of St Stephens Parish, King and Queen, Virginia: 4 slaves
Musco Samuel of Edgefield, South Carolina: 17 slaves
Reuben Samuel of Division 2, Garrard, Kentucky: 5 slaves
Shadrick Samuel of District 2, Augusta, Virginia: 2 slaves
Benjamin Samuels of District 52, Lincoln, Georgia: 8 slaves
Joseph H. Samuels of District 58, Shenandoah, Virginia: 5 slaves
Josiah Samuels of District 52, Lincoln, Georgia: 3 slaves
Mary Samuels of Auraria, Lumpkin, Georgia: 11 slaves
Sol Samuels of Memphis Ward 5, Shelby, Tennessee: 6 slaves
Wolfe Samuels of Louisville District 3, Jefferson, Kentucky: 6 slaves
Adam Schaeffer of Buckeystown, Frederick, Maryland: 5 slaves
Jacob Schaeffer of District 1, Henderson, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Thomas Schaeffer of District 1, Henderson, Kentucky: 1 slave
William Scheaffer of District 28, Jefferson, Virginia: 6 slaves
Louis Schafer of Louisville District 3, Jefferson, Kentucky: 3 slaves
William Schafer of District 23, Cooper, Missouri: 2 slaves
C. Schaffer of Alexandria, Alexandria, Virginia: 2 slaves
David Schaffer of Fredericktown, Frederick, Maryland: 1 slave
F. Schaffer of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 13 slaves
J. Schaffer of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 4 slaves
John D. Schaffer of District 1, Kent, Maryland: 2 slaves
M. C. Schaffer of Ascension, Louisiana: 2 slaves
William Schaffer of District 2, Henderson, Kentucky: 1 slave
Frederick Scheffer of District 58, Shenandoah, Virginia: 3 slaves
Jacob Shutz of Shepherdstown, Jefferson, Virginia: 1 slave
Jonas Seager of Kenton, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Samuel Seager of District 71, Burke, Georgia: 15 slaves
Benjamin Seegar of District 1, Queen Anne's, Maryland: 4 slaves
James Seegar of District 6, Queen Anne's, Maryland: 7 slaves
John Seegar of District 1, Queen Anne's, Maryland: 7 slaves
Thomas Seegar of District 6, Queen Anne's, Maryland: 7 slaves
A. B. Segar of Right Bank, Orleans, Louisiana: 3 slaves
Charlotte Segar of Hampton, Elizabeth City, Virginia: 10 slaves
David Segar of District 2, Lewis, Kentucky: 4 slaves
Henry J. Segar of Russell, Alabama: 2 slaves
Jacob Segar of District 2, Lewis, Kentucky: 1 slave
Joseph Segar of Hampton, Elizabeth City, Virginia: 4 slaves
Precilla Segar of Drysdale Parish, King and Queen, Virginia: 11 slaves
William Segar of Township 15 Range 6, Attala, Mississippi: 11 slaves
Edney Segars of Division 1, Darlington, South Carolina: 10 slaves
John Segars of Union, North Carolina: 7 slaves
John Segars of Chesterfield, Chesterfield, South Carolina: 26 slaves
Mary Segars of Division 2, Darlington, South Carolina: 1 slave
H. B. Segers of Pike, Alabama: 2 slaves
Henry Shafer of Petersville, Frederick, Maryland: 8 slaves
Samuel Shafer of Subdivision No 2, Washington, Maryland: 3 slaves
Adam Shaffer of Oktibbeha, Mississippi: 8 slaves
F. Shaffer of Prince George Winyaw, Georgetown, South Carolina: 66 slaves
Henrietta M. Shaffer of District 106, Hancock, Georgia: 6 slaves
Jacob Shaffer of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 18 slaves
John Shaffer of Allegany, Maryland: 3 slaves
John Shaffer of Fannin, Texas: 4 slves
John F. Shaffer of Brush Creek, Perry, Alabama: 12 slaves
Margaret Shaffer of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 1 slave
Simon P. Shaffer of Hatchet Creek, Coosa, Alabama: 2 slaves
Susan Shaffer of Division 8, Leon, Florida: 2 slaves
William Shaffer of Talladega, Talladega, Alabama: 4 slaves
William A. Shaffer of Terrebonne, Louisiana: 46 slaves
Emanuel Sheftall of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 6 slaves
Mordecai Sheftall Sr. of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 7 slaves
Mordecai Sheftall Jr, of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 2 slaves
Austin Sheftell of Subdivision 22, Meigs, Tennessee: 1 slave
Abram Shull of District 58, Moniteau, Missouri: 3 slaves
A. Sigur of Iberville, Louisiana: 56 slaves
Alexander Sigur of District 2, Assumption, Louisiana: 14 slaves
Hannah Sidon of District 18, Wilson, Tennessee: 3 slaves*
George Silmon of Beat 4, Butler, Alabama: 10 slaves
D. Sliver of Allens Fresh, Charles, Maryland: 8 slaves
Francis Silver of District 16, Frederick, Virginia: 24 slaves
Gershom Silver of District 73, Ralls, Missouri: 4 slaves
Green B. Silver of Yancey, North Carolina: 5 slaves
James Silver of District 1, Harford, Maryland: 4 slaves
James Y. Silvers of Division 3, Tippah, Mississippi: 2 slaves
Joseph Silver of Division 1, Baldwin, Alabama: 40 slaves
Silas Silver of District 46, Lafayette, Missouri: 3 slaves
S. B. Silver of District 2, Harford, Maryland: 2 slaves
William Silver of District 73, Ralls, Missouri: 2 slaves
Andrew Silvers of District 2, Mercer, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Charity Silvers of The 3d Election & 2nd Centers District, Harford, Maryland: 4 slaves
David Silvers of District 3, Harford, Maryland: 1 slave
Harvey L. Silvers of District 59, Monroe, Missouri: 1 slave
L. H. & W. Silvers of Liberty, Washington, Missouri: 13 slaves
Zeffemiah Silvers of District 9, Berkeley, Virginia: 8 slaves
Joseph Silvier of Princess Anne, Virginia: 3 slaves
James Sollomon of Second Regiment 33, Madison, Alabama: 8 slaves
H. Soloman of Division 4, Twiggs, Georgia: 10 slaves
Hardy Soloman of Division 84, Twiggs, Georgia: 20 slaves
Isaac Solomon of Baltimore Ward 6, Baltimore, Maryland: 1 slave
Owen Soloman of District 27, Hamilton, Tennessee: 3 slaves
S. L. Soloman of Southern District, Henry, Alabama: 9 slaves
_________ Solomon of Wilcox, Alabama: 82 slaves
Benjamin F. Solomon of Subdivision 2, Lincoln, Tennessee 2 slaves
D. Solomon of Division 91, Washington, Georgia: 2 slaves
Hart Solomon of Subdivision 2, Lincoln, Tennessee: 9 slaves
Henry Solomon of Beat 4, Butler, Alabama:
Ira Solomon of District 5, Warren, Tennessee: 5 slaves
James Soloman of Nash, North Carolina: 1 slave
Jerry Solomon of Powells, Franklin, North Carolina: 21 slaves
Jno. H. Solomon of Lynchburg, Campbell, Virginia: 3 slaves
John Solomon of District 11, Cocke, Tennessee: 4 slaves
Lewis Solomon of Division 84, Twiggs, Georgia: 4 slaves
Peter Solomon of Georgia Militia District 483, Bibb, Georgia: 7 slaves
Robert Solomon of Wilcox, Alabama: 4 slaves
Samuel Solomon of Alexandria, Alexandria, Virginia: 1 slave
William C. Solomon of Subdivision 2, Lincoln, Tennessee: 4 slaves
William N. Solomon of Township 22 Ward 7, Claiborne, Louisiana: 1 slave
A. A. Solomons of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 7 slaves
D. Solomons of Subdivision 93, Wilkinson, Georgia: 24 slaves
Edward Solomons of Sumter, Sumter, South Carolina: 4 slaves*
Eliott Solomons of St Peters Parish, Beaufort, South Carolina: 11 slaves
Ellen Solomons of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 4 slaves
E.W. Solomons of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 3 slaves
Henry Solomons of St Peters Parish, Beaufort, South Carolina: 83 slaves
John G. Solomons of St Peters Parish, Beaufort, South Carolina: 30 slaves
Leonard Solomons of Black Hall, DeKalb, Georgia: 12 slaves
Lizar Solomons of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 1 slave
Rachel Solomons of Sumter, Sumter, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Samuel Solomons of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 7 slaves
William Solomons of Division 12, Cass, Georgia: 29 slaves
William P. Solomons of St Peters Parish, Beaufort, South Carolina: 45 slaves
Sol Spainhour of Germanton, Stokes, North Carolina: 5 slaves
J. W. Stanmire of District 13, Panola, Mississippi: 3 slaves
James T. Stein of Baltimore Ward 5, Baltimore, Maryland: 7 slaves
William D. Stein of Lawrence, Mississippi: 8 slaves
John H. Steinmeyer of St Andrews, Charleston, South Carolina: 5 slaves
Stephen Steinway of Howard, Missouri: 4 slaves
________ Stene of Iberville, Louisiana: 17 slaves
Aaron Sterling of Brinkleys, Somerset, Maryland: 3 slaves
Clemment Sterling of Brinkleys, Somerset, Maryland: 5 slaves
E. Sterling of St Mary, Louisiana: 15 slaves
Elijah Sterling of Brinkleys, Somerset, Maryland: 6 slaves
Ephriam Sterling of Brinkleys, Somerset, Maryland: 1 slave
Handy Sterling of Brinkleys, Somerset, Maryland: 1 slave
Henney Sterling of Brinkleys, Somerset, Maryland: 1 slave
Henry Sterling of Brinkleys, Somerset, Maryland: 11 slaves
Herbert Sterling of Kemper, Mississippi:3 slaves
Isaac Sterling of Division 66, Oglethorpe, Georgia: 1 slave
Isaac Sterling of Brinkleys, Somerset, Maryland: 2 slaves
James L. Stirling of West Feliciana, Louisiana: 15 slaves
Jesse Sterling of Brinkleys, Somerset, Maryland: 1 slave
John Sterling of Brinkleys, Somerset, Maryland: 2 slaves
Josiah Sterling of Brinkleys, Somerset, Maryland: 2 slaves
Lewis Stirling of West Feliciana, Louisiana: 127 slaves
Mary Sterling of West Feliciana, Louisiana: 126 slaves
Nathan Sterling of Northern Division, Sampson, North Carolina: 1 slave
Nathaniel Sterling of Brinkleys, Somerset, Maryland: 1 slave
Noah Sterling of Brinkleys, Somerset, Maryland: 2 slaves
R. G. Stirling of West Feliciana, Louisiana: 106 slaves
Rachel Sterling of Ward 11, Ouachita, Louisiana: 4 slaves
Sam Sterling of Chester, South Carolina: 1 slave
Samuel Sterling of Brinkleys, Somerset, Maryland: 6 slaves
Samuel Sterling of Fairfield, South Carolina: 15 slaves
John Stine of District 39, Monroe, Virginia: 6 slaves
Ellen Stienmeyer of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 3 slaves
J. H. Stienmeyer of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 3 slaves
Mary Stinemetz of Chesterfield, Chesterfield, South Carolina: 11 slaves
Benjamin F. Stinn of Tranters Creek, Beaufort, North Carolina: 13 slaves
Abraham Stone of York, York, South Carolina: 6 slaves
Ambrose Stone of District 14, Marion, Alabama: 1 slave
Asa L. Stone of District 1, Nicholas, Kentucky: 9 slaves
Asher Stone of District 1, Henderson, Kentucky: 13 slaves
Barsheba Stone of Henry, Virginia: 4 slaves
Bashaby Stone of Catahoula, Louisiana: 6 slaves
Benjamin Stone of District 68, Pettis, Missouri: 3 slaves
Benjamin R. Stone of St Peters Parish, Beaufort, South Carolina: 4 slaves
Bernard Stone of District 1, Nelson, Kentucky: 10 slaves
Caleb Stone of District 2, Madison, Kentucky: 14 slaves
Caleb Stone of Fairfax, Virginia: 4 slaves
Cusibias Stone of District 4, Overton, Tennessee: 6 slaves
Daniel Stone of Fluvanna, Virginia: 27 slaves
Daniel Stone of Kaw, Jackson, Missouri: 25 slaves
David Stone of Hayesville, Franklin, North Carolina: 20 slaves
Deint C. Stone of Louisburg, Franklin, North Carolina: 6 slaves
Eli Stone of Northern Division, Marshall, Mississippi: 3 slaves
Enoch Stone of District 1, Daviess, Kentucky: 11 slaves
Eusebius Stone of Jackson, Sevier, Arkansas: 5 slaves
Felix B. Stone of District 1, Spencer, Kentucky: 7 slaves
Gabriel B. Stone of Northern Division, Marshall, Mississippi: 10 slaves
Hannah W Stone of Eastern District, Stafford, Virginia: 11 slaves
Hiram Stone of District 2, Bourbon, Kentucky: 4 slaves
Isaac Stone of Township 23, Tallapoosa, Alabama: 7 slaves
Isaac Stone of Talladega, Talladega, Alabama: 48 slaves
Isaac B. Stone of Lowndes, Lowndes, Alabama: 9 slaves
Isaac K. Stone of District 1, Caldwell, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Isaac S. Stone of Ashbys, Fauquier, Virginia: 18 slaves
Jacob Stone of District 1, Fayette, Kentucky: 1 slave
Jacob Stone of District 1, Woodford, Kentucky: 12 slaves
Jason Stone of Northern Division, Brunswick, Virginia: 13 slaves
Jemimah Stone of Camden, Ouachita, Arkansas: 9 slaves
Jesse Stone of District 34, Madison, Alabama: 26 slaves
Joel Stone of Talladega, Talladega, Alabama: 4 slaves
Joel Stone of Northern Division, DeSoto, Mississippi: 1 slave
John Abram Stone of Beaver Dam, Granville, North Carolina: 12 slaves
Joseph Stone of Allens Fresh, Charles, Maryland: 9 slaves
Joseph Stone of Lower Regiment, Chatham, North Carolina: 15 slaves
Joseph H. Stone of Campbell, Virginia: 9 slaves
Joshua Stone of District 3, St Mary's, Maryland: 5 slaves
Judith Stone of District 4, Henderson, Tennessee: 4 slaves
Lemuel Stone of District 2, Spencer, Kentucky: 17 slaves
Leonard Stone of Williamsburg, Williamsburg, South Carolina: 20 slaves
Levi Stone of District 2, Lincoln, Kentucky: 4 slaves
Manoah Stone of District 1, Adair, Kentucky: 12 slaves
Mathew A. Stone of District 3, St Mary's, Maryland: 5 slaves
Meajah Stone of Brownings, Decatur, Georgia: 6 slaves
Micajah Stone of Madison, Missouri: 5 slaves
Michager Stone of District 1, Woodford, Kentucky: 8 slaves
Michael Stone of Charlottesville, Albemarle, Virginia: 2 slaves
Michael J. Stone of Aquasco, Prince George's, Maryland: 8 slaves
Moses Stone of District 1, Caldwell, Kentucky: 3 slaves
Nathaniel Stone of District 1, Woodford, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Rheuben Stone of Subdivision 2, Lincoln, Tennessee: 8 slaves
Riseah Stone of Newberry, South Carolina: 14 slaves
Sampson Stone of District 1, Daviess, Kentucky: 1 slave
Samuel Stone of District 1, Baltimore, Maryland: 26 slaves
Samuel Stone of Fairfax, Virginia: 8 slaves
Samuel Stone of District 1, Madison, Kentucky: 52 slaves
Samuel Stone of District 1, Bath, Kentucky: 7 slaves
Samuel N. Stone of Gaston, North Carolina: 8 slaves
Sefferciss Stone of Henry, Virginia: 6 slaves
Seymour Stone of District 2, Nelson, Kentucky: 10 slaves
Silepen Stone of District 4, Sumner, Tennessee: 5 slaves
Simon Stone of Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia: 2 slaves
Simon Stone of Pontotoc, Mississipp: 5 slaves
Theophilu Stone of Hannibal, Marion, Missouri: 1 slave
Uriah Stone of District 1, Fayette, Kentucky: 2 slaves
Z. Stone of District 6, Gibson, Tennessee: 4 slaves


W:

_______ Weinberg of St John the Baptist, Louisiana: 7 slaves
John A. Weinman of Louisville District 1, Jefferson, Kentucky: 2 slaves
B. Wienberg of St Michael and St Phillip, Charleston, South Carolina: 1 slave
Z. Wenberg of New Orleans Municipality 2 Ward 2, Orleans, Louisiana: 4 slaves


Z:

G. A. Zeagler of Orangeburg, Orangeburg, South Carolina: 12 slaves
M. Zeagler of Orangeburg, Orangeburg, South Carolina: 10 slaves
Ann Zeigler of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 13 slaves
Cathrine Zeigler of Orangeburg, South Carolina: 12 slaves
D. A. Zeigler of Orangeburg, South Carolina: 13 slaves
Daniel Zeigler of Orangeburg, South Carolina: 23 slaves
David Zeigler of Orangeburg, South Carolina: 19 slaves
David A. Zeigler of Rockville, Montgomery, Maryland: 3 slaves
E. J. Zeigler of Independence, Autauga, Alabama: 42 slaves
George Zeigler of Wetumpka, Autauga, Alabama: 4 slaves
H. M. Zeigler of Orangeburg, South Carolina: 16 slaves
Henry Zeigler of Wetumpka, Autauga, Alabama: 35
Jacob Zeigler of Orangeburg, South Carolina: 3 slaves
Jacob J. Zeigler of Lowndes, Georgia: 18 slaves
James C. Zeigler of Wetumpka, Autauga, Alabama: 1 slave
J. C. H. Zeigler of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 9 slaves
J. D. O. Zeigler of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 11 slaves
Joel Zeigler of Coosada, Autauga, Alabama: 41 slaves
John M. Zeigler of Orangeburg, South Carolina: 9 slaves
John W. Zeigler of Orangeburg, South Carolina: 17 slaves
Josiah Zeigler of Orangeburg, South Carolina: 7 slaves
Lewis Zeigler of Orangeburg, South Carolina: 39 slaves
Lewis Zeigler of Wetumpka, Autauga, Alabama: 36 slaves
Michael Zeigler of Franklin, Virginia: 4 slaves
Nathaniel Zeigler of District 7, Gadsden, Florida: 67 slaves
Nicholas Zeigler of Coosa, Coosa, Alabama: 10 slaves
Sarah Zeigler of America, Barnwell, South Carolina: 6 slaves
Solomon Zeigler of District 13, Chatham, Georgia: 8 slaves
William Zeigler of Division 20, Crawford, Georgia: 90 slaves
William Zeigler of Lowndes, Georgia: 22 slaves
Catharine Zimerman of Abbeville, South Carolina: 10 slaves
Frances E. Zimerman of Abbeville, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Irving Zimerman of Wilcox, Alabama: 54 slaves
John Zimerman of Abbeville, South Carolina: 12 slaves
Abram Zimmerman of District 67, Washington, Virginia: 14 slaves
Benjamin Zimmerman of District 67, Washington, Virginia: 1 slave
Charles C. A. Zimmerman of Columbia, Richland, South Carolina: 2 slaves
Charles P. Zimmerman of District 1, Montgomery, Alabama: 30 slaves
D. Zimmerman of Spartanburg, South Carolina: 3 slaves
E. D. Zimmerman of Buckeystown, Frederick, Maryland: 2 slaves
George Zimmerman of Frederick, Frederick, Maryland: 4 slaves
George Zimmerman of Western District, Botetourt, Virginia: 1 slave
George T. Zimmerman of Creagerstown, Frederick, Maryland: 1 slave
George W. Zimmerman of District 49, Lincoln, Missouri: 9 slaves
J. Zimmerman of Spartanburg, Spartanburg, South Carolina: 5 slaves
J. C. Zimmerman of Spartanburg, South Carolina: 97 slaves
J. H. Zimmerman of Newberry, Newberry, South Carolina: 4 slaves
J. H. Zimmerman of Alexandria, Alexandria, Virginia: 3 slaves
Jno. P. Zimmerman of Division 3, Darlington, South Carolina: 88 slaves
John F. Zimmerman of District 143, Greene, Georgia: 10 slaves
Joshua Zimmerman of District 2, Boone, Kentucky: 12 slaves
M. Zimmerman of Petersburg, Petersburg, Virginia: 6 slaves
Michael Zimmerman of Creagerstown, Frederick, Maryland: 8 slaves
R. Zimmerman of Orangeburg, Orangeburg, South Carolina: 61 slaves
Robert M. Zimmerman of Richmond, Henrico, Virginia: 1 slave
S. Zimmerman of Vicksburg, Warren, Mississippi: 23 slaves
Samuel Zimmerman of Edgefield, South Carolina: 23 slaves
T. H. Zimmerman of Orangeburg, Orangeburg, South Carolina: 72 slaves
Thomas J. Zimmerman of District 1, Montgomery, Alabama: 35 slaves
Wm Zimmerman of Orangeburg, South Carolina: 9 slaves
Sol Zant of Division 12, Cass, Georgia: 15 slaves

All the individuals in the above list appear in the 1850 U.S. Federal Census Slave Schedules.

There is a searchable database of the 1850 U.S. Federal Census Slave Schedules here: https://www.ancestry.com/search/coll...laveschedules/

If you want to verify anyone on the list, just enter his name in the search feature and it will pull him up. You can then see a photo of the original document listing the slaves he owned.

*

Source: https://f196bbs.com/fluxbb/viewtopic.php?id=13010
__________________
No jews, just right

Less talk, more action

Last edited by Sean Gruber; July 16th, 2019 at 04:41 PM. Reason: added URL
 
Reply

Share


Thread
Display Modes


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:13 PM.
Page generated in 0.25160 seconds.