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Old August 10th, 2013 #41
Alex Linder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M.N. Dalvez View Post
Who the fuck thinks spiders are bad or 'worse'?

Squeamish women and ignorant bastards - that's who.

(How does an ignorant, glib jew bastard get a job as a nature writer? Whoops, I just answered my own question - he's a jew. Tribal nepotism, that's how.)

Spiders are fantastic creatures.

Yeah, sometimes people get bitten by them. Sometimes people even die from spider bite.

But you don't hear everyone complaining so much about mosquitoes, say, who have killed orders-of-magnitude more people than spiders could ever even aspire to.

The greatest thing about spiders is, they don't compete against us. Or prey on us. In fact, they are creatures which complement humans - despite the occasional spider-bite, which can be put down to miscommunication and accident much, much more than malice and predation.
The worst thing about spiders is they leave webs everywhere. If you clean one up, they just make a new one overnight.
 
Old August 10th, 2013 #42
Alex Linder
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New Popeye fly species discovered in Tahiti
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Six new fly species, called Popeye flies for their enlarged middle legs, were discovered recently in the islands of Tahiti. (Neal Evenhuis)

By Brad Balukjian

August 9, 2013, 5:24 p.m.

Popeye the Sailor Man wouldn’t hurt a fly — at least, not this one.

Scientists reported earlier this week in the journal Zootaxa that they had discovered six new species of “Popeye flies” on the islands of Tahiti. The insects are distinguished by their bulging middle legs, which resemble Popeye’s buff forearms (no tattoos are visible on the bugs, however).

They’re also one of the most diverse groups of insects in Tahiti. The yellowish flies, in the genus Campsicnemus (Latin for “bent legs”), are about the length of a pencil eraser and have bulging red eyes. Perched on six spindly legs likes stilts, their smoky wings resemble a car windshield in need of a good wash. They congregate around bodies of water and engage in courtship rituals in which the males flex their Popeye legs to attract mates.

Entomologist Neal Evenhuis of the Bishop Museum in Hawaii discovered and named the Popeye flies, the latest of 621 fly species he’s described in his career. He spotted them while on an insect collecting expedition to Tahiti in 2006.

http://www.latimes.com/news/science/...,6859547.story
 
Old August 10th, 2013 #43
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New shark species discovered off SC coast

Published: August 9, 2013 Updated 7 hours ago


William"Trey" Diggers examines a Carolina hammerhead shark.

By Sammy Fretwell — [email protected]

Scientists have discovered a new species of shark in the ocean off South Carolina and have named it for the region where it was found.

The “Carolina hammerhead,” thought to reach 11 feet long and weigh about 400 pounds, has been identified cruising the waters at Bull’s Bay north of Charleston, St. Helena Sound near Beaufort and in the Charleston harbor.

But biologists suspect these hammerheads occur worldwide, since evidence of them has been found in the past from Brazil to the Indian Ocean. The number of Carolina hammerheads is thought to be small.

“It is a distinct species,’’ said William “Trey” Driggers, a marine scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s fisheries division.

Driggers, a 45-year-old Sumter native and Clemson University graduate, was among a team of scientists with NOAA, the University of South Carolina, the University of New Orleans and the S.C. Department of Natural Resources who made the discovery after more than a decade of research.

Much of the work was done in the laboratory of USC professor Joseph Quattro, he said. Veterinarians in Columbia also collaborated on the discovery.

Driggers said it’s almost impossible to tell the difference between a Carolina hammerhead and the well-known scalloped hammerhead – except for one major distinction: the newly identified species has fewer vertebrae than its shark cousins.

Carolina hammerheads have 83 to 91 vertebrae, while scalloped hammerheads have 92 to 99 vertebrae.

While the distinction between scalloped and Carolina hammerheads is subtle, NOAA officials say it’s significant to conservation of the species. Scalloped hammerhead numbers are dwindling in some areas, so Carolina hammerhead numbers would be even fewer, they said.

Evidence of a hammerhead with fewer vertebrae dates to a single reference in a 1967 research paper, but only in the past decade have scientists obtained more detailed information. Recently, they concluded that the Carolina hammerhead is separate from the scalloped hammerhead.

Some 56 sharks used to identify the Carolina hammerhead were all collected off the South Carolina coast.

Carolina and scalloped hammerheads are the second largest sharks found in Palmetto State waters, behind the great hammerhead. The animals are distinguished by their wide, anvil-like heads.

Read more here: http://www.heraldonline.com/2013/08/...#storylink=cpy
 
Old August 10th, 2013 #44
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5,000 New Species Found in Costa Rica

Posted by Jaime Lopez on August 9, 2013

Costa Rica’s rich biodiversity is getting richer. According to a recent article published by national news daily La Nacion, researchers and environmental officials in Costa Rica discovered and classified 5,000 new species between 2011 and 2013. This discovery is part of the country’s National Biodiversity Strategy (ENB in Spanish) for 2014-2020, which is part of the United Nations Environment Program’s (UNEP) Strategic Plan for Biodiversity and the Convention on Biological Diversity. - See more at:

http://news.co.cr/5000-new-species-f....GqBINC1k.dpuf
 
Old August 10th, 2013 #45
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New beetle species discovered in Mindoro

by KD Suarez

08/07/2013


NEW SPECIES. The head of an Ancyronyx buhid photographed under a Scanning Electron Microscope.

MANILA, Philippines — Two recently-discovered species of spider water beetles have shown potential for use in water quality monitoring, a study published Tuesday, August 6, said.

The 2 new species, under the genus Ancyronyx, were both discovered in Oriental Mindoro by researchers from the Ateneo de Manila University's Department of Biology, led by Dr Hendrik Freitag.

The first one, Ancyronyx buhid, was discovered by researchers in the ancestral lands of the Buhid tribe in Roxas, Oriental Mindoro. The second one, Ancyronyx tamaraw, was identified among older collections of unidentified specimens, and was determined to live in the waters of the Tamaraw Falls in Puerto Galera.

Both species were found by the researchers, who initially intended to study the larvae of known Ancyronyx species, in clean water bodies in Mindoro.

The researchers said the Buhid Spider Water Beetle (A. buhid) is a potential bioindicator species, or an organism that can help check the health of an ecosystem.

It fulfills the criteria of bioindicators, the researchers said: A. buhid is only found in clean water ecosystems, and absent in polluted streams. It is also easily identifiable.

"The vivid and specific color patterns of adult Ancyronyx species enabling an easy identification, as well as the availability of regional identification keys for both, larvae and adults, allow their potential use as bioindicators," the paper said.

A. tamaraw, on the other hand, is "too rare to serve as a good bioindicator," they noted.

Of the 20 known species of spider water beetles, "11 of them are endemic to the Philippines and cannot be found anywhere else, indicating that the country is the diversity center of this genus," the researchers said in a media release.

"It emphasizes the importance of the country as a biodiversity hotspot at global scale," they added.

The area where the new beetle species were found is of "very high biological importance and extremely high critical conservation priority," but is facing "high socioeconomic pressure" and only subject to moderate conservation efforts.

The paper was published in the open-access journal Zookeys. - Rappler.com

http://www.rappler.com/science-natur...oro-identified
 
Old August 10th, 2013 #46
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Apparenty, there aren't too many Dr. D'Brickashaws out there discov'rin' 'n' sheeit.
__________________
"First: Do No Good." - The Hymiecratic Oath

"The man who does not exercise the first law of nature—that of self preservation — is not worthy of living and breathing the breath of life." - John Wesley Hardin
 
Old August 14th, 2013 #47
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New Species of Naked Bone-Eating Worms in Antarctica


A New Member

Bone-eating worms make a living off of the stripped skeletons of dead whales, secreting acids to dissolve their way to a good meal.

There are only five formally described species in the world, and researchers have recently added two new members—Osedax antarcticus (pictured) and O. deceptionensis.

The chances are good that this group could turn out to have many species in it, said Thomas Dahlgren, a marine biologist at Uni Research in Bergen, Norway, and a co-author of a study describing the new species.

New Osedax species turn up on almost every whale fall investigated, the study authors write in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

"Many of these whale falls have several species on them," Dahlgren added. Some are found on the whale at the same time, while others are found sequentially. "Some species are there early on in the decomposition of the bones, while other species seem to prefer later stages."

—Jane J. Lee

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...ocean-science/
 
Old August 15th, 2013 #48
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Adorable new mammal species found 'in plain sight'

By SETH BORENSTEIN | Associated Press



WASHINGTON (AP) — Imagine a raccoon with a teddy bear face that is so cute it's hard to resist, let alone overlook. But somehow science did — until now.

Researchers announced Thursday a rare discovery of a new species of mammal called the olinguito. It belongs to a grouping of large creatures that include dogs, cats and bears.

The raccoon-sized critter leaps through the trees of mountainous forests of Ecuador and Colombia at night, according to a Smithsonian researcher who has spent the past decade tracking them.

But the adorable olinguito (oh-lihn-GEE'-toe) shouldn't have been too hard to find. One of them lived in the Smithsonian-run National Zoo in the Washington for a year in a case of mistaken identity.

"It's been kind of hiding in plain sight for a long time" despite its extraordinary beauty, said Kristofer Helgen, the Smithsonian's curator of mammals.

The zoo's little critter, named Ringerl, was mistaken for a sister species, the olingo. Ringerl was shipped from zoo to zoo from 1967 to 1976: Louisville, Ky., Tucson, Ariz., Salt Lake City, Washington and New York City to try to get it to breed with other olingos.

It wouldn't.

"It turns out she wasn't fussy," Helgen said. "She wasn't the right species."

The discovery is described in a study in the journal ZooKey.

Helgen first figured olinguitos were different from olingos when he was looking at pelts and skeletons in a museum. He later led a team to South America in 2006.

"When we went to the field we found it in the very first night," said study co-author Roland Kays of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. "It was almost like it was waiting for us."

It's hard to figure how olingos and onlinguitos were confused for each other.

"How is it different? In almost every way that you can look at it," Helgen said.

Olinguitos are smaller, have shorter tails, a rounder face, tinier ears and darker bushier fur, he said.

"It looks kind of like a fuzzball ... kind of like a cross between a teddy bear and a house cat," Helgen said.

It eats fruit, weighs about 2 pounds and has one baby at a time. Helgen figures there are thousands of olinguitos in the mountainous forest, traveling through the trees at night so they are hard to see.

While new species are found regularly, usually they are tiny and not mammals, the warm-blooded advanced class of animals that have hair, live births and mammary glands in females.

Outside experts said this is not merely renaming something, but a genuine new species and a significant find, the type that hasn't happened for about 35 years.

"Most people believe there are no new species to discover, particularly of relatively large charismatic animals," said Case Western Reserve University anatomy professor Darin Croft. "This study demonstrates that this is clearly not the case."

http://news.yahoo.com/adorable-mamma...142924817.html
 
Old August 15th, 2013 #49
M.N. Dalvez
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Quote:
The worst thing about spiders is they leave webs everywhere.
Hunting spiders don't. But that's quibbling. I still think of spiders in much the same way as you seem to regard snakes; they're a wonderful, and much-and-unfairly-maligned, class of animals.

(great thread, by the way)
 
Old August 15th, 2013 #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M.N. Dalvez View Post
Hunting spiders don't. But that's quibbling. I still think of spiders in much the same way as you seem to regard snakes; they're a wonderful, and much-and-unfairly-maligned, class of animals.

(great thread, by the way)
I don't like spiders but I like what they do - for the most part. Their web pollution is on a level with birds' noise pollution. That's my beef with the octopeds.
 
Old August 15th, 2013 #51
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Quote:
1. Transition animal / human

The human is a communicating animal, but it is an animal.
The transition from animals to humans should be simple, yet it is almost impossible to achieve it peacefully. So we need a bit of insolence.

Subsequently, we use the term “human” to speak of the homo genus, and not to speak of homo sapiens for example.
The homo genus is part of the tribe homini which also includes the pan genus (chimpanzees), this tribe is included in the subfamily Homininae, of the family Hominidae of the superfamily Hominidea of the order Primate of Mammals…



This image comes from Wikipedia.

Recent studies have yielded troubling results, where the exact sources are never quoted accurately. However, these results are almost the same everywhere, from a very mysterious study.

They are as follows: 98.7% of the human (no details about origin) genome is identical to that of the chimpanzee, which means about 40 million nucleotides of about 3 billion are different. Another study, still mysterious and a little more recent (2006) cites 96%, indicating that the new percentage would reflect the missing details in the first, while another (2007) also cited 93.5% with the macaque.

http://genre.homo.over-blog.com/arti....gov/15515096?
http://www.newscientist.com/article/...n-origins.html

Note that the Y chromosomes of chimpanzee and human (unspecified) are particularly different (30%) compared to the rest of the genome.

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal...ture08700.html
http://www.wi.mit.edu/news/archives/2010/dp_0113.html
http://news.sciencemag.org/scienceno.../01/13-03.html

That is all for the chimpanzee who, is our closest “family”, even though some would say it’s the Bonobo…

As for what we consider to have been species of the genus homo through the ages, you will find a list here: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homo.
I will speak only about those that concern us.
That is to say, for now, homo sapiens and homo neanderthalensis. We will review the studies about them, and try to solve the problems we will meet in light of the conclusions previously established.

Former analysis (started in 1997) on mtDNA comparison of homo sapiens, homo neanderthalensis and the chimpanzee, show little difference in mtDNA in modern humans (all origins), which suggests that the mtDNA of modern human comes from a small group of original individuals, it is there the famous “Out of Africa” theory comes from.
It is the same among Neanderthal, who also shows little differences in the mtDNA of different individuals, that also suggests that the mtDNA of Neanderthals comes from a small group of some individuals, distinct from homo sapiens because both mtDNA – at least on the test cases – do not overlap.
In chimpanzees, the differences in the mtDNA of different individuals are more pronounced. It was concluded – rather quickly – to this that Neanderthal and sapiens were not mixed, and that modern human, from all origins came from this small group of humans from Africa. That, since mtDNA of Homo sapiens and Homo neanderthalensis is too different.

http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/homs/mtDNA.html

Recent studies affect the genome, ie, nuclear DNA, of whom we call “modern human”, and Neanderthal.
These studies give completely different results. In short, modern human shows that, relative to its origins, 0-4% of its genome comes exclusively from Neanderthal. This is where « the numbers war » begins. We will base our study on this analysis, and that is why it is not very important to speak about details now, but if you read the press on the results, you can see titles like “Neanderthals and Sapiens were mixed but the neanderthal genes is a small part of human genome since it is only 1 to 4%.”. Well no, 1-4% of the genome derived exclusively of the Neanderthal human is a huge percentage, and even disturbing, because it represents about … all the margin of the homo genus. This means in other words that people with 4% of genes that are exclusively Neanderthal are more Neanderthal than Homo sapiens. But no one will tell that, because the 4% are European, and the 0% are African, and then the whole theory is to review and in addition the results are terribly embarrassing.

http://news.discovery.com/human/nean...reed-dna.html?
http://www.eva.mpg.de/neandertal/

Thus, some other articles, perhaps more honest, will tell you that our (whose?) Genome is 99.7% identical to that of Neanderthals. Indeed, it takes a different way, but these articles will avoid to talk about the 0-4% at the same time, or, with different and very imprecise words, and more and more articles shows the study as a bad news: “This sequencing has to duplicate the genome and comparing it to ours (whose?), they found that 99.7% of the Neanderthal genome was identical and that 1-4% of our DNA would come from Neanderthal. “
http://atala.fr/2012/09/24/b-the-homo-genus-en/
 
Old August 19th, 2013 #52
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Scientists find 40 new species of Tahitian beetles
Posted 19 August 2013, 10:22 AEST

A group of entomologists has found more than 40 new species of beetles on the steep slopes of the Tahitian mountains. The team hiked into areas only accessible from helicopter drop-off points, and never before visited by scientists. Tahiti is home to some of the most diverse insect populations in the world.

A group of entomologists has found more than 40 new species of beetles on the steep slopes of the Tahitian mountains.

The team hiked into areas only accessible from helicopter drop-off points, and never before visited by scientists.

Tahiti is home to some of the most diverse insect populations in the world.

Professor James Liebherr from Cornell University in New York led the expedition and says it's uncommon to have so many different kinds of beetles in one place.

“The significance in my mind is that the amount of diversity in Tahiti is all restricted to Tahiti.

"They are all endemic species.

"You go to any particular ridges that make up the volcano Tahiti Nui, and there’s been extensive erosion and many of these ridges are quite isolated, and you go ridge to ridge, even then you find different species," he told Pacific Beat.

“The older volcano on Tahiti is only 1.4 million years old and we’ve discovered over 100 species there, so these things are clicking along at a very rapid rate."

Professor Liebherr believes many of the beetles can be traced back to one found in Australia.

“My hypothesis is that it's a very, very common species found across Australia.

"It has wings, it flies, you could be in Sydney or in Perth...it doesn’t matter, it’s everywhere.”

"But when you get back to these island systems the flight wings have been lost, evolutionarily and at that point the ranges become much smaller."

"They become homebodies, they can’t fly, they simply stay where they are and the populations diverge.”

The group didn't discover any hybrid species, because they tend to stay in one place and breed with their neighbours.

"You’ll have small populations, perhaps on a ridge constrained by a forest-type or levels of precipitation or particular tree species and they don’t occur anywhere else, and as the slopes fall away in between they’re left high and dry,” Professor Liebherr says.

"We also found on this trip that there were other things that specialise on wet rock faces, so they're living between the layers of volcanic rock where springs are coming out of the ground.

"Other ones are specific to particular types of vegetation and seem not to be found on other things. and so they're very, very specific ecologically."

Professor Leibherr says it’s highly likely there are many more species to be discovered in Tahiti.

“There are four major massifs in the south end of Tahiti Nui that no entomologist has ever been on, so the work certainly hasn’t been done.

"I think we’re about halfway there.”

http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/int...eetles/1177890

[notice that all these discoveries are made by WHITE MEN (non-jews) in colored areas, typcially central america or asia. jews arent interested in this stuff because you can't swindle animals, birds, fish or insects.]
 
Old August 25th, 2013 #53
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Hemiscyllium halmahera: New Species of ‘Walking’ Shark from Indonesia


(Just kidding. The new species doesn't look anything like this)

http://www.sci-news.com/biology/scie...sia-01335.html
 
Old August 30th, 2013 #54
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New 'Walking' Shark Species Caught on Video
By By Douglas Main, Staff Writer | LiveScience.com – 5 hrs ago



A new species of "walking" shark has been discovered in a reef off a remote Indonesian island.

These sharks don't always rely on "walking" to move about — often, they only appear to touch the seafloor as they swim using their pectoral and dorsal fins in a walklike gait, said Fahmi (who only goes by one name), a shark researcher at the Indonesian Institute of Science who wasn't involved in the study describing the species. In the video of the newfound walking shark, however, the animal is clearly touching the seafloor. [Video: New Shark "Walks" Along Reef]

http://news.yahoo.com/walking-shark-...180316645.html
 
Old September 2nd, 2013 #55
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Several new species found around remote WA coast

By science and technology correspondent Jake Sturmer

Sun 1 Sep 2013


One of several several new species found living around Western Australia's remote Kimberley coast.

Scientists believe they have discovered several new species of creatures around Western Australia's remote Kimberley coast.

The CSIRO-led team spent 11 days mapping the King George River region near the state's northern tip.

Dr John Keesing said the team gathered around 3,500 specimens as part of the most comprehensive survey undertaken in the Kimberley.

"We surveyed from the freshwater habitat, right up at the base of the King George River falls, right out through the estuary and to Lesueur Island," he said.

WA Museum curator Andrew Hosie and his colleagues have spent the last few weeks studying their bounty, analysing what is new to science.

"At the moment it's early days with ... working out exactly which ones they are," Mr Hosie said.

"But certainly in the crabs and the shrimp there are going to be a few new species."

Scientists say this knowledge is crucial, with large parts of the area set to become a marine park and the region being home to vast natural gas reserves.

"You can't plan for multiple uses of the marine environment unless you know what habitats are there and what diversity exists in the region," Dr Keesing said.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-0...-coast/4927222
 
Old September 2nd, 2013 #56
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Blue-balled monkeys discovered (2007)? Am I making it up? Or is it all too real?

http://news.discovery.com/animals/to...ies-130523.htm

I think blue-balled monkeys would make an excellent Sy-Fy horror movie predator.
 
Old September 2nd, 2013 #57
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Old September 2nd, 2013 #58
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15 new bird species discovered in Amazon
PTI Aug 29, 2013, 03.38PM IST

WASHINGTON: The Amazon rain-forest, a well-known epicentre of biodiversity, has offered another treasure trove — 15 new bird species.

An international team of researchers coordinated by ornithologist Bret Whitney of the LSU Museum of Natural Science, or LSUMNS in Louisiana US, has published 15 species of birds previously unknown to science.

The formal description of these birds has been printed in a special volume of the "Handbook of the Birds of the World" series. Not since 1871 have so many new species of birds been introduced under a single cover.

"Birds are, far and away, the best-known group of vertebrates, so describing a large number of uncatalogued species of birds in this day and age is unexpected, to say the least," said Whitney.

"But what's so exciting about this presentation of 15 new species from the Amazon all at once is, first, highlighting how little we really know about species diversity in Amazonia, and second, showing how technological advances have given us new tool-sets for discovering and comparing naturally occurring, cohesive ('monophyletic') populations with other, closely related populations," said Whitney said.

Amazonia is home to far more species of birds — approximately 1,300 — and more species per unit area, than any other biome, researchers said.

Technological advances such as satellite imagery, digital recordings of vocalisations, DNA analysis and high-powered computation power have taken the age of discovery to the next level, and were key ingredients in the discovery of these new species, they said.

However, such discoveries still depend on exploration of remote areas of the Amazon rain-forest, just as they did a century ago.

http://articles.timesofindia.indiati...on-rain-forest
 
Old September 2nd, 2013 #59
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Electric fish - more than one variety! who knew?

http://newswatch.nationalgeographic....d-differently/
 
Old September 2nd, 2013 #60
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I see you as an intrepid traveling zoologist in a past life.
 
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