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Old December 5th, 2013 #81
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Default More WWI remains discovered in France

The body of a second Ulster soldier has been uncovered in France, as roadworks continue ahead of the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War.

The French authorities are currently carrying out the major infrastructure project in the vicinity of Thiepval Wood, where some of the most famous battles took place.

On November 21 they discovered remains of a soldier along with a Royal Irish Rifles badge close to the Ulster Tower – a memorial to Ulster soldiers who died in the trenches.

Now it has emerged a second body has also been discovered.

The Somme Association has said there is a strong indication that he was a member of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.

Last night, Carol Walker, director of the Somme Heritage Centre in Newtownards, told the Belfast Telegraph: "The second soldier was found late on the evening of Wednesday, November 27.

"Further items of equipment were also recovered. We can't release the details, but he has been positively

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/ne...-29807514.html
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Old December 9th, 2013 #82
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Default Remains of a 900 Year Old Estate discovered by archaeologists

The excavations were carried out at the entrance to Ramla, in an area where a bridge is slated to be constructed as part of the new Highway 44 being paved by the Netivei Israel Company * This is the first time that a fountain has been discovered outside the known wealthier districts of Old Ramla

Remains of an affluent estate that had a fountain in its garden were recently unearthed during the course of excavations in Ramla. The excavations were conducted south of Highway 44 as preparatory work by the Netivei Israel Company, prior to the construction of a graded separation over the railroad tracks and along the existing route where drivers suffer from a bottle neck and very long delays during rush hour.

A bridge and ramps will be built above the Lod–Na‘an railway line in the region where the excavations took place. They will link Highway 44 with the cities of Ramla and Lod, while eliminating the traffic lights in the area of the project. A spokesperson for the Netivei Israel Company explains that the archaeological excavations there were part of the preparatory work within the framework of which traffic was detoured outside the area of the project and will include the construction of a new road and a bridge above an existing road and an active railway line. Approximately 250 million shekels will be invested in the project that is scheduled for completion in another two and a half years.



Two residential rooms were exposed of a wealthy estate that was built of ashlar stones. Archaeologists date the structure to the Fatimid period (late tenth century and first half of the eleventh century CE). A fountain made of mosaic covered with plaster and stone slabs was uncovered west of the building. A system of pipes consisting of terra cotta sections and connectors made of store jars led to the fountain. A large cistern and a system of pipes and channels that was used to convey water were discovered next to the residential building. A smithy’s forge built of bricks and used for manufacturing iron tools was exposed c. 20 meters south of the structure.
According to Hagit Torgë, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority:

“It seems that a private building belonging to a wealthy family was located there and that the fountain was used for ornamentation. This is the first time that a fountain has been discovered outside the known, more affluent quarters of Old Ramla. Most of the fountains that we are aware of from this period in Ramla were concentrated around the White Mosque, which was the center of the Old City of Ramla. In addition, this is the first time that the fountain’s plumbing was discovered completely intact. The pipes of other fountains did not survive the earthquakes that struck the country in 1033 and 1068 CE”.

It seems the entire area was abandoned in the mid-eleventh century CE, probably in the wake of the earthquake.

Ramla was established at the beginning of the eighth century CE. Its founding is ascribed to the ruler Suleiman Ibn ‘Abd al-Malik, and it was built as the district capital (Jund Filastin) and in certain periods its importance even eclipsed that of Jerusalem. Ramla grew and expanded during the Abbasid and Fatimid periods, and it was an important economic center in Israel as a result of its strategic location on the road from Cairo to Damascus and from Yafo to Jerusalem.

Numerous oil lamps, a baby’s rattle and parts of dolls made of bone were discovered in the excavation area.

Upon completion of the archaeological excavation, the fountain, which was in an excellent state of preservation, was removed from the area and was relocated in the Pool of the Arches compound in the city where it will be displayed.

http://www.heritagedaily.com/2013/12...logists/100437
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Old December 9th, 2013 #83
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Default 1400-year-old Buddhist temple discovered in China

BEIJING: A 1,400-year-old Buddhist temple, built during the Northern Qi Dynasty, has been discovered in north China's Shanxi Province, which arcahelogists say may help shed light on the early Buddha carvings. The shrine, enclosed by walls carved with Buddha niches, is part of the Tongzi Temple complex secluded on a mountain near the city of Taiyuan- the capital of Shanxi.

The structure was built in 556 AD during the rule of Northern Qi Dynasty (550-557 AD), a booming period for Buddhism, said researchers with the Institute of Archaeology of Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (IA CASS). "The structure is the only one of its kind ever found in China and it sheds light on early Buddha carvings," Li Yuqun, researcher with the IA CASS and lead archaeologist on the excavation was quoted by state-run Xinhua news agency as saying.

Though destroyed in a war in 1,117 AD, the temple has yielded a batch of well-preserved statues. One of its walls was carved with a Buddha figure of over 20 meters in height. It was unrecognisable, but the archaeologists unearthed some remnants that suggested its original look. The structure also houses a 2.6-meter mural dating from the Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD), which archaeologists believe is of great value.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/...w/27082627.cms
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Old December 21st, 2013 #84
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Default 6,000-year-old tombs unearthed in northeast Vietnam


Hundreds of artifacts found at the 6,000-year-old relic in Bac Kan, aside from the six tombs

Tombs built 6,000 years have just been excavated in Bac Kan Province in the Northeast region, reported newspaper The Thao & Van Hoa (Sports & Culture) this week.

Six tombs have been dug up at the province’s Na Mo Cave in Huong Ne Commune, Ngan Son District, 180 kilometers north of Hanoi.

Local archaeologists used the absolute dating method on snail shells found inside the tomb to determine that the relics dated back more than 6,000 years ago.

The items, of which four have been exposed to the open air, were found together with broken skeletons excluding skulls and teeth, said excavation team leader Professor Trinh Nang Chung of the Hanoi-based Institute of Archaeology.

That the team couldn’t find any traces of the human skulls and teeth at the site raised the hypothesis among the scientists that the corpses were victim to “headhunting” practices in which the early peoples of Southeast Asia would steal skulls to rob the dead of their power.

Two skeletons among the six were buried with cutting tools made of stone as burial belongings. The tombs were made of stones.

The discovery is considered new evidence and a major stepping stone in the study of the prehistory of Bac Kan in particular and Vietnam in general since the cave is known to have been the home of many generations of early humans.

According to researchers and scientists, the first residents of the cave were of the Hoa Binh – Bac Son culture (4,000 BC – 5,000 BC), whereas the last ones had lived there during the late Stone Age – early Iron Age.

Aside from the cutting tools, hundreds of artifacts made of ceramic and stone, including jewelry, tools, ochre (a soil of yellow color, mixed with water to decorate the bodies of both the dead and the living) that represent the two cultures have been unearthed at the site.

In addition, scientists have collected many samples of spores for further research on the ancient ecological environment of the area.

http://www.thanhniennews.com/index/p...t-vietnam.aspx
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Old December 28th, 2013 #85
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Default 1,000-year-old vineyards discovered in Spain

Traces of ancient vineyards that date back 1,000 years were discovered in the terraced fields of a medieval village in Spain, according to a new archaeological study.

Researchers from the University of the Basque Country found evidence that fields within the medieval settlement of Zaballa were once intensely used to grow grape vines.

"Archaeo-botanical studies of seed remains found in the excavations and pollen studies have provided material evidence of the existence of vine cultivation in a relatively early period like the 10th century," study author Juan Antonio Quirós-Castillo said in a statement. [ In Photos: Archaeology Around the World ]

The researchers' examination of the fields, which are still visible in the landscape, suggests they were more agriculturally suited to growing vines, rather than cereal crops, he added. The archaeologists also unearthed metal tools that were likely used to maintain the ancient vineyards.

The village of Zaballa was abandoned in the 15th century, largely after local lords operating under a newly created rent-seeking system drove out many of the town's settlers. Zaballa is one of more than 300 deserted settlements collectively known as Araba-Alava. Today, archaeologists from the University of the Basque Country are trying to reconstruct the region's rural heritage by combing the remains of these deserted settlements.

"The important thing is not just their number, but that in the decade that we have been working on this project, extensive work has been done on nearly half a dozen of them, and work at other levels has been done on nearly a hundred," Quirós-Castillo said.

As such, the researchers are compiling some of the most important archaeological records of medieval history throughout northern Spain, he said. "In other words, to see how the peasant community itself gradually adapts to the political and economic changes that take place in the medieval context in which these places are located," he added.

Quirós-Castillo and his colleagues also studied another abandoned settlement in Araba-Alava called Zornotegi. They discovered that the terraced fields in this village were devoted to cultivating cereals and grains.

"Zornotegi has a completely different history," Quirós-Castillo said. "Even though it was founded at more or less the same time, it is a much more egalitarian social community in which such significant social differences are not observed, and nor is the action of manorial powers which, in some way, undermined the balance of the community."

The researchers are pushing for the Araba-Alava settlements to be regarded as part of archaeological heritage, in order to preserve their rich history.

"The space for traditional crops, still easily recognizable in the landscapes closest to us, are historical spaces brimming with explanatory significance to help us understand the societies of the past; indeed, they require attention which they have not had until now," Quirós-Castillo said.

The discoveries were reported in a special issue of the journal Quaternary International.

http://www.nbcnews.com/science/vinta...ain-2D11812515
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Old February 2nd, 2014 #87
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Old February 13th, 2014 #89
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Treasure trove of fossils found in Canada will 'significantly' change understanding of evolution

Already, 50 animal species have been unearthed

By Mike Krumboltz, Yahoo News

Old bones galore!

A massive trove of fossils discovered by researchers in British Columbia, Canada, will "significantly increase our understanding of animal evolution," according to the group's lead researcher Jean-Bernard Caron.

The discovery was made in 2012, but was published only this week in the scientific journal Nature Communications.

Already, 50 animal species have been unearthed.

The find was made at Kootenay National Park, about 26 miles from Yoho National Park, where some of the planet's earliest fossils were discovered more than a century ago, according to a statement from the Royal Ontario Museum.

"The rate at which we are finding animals — many of which are new — is astonishing," Caron told the Daily Mail. "There is a significant possibility that we'll eventually find more species here than at the original Yoho site, and potentially more than from anywhere else in the world."

Researchers believe the find "will greatly further our understanding of the sudden explosion of animal life during the Cambrian Period," which National Geographic describes as having produced "the most intense burst of evolution ever known." BBC classifies the Cambrian period as beginning 545 million years ago and ending 495 million years ago.

The exact location is being kept a secret to prevent amateur diggers and lookie-loos from potentially damaging more yet-to-be discovered treasures.

"We were already aware of the presence of some Burgess Shale fossils in Kootenay National Park," geologist Robert Gaines said in a statement. "We had a hunch that if we followed the formation along the mountain topography into new areas with the right rock types, maybe, just maybe, we would get lucky — though we never in our wildest dreams thought we’d track down a motherload like this."

There are timeline implications to the find, as well. The Royal Ontario Museum explains that some of the species that were recently at Kootenay were also seen "in China’s famous Chengjiang fossil beds, which are 10 million years older."

The implication being that the "worldwide distribution of Cambrian animals, as well as their longevity, might have been underestimated," according to the museum.

Canoe.ca reports that researchers plan to return this summer.

Follow Mike Krumboltz on Twitter (@mikekrumboltz).

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow...144408422.html
 
Old February 19th, 2014 #90
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Default 2,300-year-old village discovered on road leading to Jerusalem

Dig reveals small rural settlement with stone houses; each building housed a single nuclear family, consisted of several rooms and an open courtyard.



Work to uncover the remnants of an approximately 2300-year-old rural settlement that was discovered on a road leading to Jerusalem in August 2013 was completed recently, the Israel Antiquities Authority announced Tuesday.

The village was occupied for approximately two centuries during the Second Temple Period and is located near the 'Burma Road' (not far from Mitzpe Harel).



The excavations, which covered about 750 square meters, revealed a small rural settlement with a few stone houses and a network of narrow alleys. Each building, which probably housed a single nuclear family, consisted of several rooms and an open courtyard.

According to Irina Zilberbod, excavation director on behalf of the Antiquities Authority, "The rooms generally served as residential and storage rooms, while domestic tasks were carried out in the courtyards".



The excavations have shown that the site reached the height of its development in the Hellenistic period (during the third century BCE), when Judea was ruled by the Seleucid monarchy following Alexander the Great, and that it was abandoned at the end of the Hasmonean dynasty.

It is not known why the site was abandoned, but it is probably related to economic problems and not to a violent incident. As Jerusalem Regional Archaeologist Dr. Yuval Baruch explains, "The phenomenon of villages and farms being abandoned at the end of the Hasmonean dynasty or the beginning of Herod the Great's succeeding rule is one that we are familiar with from many rural sites in Judea, and it may be related to Herod's massive building projects in Jerusalem, particularly the construction of the Temple Mount, and the mass migration of villagers to the capital to work on these projects."

The excavations yielded numerous and varied finds from all occupation periods, including basalt and limestone grinding and milling tools for domestic use, pottery cooking pots, jars for storing liquids (oil and wine,) pottery oil lamps for domestic use, and over sixty coins, including coins from the reigns of the Seleucid King Antiochus III and the Hasmonean King Alexander Jannaeus.


http://www.jpost.com/National-News/2...rusalem-341746
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Old February 19th, 2014 #91
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Default Mammoth tusk discovered, retrieved from Seattle construction pit



This image provided by the Burke Museum and taken on Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014, shows what museum officials believe is mammoth tusk that was uncovered by construction workers in the south Lake Union area of Seattle. According to the museum, the ancient elephant relatives lived in Washington until approximately 10,000 years ago and their fossils have been found throughout western Washington. (AP Photo/Burke Museum)

February 16, 2014 (SEATTLE) -- A fossilized mammoth tusk discovered in a Seattle construction site was retrieved Friday evening from a 30-foot-deep pit to the sound of cheers and clicking from people taking pictures.

Scientists and construction crews used a crane to retrieve and hoist the tusk, which was placed on a pallet, encased in plaster and covered in blankets, to a waiting flat-bed truck. The tusk headed to its new home a few miles away at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture on the University of Washington's Seattle campus, where it will be preserved, studied and eventually put on display.

The tusk, believed to be of a Columbian mammoth, was measured at 8.5-feet long after it was fully exposed overnight. It's between 20,000 and 60,000 years old and with the plaster encasing could weigh up to 500 pounds, said Christian Sidor, a paleontologist from the Burke Museum.

The tusk is water-logged, and scientists say properly restoring and preserving it could take at least a year.

Construction workers found the tusk Tuesday about 30 feet below street level, thinking at first that it might be a pipe or a root. The company building a 118-unit apartment complex at the site has nearly stopped construction to accommodate the scientists.

No more fossils were found during the overnight dig, the museum said Friday.

"Generally tusks like these are the last thing left" after animals and time remove the bones and the rest of the creature, Sidor said.

The tusk's fate was entirely up to the landowner, who decided to donate it to the Burke Museum. The costs of the delay aren't known yet, said Scott Koppelman of AMLI Residential, which also owns apartment complexes to the south and west of the construction site.

The benefits to the community "outweigh the costs," he said Thursday.

Mammoths and mastodons were ancient elephant relatives that roamed North American lands that were not covered in ice. Both became extinct as glaciers retreated at the end of the Ice Age. Columbian mammoths grew to 12 feet at the shoulder, or about the size of today's Asian elephants, the museum said.

Fossilized mammoth remains have been found numerous times in the Seattle area and across the state, so much so that the Columbian mammoth is the state's official fossil.

Still, most of the Burke Museum's collection is fragments. The tusk found this week would be one of the largest and most intact specimens found.

The museum's collection has 25 mammoth fossils from King County, including a tooth that was found a few blocks away from the tusk when the Mercer Street on-ramp to Interstate 5 was built years ago.

Children at a daycare next door and adults all cheered as the pallet hung over the construction site.

At the day care, there was a hand-made sign that said, "Woolly U B my Valentine?"

http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?sec...rld&id=9434411
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Old February 20th, 2014 #92
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Default 2,000 unmarked graves discovered on University of Mississippi Medical Center campus

The caskets likely contain patients from the State Lunatic Asylum, which once stood on the campus. The grim discoveries have forced the college to revise its expansion plans.



The caskets likely contain patients from the State Lunatic Asylum, which once stood on the campus. The grim discoveries have forced the college to revise its expansion plans.

Surveyors plotting the expansion of a Mississippi medical school have come upon a chilling discovery: as many as 2,000 unmarked graves.

The bodies likely belong to the State Lunatic Asylum that opened on the University of Mississippi Medical Center campus in Jackson in 1855, said Jack Mazurak, a spokesman for the school.
The grim finds began roughly a year and a half ago when the school came across 66 graves. The university’s administration planned to exhume the bodies and reinter them in an on-campus cemetery.

But exhuming and relocating all the bodies in this month's massive discovery is too costly — around $3 million — so they will likely remain in place.

“It was a few (bodies) at a time at first and it seemed manageable,” said Mazurak. “Then it became more and more and more.”
The caskets — all lined up in a row — forced school planners to build a parking garage on a new site. Plans are being revised for an $11 million American Cancer Society Hope Lodge and Children’s Justice Center, as well.T

he undeveloped cemetery site has turned out to be an ideal setting for University of Mississippi archaeology students. “Really it was a great learning experience,” Mazurak said of one of the gravesites.

The insane asylum opened opened in 1855 and housed 150 patients. Eight years later the Union's 46th Indiana Infantry Regiment bivouacked there before laying waste to Jackson, according to the
Following the Civil War, the asylum expanded to house 300 patients. Later, a fertilizer factory and tuberculosis sanatorium were built nearby.



The asylum moved in 1935 and the state-owned land was designated to become the medical school in the 1940s, Mazurak said.

He added that the news has resulted in calls from all over the country from people who believe they might have relatives buried at the site.

One reporter for the Clarion Ledger wrote his great-grandmother might be among the dead.

“According to family accounts, she became so obsessed with the Holy Bible, she tried following it perfectly, and lost her mind,” Gerry Glenn Jones wrote.

Mazurak said the experience was another example of life in the Deep South.

“In Mississippi, the past tends to intersect with the present,” he said.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/nati...#ixzz2tr4EJu5l
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Old February 20th, 2014 #93
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I would be interested to know if someone has any updates on this: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...ng-Greece.html (August 2013)
Can't find anything new on the web...
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Old February 21st, 2014 #94
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Default Ancient forests exposed by storms along the coast of Wales



The recent storms that battered the UK have offered a glimpse into the past of the Welsh coastline, by washing away peat and revealing the stunning remains of ancient forests.

Gnarled tree stumps and roots, believed to be dating from the Bronze Age, have become visible for the first time on the shore near the village of Borth, Ceredigion, Mid Wales.

Now, remains of oak and pine trees preserved by peat protrude on the beach near Ynyslas - the most northern section of coast to be revealed in living memory, the Daily Mail reported.

Legend has it that the region was home to the fertile kingdom of Cantre’r Gwaelod, or the Sunken Hundred, that was lost under the sea when Seithenyn, one of the two princes guarding the area got drunk, and left the area prone to the floodgates of the sea.

The affect of the recent weather is also visible further down the west coast of the UK, as the heavy winds and rain shifted swathes shingle and sand on Cornish beaches, to reveal more so-called “submerged forests”.

Large trunks of oak, beech and pine in peat beds are now also visible near Penzance in Mount's Bay.

For centuries, experts had known that the forests existed, but they are rarely exposed as they are now on Portreath beach and in Daymer Bay.

Using radiocarbon dating on the peat beds, geologists believe extensive forests extended across Mount's Bay between 4,000 and 6,000 years ago when hunter gatherers were giving way to farming communities.

Frank Howie, Cornwall Wildlife Trustee and chair of the county's Geoconservation Group, said: “The forest bed at Wherry Town on the west side of Penzance has not been exposed to this extent for 40 years or more.

“At Chyandour to the east of Penzance rooted stumps are exposed in situ in peaty soils and massive trunks have been washed out onto the rocky foreshore.

"These forests were growing four or five thousand years when climate was slightly warmer than today.

“They were not flooded at the end of the last ice age which happened around 12,000 years ago.”

Submerged forests are evidence of changes in the bay as sea level has risen since the end of the last glaciation, he added.

The Mount's Bay forest bed is one of the 117 County Geology Sites monitored and managed by the Cornwall Geoconservation Group in conjunction with the Trust and its volunteers.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...l-9142719.html
 
Old February 22nd, 2014 #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn Cannon View Post


The recent storms that battered the UK have offered a glimpse into the past of the Welsh coastline, by washing away peat and revealing the stunning remains of ancient forests.

Gnarled tree stumps and roots, believed to be dating from the Bronze Age, have become visible for the first time on the shore near the village of Borth, Ceredigion, Mid Wales.

Now, remains of oak and pine trees preserved by peat protrude on the beach near Ynyslas - the most northern section of coast to be revealed in living memory, the Daily Mail reported.

Legend has it that the region was home to the fertile kingdom of Cantre’r Gwaelod, or the Sunken Hundred, that was lost under the sea when Seithenyn, one of the two princes guarding the area got drunk, and left the area prone to the floodgates of the sea.

The affect of the recent weather is also visible further down the west coast of the UK, as the heavy winds and rain shifted swathes shingle and sand on Cornish beaches, to reveal more so-called “submerged forests”.

Large trunks of oak, beech and pine in peat beds are now also visible near Penzance in Mount's Bay.

For centuries, experts had known that the forests existed, but they are rarely exposed as they are now on Portreath beach and in Daymer Bay.

Using radiocarbon dating on the peat beds, geologists believe extensive forests extended across Mount's Bay between 4,000 and 6,000 years ago when hunter gatherers were giving way to farming communities.

Frank Howie, Cornwall Wildlife Trustee and chair of the county's Geoconservation Group, said: “The forest bed at Wherry Town on the west side of Penzance has not been exposed to this extent for 40 years or more.

“At Chyandour to the east of Penzance rooted stumps are exposed in situ in peaty soils and massive trunks have been washed out onto the rocky foreshore.

"These forests were growing four or five thousand years when climate was slightly warmer than today.

“They were not flooded at the end of the last ice age which happened around 12,000 years ago.”

Submerged forests are evidence of changes in the bay as sea level has risen since the end of the last glaciation, he added.

The Mount's Bay forest bed is one of the 117 County Geology Sites monitored and managed by the Cornwall Geoconservation Group in conjunction with the Trust and its volunteers.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...l-9142719.html

That's really amazing.....some photos:

















Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz2tzR9NFjf
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Old February 22nd, 2014 #96
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Default Oldest fortified settlement in North America discovered in Georgia

http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2014...8611393023726/


Map of French Florida from 1611. Credit: Fletcher Crow



DARIEN, Ga., Feb. 21 (UPI) -- The oldest fortified settlement in North America has been discovered in Georgia, giving insights into the early colonization of the New World, researchers say.

Fort Caroline, a long-sought fort built by the French in 1564, had long been thought to have been built near modern-day Jacksonville in Florida, but researchers say its actual site has been discovered 70 miles to the north -- in Georgia.

The site is on an island at the mouth of the Altamaha River, two miles southeast of the city of Darien, they said.

"This is the oldest fortified settlement in the present United States," historian and Florida State University alumnus Fletcher Crowe said. "This fort is older than St. Augustine, considered to be the oldest continuously inhabited city in America. It's older than the Lost Colony of Virginia by 21 years; older than the 1607 fort of Jamestown by 45 years; and predates the landing of the Pilgrims in Massachusetts in 1620 by 56 years."

To make the discovery, Crowe flew to Paris and conducted research at the Bibliotheque Nationale de France, the French equivalent of the U.S. Library of Congress, where he found a number of 16th-century maps that pinpointed the location of Fort Caroline.

Some of the maps were in 16th-century French, some in Latin, some in Spanish, and some were even in English, he found.

Crowe was able to match French maps from the 16th to 18th centuries of what is today the southeastern coast of the United States with modern charts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Geological Survey.

Although the site has been confirmed, it has not yet been excavated by archaeologists, a release from Florida State University said.
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Old February 24th, 2014 #97
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Confirmed: Oldest fragment of early Earth is 4.4 billion years old.

Rock don' lie, christian niggers.

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2014/...ion-years-old/

Last edited by Alex Linder; February 24th, 2014 at 11:33 AM.
 
Old February 25th, 2014 #98
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Jae Manzel
Default 11,000-year-old Colony Under Baltic Sea Unearthed

http://www.newindianexpress.com/worl...e#.UwxDkc769_w

In a scintillating find, an 11,000-year-old settlement has been unearthed under Baltic Sea near Sweden.

This is a collection of well preserved artifacts left by nomads some 11,000 years ago.

The site was in fact some sort of a dump in which nomadic Swedes discarded objects, according to a report in The Local.

Billed as 'Sweden's Atlantis', the site is buried 52 feet below the surface at Hano, a sandy bay off the coast of Skane County in Sweden.

The findings include wood pieces, flint tools, animal horns, ropes, a harpoon carving made from an animal bone and an ancient cattle which became extinct in the early 1600s, added the report.

“There's wood and antlers and other implements that were thrown in there,” Bjorn Nilsson, archaeology professor at Sodertorn University in Sweden was quoted as saying.

“If the settlement was on dry land, we would only have the stone-based things, nothing organic,” added Nilsson who team is excavating the site for a potential burial site.
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Old February 25th, 2014 #99
Jae Manzel
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Join Date: Aug 2013
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Jae Manzel
Default Sierra Leone diamond: $6.2 million, 153-carat diamond unearthed!

http://www.examiner.com/article/sier...mond-unearthed



What is now being referred to as the "Sierra Leone diamond" was officially revealed on Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, and it is one for the ages. Yahoo News reported on Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, that the 153-carat diamond was dug up this past week and it is one of the world's finest as the Sierra Leone diamond has a worth of $6.2 million.

"This 153.44-carat diamond is one of the finest diamonds to be found in Sierra Leone in the last 10 years," the National Minerals Agency said in a statement.

The Sierra Leone diamond has a D+ grade on the D-to-Z diamond color scale. This means it has almost no yellow tiny or nitrogen impurities. According to what it could be compared to, the agency states that only "fancy diamonds such as blue or pink" could match or surpass it in terms of price.

"The diamond is a cleavage in terms of shape and the clarity is of very high quality," the statement added.

"In other words, this is a premium stone as a result of its colour and clarity, and had it been an octahedron-shaped stone, it could have almost doubled the price of $6 million."


It was officially found in the eastern district of Kono. The 153.44 carats of the Sierra Leone diamond make it a good bit larger than the largest find of last year. 2013's biggest diamond measured in at 125-carats and was found around the same area.

Sierra Leone is no stranger to beautiful treasures as it is known for diamonds, gold, titanium ore, bauxite, and many others. Unfortunately, it it still one of the poorest countries in the world thanks to a decade-lond civil war that ended back in 2002.
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Originally Posted by Kajtimar View Post
The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
Old February 25th, 2014 #100
Jae Manzel
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Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,066
Jae Manzel
Default 1.4 million Western Han Dynasty coins found in Inner Mongolia

http://www.ecns.cn/2014/02-25/102305.shtml

Archaeologists in the Inner Mongolia autonomous region have found a coin casting workshop and more than 1.4 million ancient coins dating back to the Western Han Dynasty (206 BC-AD 24), Guangming Daily reported on Tuesday.

According to Inner Mongolia Institute of Archaeology, which made the excavation from August 2012 to October 2013, the ruins are located in an ancient city in Erdos.

The new discoveries provided important information for the study of local economic and social development in ancient times.
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The rest of you are nothing more than a livestock – you were created for us: to serve in that or the other way.
 
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