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Old 1 Week Ago #1
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Post Rock 'n' Roll icon Chuck Berry dead

Rock 'n' roll icon and musical master Chuck Berry died Saturday at his home west of St. Louis, Missouri, authorities confirmed. He was 90.

The guitarist and musican defined the art form's joy and rebellion in such classics as "Johnny B. Goode," ''Sweet Little Sixteen" and "Roll Over Beethoven" in a career that spanned 7 decades and earned him countless accolades.

Emergency personnel summoned to Berry's residence by his caretaker about 12:40 p.m. found him unresponsive, police in Missouri's St. Charles County said in a statement. Attempts to revive Berry failed, and he was pronounced shortly before 1:30 p.m., police said.

A police spokeswoman, Val Joyner, said she had no additional details about the death of Berry, calling him "really a legend."

CHUCK BERRY TRIBUTES FLOOD IN AFTER NEWS OF ROCK LEGEND'S DEATH

Berry's core repertoire was some three dozen songs, his influence incalculable, from the Beatles and the Rolling Stones to virtually any group from garage band to arena act that called itself rock 'n roll. While Elvis Presley gave rock its libidinous, hip-shaking image, Berry was the auteur, setting the template for a new sound and way of life. Well before the rise of Bob Dylan, Berry wedded social commentary to the beat and rush of popular music.

"He was singing good lyrics, and intelligent lyrics, in the '50s when people were singing, "Oh, baby, I love you so,'" John Lennon once observed.

Berry, in his late 20s before his first major hit, crafted lyrics that spoke to the teenagers of the day and remained fresh decades later. "Sweet Little Sixteen" captured rock 'n' roll fandom, an early and innocent ode to the young girls later known as "groupies." ''School Day" told of the sing-song trials of the classroom ("American history and practical math; you're studying hard, hoping to pass...") and the liberation of rock 'n' roll once the day's final bell rang.

"Roll Over Beethoven" was an anthem to rock's history-making power, while "Rock and Roll Music" was a guidebook for all bands that followed ("It's got a back beat, you can't lose it"). "Back in the U.S.A." was a black man's straight-faced tribute to his country at a time there was no guarantee Berry would be served at the drive-ins and corner cafes he was celebrating.

"Everything I wrote about wasn't about me, but about the people listening," he once said.

"Johnny B. Goode," the tale of a guitar-playing country boy whose mother tells him he'll be a star, was Berry's signature song, the archetypal narrative for would-be rockers and among the most ecstatic recordings in the music's history. Berry can hardly contain himself as the words hurry out ("Deep down Louisiana close to New Orleans/Way back up in the woods among the evergreens") and the downpour of guitar, drums and keyboards amplifies every call of "Go, Johnny Go!"

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The song was inspired in part by Johnnie Johnson, the boogie-woogie piano master who collaborated on many Berry hits, but the

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read full article at source: http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment...ead-at-90.html
 
Old 1 Week Ago #2
Olaf Menes
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Iconic?

He was convicted of both armed robbery and transporting a female minor across state lines for the purpose of sexual exploitation.

He convinced a 14 -year old Apache Indian who was a waitress in Texas, to travel to St Louis to be a hat Check Girl in his Club. Her recollection is that he simply planned on turning her into a house whore after he had his way with her.

But somehow, the convictions would be a reputation death sentence to anyone else perpetrating those same crimes, but a Black Musician? Nope, simply made him even more popular in the thug admirable Negro Community.

And ignored by the affluent Whites who would flock to his shows in droves.
In my estimation, a one hit wonder with Johnny B Goode.

Nothing of any exceptional musical talent in my opinion.
 
Old 1 Week Ago #3
Emily Henderson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olaf Menes View Post
Iconic?

He was convicted of both armed robbery and transporting a female minor across state lines for the purpose of sexual exploitation.

He convinced a 14 -year old Apache Indian who was a waitress in Texas, to travel to St Louis to be a hat Check Girl in his Club. Her recollection is that he simply planned on turning her into a house whore after he had his way with her.

But somehow, the convictions would be a reputation death sentence to anyone else perpetrating those same crimes, but a Black Musician? Nope, simply made him even more popular in the thug admirable Negro Community.

And ignored by the affluent Whites who would flock to his shows in droves.
In my estimation, a one hit wonder with Johnny B Goode.

Nothing of any exceptional musical talent in my opinion.
Wow, I didn't know any of that.

TV forgot to mention.

But he probably dindu nuffins, it's juss Whitey tryna destroy a blah man's legacy an sheit.

Oh..wait juss a minute:

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/sea...cid=spartandhp
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Last edited by Emily Henderson; 6 Days Ago at 11:15 AM.
 
Old 1 Week Ago #4
N.B. Forrest
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He was a cut above your average nigger is some important ways - he did write numerous classic rock & roll tunes (or co-wrote: he was sued for royalties by his pianist collaborator); he was a good entertainer; was financially shrewd - but where Muh Dik was concerned, he was just anutha ooga-booga.
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