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Old June 7th, 2018 #121
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World's Oldest Footprints Discovered on Ancient Seafloor


Neil Armstrong left the first footprint on the moon, on July 20, 1969. But what about Earth — when did animals first leave footprints here?

While we don't know exactly when animals first left tracks on our planet, the oldest footprints ever found were left between 551 million and 541 million years ago during the Ediacaran period, a new study finds. That's hundreds of millions of years before dinosaurs started roaming Earth, about 245 million years ago. The new findings suggest animals evolved primitive "arms" and "legs" earlier than previously thought.

https://www.livescience.com/62755-ol...on-record.html
 
Old June 7th, 2018 #122
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First tetrapods of Africa lived within the Devonian Antarctic Circle


The first African fossils of Devonian tetrapods (four-legged vertebrates) show these pioneers of land living within the Antarctic circle, 360 million years ago.

The evolution of tetrapods from fishes during the Devonian period was a key event in our distant ancestry. Newly found fossils from the latest Devonian Waterloo Farm locality near Grahamstown in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, published today in Science, force a major reassessment of this event

https://phys.org/news/2018-06-tetrap...ircle.html#jCp
 
Old June 8th, 2018 #123
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'Monstrous' new Russian saber-tooth fossils clarify early evolution of mammal lineage


Fossils representing two new species of saber-toothed prehistoric predators have been described by researchers from the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences (Raleigh, USA) and the Vyatka Paleontological Museum (Kirov, Russia). These new species improve the scientists' understanding of an important interval in the early evolution of mammals—a time, between mass extinctions, when the roles of certain carnivores changed drastically.

https://phys.org/news/2018-06-monstr...early.html#jCp
 
Old June 14th, 2018 #124
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For 100 million years, amber freezes a tableau of Burmese bugs’ life-and-death struggle


One day in Myanmar during the Cretaceous period, a tick managed to ensnare itself in a spider web. Realizing its predicament, the tick struggled to get free. But the spider that built the web was having none of it. The spider popped over to the doomed tick and quickly wrapped it up in silk, immobilizing it for eternity.

https://news.ku.edu/2018/06/07/100-m...death-struggle
 
Old June 15th, 2018 #125
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Burmese Amber Preserves 99-Million-Year-Old Tropical Frogs


Four amber-preserved specimens of Electrorana were acquired in the area of Angbamo in Kachin Province of northern Myanmar in 2015.

They provide the earliest direct evidence of frogs living in a wet tropical forest ecosystem and are oldest-known examples of frogs preserved in amber, with the only two previous reports from Cenozoic amber deposits of the Dominican Republic.

http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology...ogs-06102.html
 
Old 4 Weeks Ago #126
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Baby snake 'frozen in time' gives insight into lost world


The fossil of a baby snake has been discovered entombed inside amber.

The creature has been frozen in time for 99 million years.

The snake lived in what is now Myanmar, during the age of the dinosaurs.

Scientists say the snake fossil is "unbelievably rare".

"This is the very first baby snake fossil that we have ever found," Prof Michael Caldwell of the University of Alberta in Canada told BBC News.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-44872148
 
Old 4 Weeks Ago #127
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New sources of melanin pigment shake up ideas about fossil animals’ colour

A rethink of how scientists reconstruct the color of fossil birds, reptiles, and dinosaurs.


Numerous ongoing investigations of fossil color have expected that fossilized granules of melanin – melanosomes – originate from the skin. In any case, new confirmation demonstrates that different tissues–, for example, the liver, lungs, and spleen – can likewise contain melanosomes, recommending that fossil melanosomes may not give data on fossil color.

https://www.techexplorist.com/new-so...-colour/15636/
 
Old 1 Week Ago #128
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Rare teeth from ancient mega-shark found on Australia beach


A rare set of teeth from a giant prehistoric mega-shark twice the size of the great white have been found on an Australian beach by a keen-eyed amateur enthusiast, scientists said Thursday.

Philip Mullaly was strolling along an area known as a fossil hotspot at Jan Juc, on the country's famous Great Ocean Road some 100 kilometres (60 miles) from Melbourne, when he made the find.

https://phys.org/news/2018-08-rare-t...ralia.html#jCp
 
Old 1 Week Ago #129
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These half-billion-year-old creatures were animals—but unlike any known today


So-called Ediacaran organisms have puzzled biologists for decades. To the untrained eye they look like fossilized plants, in tube or frond shapes up to 2 meters long. These strange life forms dominated Earth’s seas half a billion years ago, and scientists have long struggled to figure out whether they’re algae, fungi, or even an entirely different kingdom of life that failed to survive. Now, two paleontologists think they have finally established the identity of the mysterious creatures: They were animals, some of which could move around, but they were unlike any living on Earth today.

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/...ny-known-today
 
Old 4 Days Ago #130
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99-million-year-old beetle trapped in amber served as pollinator to evergreen cycads


Flowering plants are well known for their special relationship to the insects and other animals that serve as their pollinators. But, before the rise of angiosperms, another group of unusual evergreen gymnosperms, known as cycads, may have been the first insect-pollinated plants. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on August 16 have uncovered the earliest definitive fossil evidence of that intimate relationship between cycads and insects.

https://phys.org/news/2018-08-millio...green.html#jCp
 
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