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Old December 9th, 2012 #1
Steven L. Akins
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Default Are you helping to finance the Jewish takeover of America?

How did the Jews take over America?

With the money that you gave them!

A Partial List of Jewish Owned Businesses


The Home Depot founded in 1978 by Bernie Marcus, Arthur Blank (Atlanta Falcons), Ron Brill, and Pat Farrah. This is the second largest retailer in America, behind Wal-Mart. The Jewish founders retain substantial holdings in the company.

Staples Office Supply (Thomas G. Stemberg)

Office Depot (Merged with Staples, Thomas G. Stemberg)

ABC Warehouse

Circuit City (founded 1949 as Wards Appliance Store by Samuel S. Wurtzel, Jewish)

Costco Warehouses (founded 1954 by Sol Price, Jewish, as Fed Mart)

Sears/K Mart Sears was controlled nearly from its inception by the Julius Rosenwald family, and then by Max Adler, who married Sophie Rosenwald. A Significant number of the company's shares are still Jewish controlled to this day.

Signet Jewelers, Also includes the following stores: Sterling Jewelers, Kay Jewelers, Jared Jewelery, JB Robinson Jewelers, Marks & Morgan Jewelers, Belden Jewelers, Osterman Jewelers, Shaw's Jewelers, Weisfield Jewelers, LeRoy's Jewelers, Rogers Jewelers, Goodman Jewelers, and Friedlander's Jewelers

Zale Diamond Jewelry Corporation, founded by Morris Bernard Zale (Zalefsky), William Zale (Zalefsky), Samuel Kruger, and Ben Lipshy. Also included the following stores: Gordon's Jewelers, Zell Bros Jewelry, Diamond Park Fine Jewelers, and O.G. Wilson.

Academy Sports and Outdoors, founder by Max Gochman, David Gochman, current Chairman, CEO

Pottery Barn, founded by Russian-American Jew, Paul Secon, and his brother Morris in 1950

Toys R Us/Babies R Us - founded by Charles Lazarus

David's Bridal - founded by David Reisberg, owned by Leonard Green & Partners

Jo Ann Fabrics - founded by Berthold & Hilda Reich and Sigmund & Mathilda Rohrbach, owned by Leonard Green & Partners

Starbucks (Howarad D. Schultz, CEO)

Spencer Gifts (Steve Silverstein, CEO. Privately held corporation)

Stein-Mart

T J Maxx
, founded as a nameplate of Zayre Stores by Max and Morris Feldberg. owned by TJX Companies

Marshall's, owned by TJX Companies

Home Goods/Home Sense, owned by TJX Companies

Ross Dress for Less

Old Navy (Donald Fisher, founder, holds 37% of stock)

The Gap (Donald Fisher, founder, holds 37% of stock)

Banana Republic (Donald Fisher, founder, holds 37% of stock)

American Eagle Outfitters (founded 1904 by Edward Beinstein.
Current CEO J.L. Schottenstein)

Eddy Bauer

Levi's/Levi Strauss

Calvin Klein

Polo/Ralph Lauren

Max Factor, founded by Maksymilian Faktorowicz (Max Factor), a Jewish cosmetician from Poland.

Revlon

Estee Lauder

The Limited, (owned by Les Wexner), Also includes the following stores: Victoria's Secret, Pink, Bath & Body Works, Henri Bendel, C. O. Bigelow, The White Barn Candle Company, La Senza, Abercrombie & Fitch, Layne Bryant, Lerner New York, Structure, Express, Aura Science

Rue 21, CEO Robert Fisch

Bon Ton Stores (Founded by Max Grumbacher) Also includes the following stores: Elder-Beerman, Parisian, Saks Inc., Bergner's, Boston Store, Carson Pirie Scott, Herbergers, Younkers, Pomeroy's, Maxwell's, Fowler's Department Store

Neiman Marcus

Macy's/Bloomingdales


The Men's Wearhouse ( George Zimmer)

Hart Schaffner & Marx

Florsheim Shoes

Steve & Barry's University Sportswear (Steve Shore & Barry Prevor)

Intel founded by Andrew Grove (Jewish) Source: Wikipedia

Oracle founded by Larry Ellison (Jewish) Source: Wikipedia

Dell Computer founded by Michael Dell (Jewish) Source: Wikipedia

Google Co-founded by Sergey Brin (Jewish) and Larry Page

United Online founded by Mark Goldston (Jewish) Source: Wikipedia. (Subsidiaries of this company include Netzero, Bluelight Internet Services, and Juno)

Carnival Cruise Lines (80% ownership by the Ted Arison family of Tel Aviv, Israel

U-Haul founded by Leonard Samuel Shoen, 1945, committed suicide 1999; family still controls around 40% of the corporation's publicly traded stock.

Chrysler LLC Owned by Cerberus Capital, which is headed by Steve Feinberg. (Cerberus owns/controls a multitude of other companies as well, included GMAC. Source: Wikipedia)

AIG (American International Group) Director: Marshall A. Cohen, (Jewish), member of Tri Lateral Commission. (source: Wikipedia) Cohen also sits on the International Advisory Committee of the Blackstone Group, a Jewish run private equity and investment firm. Blackstone was co-founded by Stephen A. Schwarzman,

Safe Auto Insurance Company (1-800-SAFE-AUTO) Privately held corporation. CEO is Ari Deshe; Vice Chairman and President is Jonathan Diamond.

H & R Block Income Tax Service

GMAC Owned by Cerberus Capital Management, which is headed by Steve Feinberg.

The New York Times controlled by the Arthur Sulzberger family

The Washington Post controlled by the Katherine Graham Mayer family

U.S. News and World Report CEO and major stockholder Mortimer Zuckerman

CanWest (Canada's second largest media conglomerate) Founded and run by the Jewish Asper family

Advance Publications (Samuel Newhouse) The company owns/controls the following newspapers: The Business Journal (Austin TX), Baltimore Business Journal (Baltimore, MD), Birmingham Business Journal (Birmingham, AL), Buffalo Business Journal (Buffalo, NY), Charlotte Business Journal (Charlotte, NC), Cincinnati Business Journal (Cincinnati, OH), Columbus Business Journal (Columbus, OH), Dallas Business Journal (Dallas, TX), Dayton Business Journal (Dayton, OH), Denver Business Journal (Denver, CO), Eastbay Business Journal (Oakland, CA), Triad Business Journal (Greensboro, NC), Pacific Business Journal (Honolulu, HI), Houston Business Journal (Houston, TX), Jacksonville Business Journal (Jacksonville, FL), Kansas City Business Journal (KC, MO), Business First of Louisville (Louisville, KY), Memphis Business Journal (Memphis, TN), Milwaukee Business Journal (Milwaukee, WI), Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal (Twin Cities), Nashville Business Journal (Nashville, TN), Orlando Business Journal (Orlando, FL), Philadelphia Business Journal (Philadelphia, PA), Phoenix Business Journal (Phoenix, AZ), Pittsburgh Business Journal (Pittsburg, PA), Portland Business Journal (Portland, OR), Triangle Business Journal (Raleigh, NC), Sacramento Business Journal (Sacramento, CA), St. Louis Business Journal (St. Louis, MO), San Antonio Business Journal (San Antonio, TX), San Francisco Business Journal (San Francisco, CA), San Jose Business Journal (San Jose, CA), Seattle Business Journal (Seattle, WA), South Florida Business Journal (Miami, FL), Tampa Bay Business Journal (Tampa, FL), Washington DC Business Journal (Washington DC), Wichita Business Journal (Wichita, KS), The Birmingham News (AL), The Patriot-News (Harrisburg, PA), The Express-Times (Easton, PA), The Allentown Times (PA), The Huntsville Times (AL), The Press-Register (Mobile, AL), The Jersey Journal (Jersey City, NJ), The Star-Ledger (Newark, NJ), Gloucester County Times (Woodbury, NJ), Today's Sunbeam (Salem, NJ), Bridgeton Evening News (NJ), The Times (Trenton, NJ), Mississippi Press (Pascagoula, MS), The Oregonian (Portland, OR), The Hillsboro Argus (OR), The Plain Dealer (Cleveland, OH), Staten Island Advance (New York City), Syracuse Post-Standard (NY), The New Orleans Times-Picayune (LA), The Springfield Republic (Springfield, MA), Sun Newspapers (Cleveland area), Ann Arbor News (MI), Bay City Times (MI), Flint Journal (MI), Grand Rapids Press (MI), Jackson Citizen-Patriot (MI), Kalamazoo Gazette (MI), Muskegon Chronicle (MI), Saginaw News (MI), Sports Business Journal, Sports Business Daily, NASCAR Scene, NASCAR Illustrated, Street & Smiths Sports Annuals, Hemmings Motor News, Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Sports & Exotic Cars, Hemmings Classic Car, The Sporting News, Allure, Architectural Digest, Bon Appetit, Brides, House & Garden, Conde Nast Traveler, Glamour, Gourmet, GQ, Jane, Lucky, The New Yorker, Parade, Self, Tatler, Vanity Fair, Vogue, Wired, The World of Interiors, W, Women's Wear Daily, Daily News Record, Footwear News, Home Furnishings News, Highpoints, Executive Technology, Children's Business, Supermarket News, Brand Marketing, Salon News, Details, Elegant Bride, Golf Digest, Golf for Women, Golf World, Golf World Business, Pivot Cellphone Service

Block Communications (Allen Block, Jewish) This company owns the following media assets, according to Hoover's Handbook: The Toledo Blade newspaper, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette newspaper, Buckeye Cablesystem (Toledo, OH), Buckeye Telesystem (Toledo, OH), Buckeye Express High Speed Internet (Toledo, OH), Buckeye-Access Dial-up Internet (Toledo, OH), Metro Fiber & Cable Construction Company (Toledo, OH), KTRV (Nampa-Boise ID, Fox TV Affiliate), WAND (Decatur, IL, NBC TV Affiliate), WDRB (Louisville, KY, Fox TV Affiliate), WMYO (Louisville, KY, My TV Affiliate), WLIO (Lima, OH, NBC Affiliate), WTO5 (Toledo, OH, CW Cable Channel)

Comcast (Brian L. Roberts, Jewish) Comcast is the largest provider of cable television in the United States; it is also the second largest provider of internet service in our country. Revenue: US$24.97 billion (2007) Roberts also sits on the corporate board of the Bank of New York. In addition to its massive cable and internet business, Comcast owns the following media properties: E! Entertainment Television, Style Network, The Golf Network, OLN, G4, AZN Television, PBS Kids Sprout, TV One

Capital Cities/ABC/Disney [Revenue: $30.8 billion] President and CEO is Robert Iger. This company controls the following media empire: Buena Vista Distribution, Walt Disney Pictures, Touchstone Pictures, Pixar Animation Studios, Walt Disney Animation Studios, Miramax Films, Disney Toon Studios, Hollywood Pictures, ABC Network, ABC News, ABC Family, ABC News Now, The Disney Channel, Jetix, Jetix Play, SOAPnet, Toon Disney, Lifetime Entertainment Services (50%), A & E Television Network (37.5%), ABC Studios, Disney-ABC Domestic Television, Disney-ABC International Television, Walt Disney Television Animation, Radio Disney, ESPN Networks, to include:, ESPN, ESPN 2, ESPN Classic, ESPN News, ESPN Deportes, ESPNU, ESPN on ABC, ESPN HD, ESPN 2 HD, ESPN Radio, ESPN Deportes Radio, ESPN The Magazine, ESPN Now, ESPN Plus, ESPN PPV, ESPN 360, NASN, Walt Disney Parks & Resorts, to include:, Disneyland Resort, Walt Disneyworld Resort, Tokyo Disney Resort, Disneyland Resort Paris, Hong Kong Disneyland Resort, Disney Cruise Line, Disney Regional Entertainment, Walt Disney Imagineering, ABC-owned Television Stations, to include: KABC, Los Angeles, KFSN, Fresno, KGO, San Francisco, KTRK, Houston, WABC, New York City (Live With Regis & Kelli), WJRT, Flint, Saginaw, Bay City (Michigan), WPVI, Philadelphia, WLC, Chicago, WTVG, Toledo, ABC-owned Radio Stations, to include:, KDIS, Pasadena, KDIZ, Minneapolis, St. Paul, KESN, Dallas/Fort Worth, KMIK, Tempe, AZ, KMKY, Oakland, CA, KNIT, Dallas/Fort Worth (Spanish language ESPN), KSPN, Los Angeles, WDDY, Albany, NY, WEAE, Pittsburgh
WEPN, New York City, WFDF, Farmington Hills (Detroit MI), WMKI, Boston, WMVP, Chicago, WQEW, New York City, WRDZ, Lagrange, IL, WRDZ FM, Indianapolis, IN, WSDZ, Belleville, IL, WWCS, Pittsburgh, WWMK, Cleveland, ABC News Radio, Disney Interactive Studios, Hyperion, Muppets Holding Company, Reedy Creek Energy Services, Walt Disney Theatrical

Viacom/CBS CEO/major stockholder: (Sumner Redstone, changed name from Murray Rothstein)

Brighthouse Networks Cable Television Company

The NFL Network Currently run by Stephen Bornstein, who was formerly head of ESPN and president of ABC

Miami Heat, 65% owned by the Ted Arison family of Tel Aviv, Israel

Washington Redskins, owned by Daniel Snyder (Jewish)

Indianapolis Colts, owned by Jim Irsay (Jewish)

New England Patriots, owned by Robert Kraft (Jewish)

Tampa Bay Buccaneers, owned by Malcolm Glazer (Jewish)

Denver Broncos, owned by Pat Bowlen (Jewish)

Philadelphia Eagles, owned by Jeffrey Lurie (Jewish)

Cleveland Browns, owned by Al Lerner (Jewish)

Minnesota Vikings, owned by Zygi Wilf (Jewish)

New York Giants, owned by the Mara & Tisch families (Jewish)

Atlanta Falcons, owned by Arthur Blank (Jewish)

Seattle Seahawks, owned by Paul Allen (Jewish)

Philadelphia Flyers, owned by Comcast (Brian L. Roberts, Jewish)

Philadelphia 76ers, owned by Comcast (Brian L. Roberts, Jewish)

Last edited by Steven L. Akins; December 9th, 2012 at 08:26 PM.
 
Old December 17th, 2012 #2
E.L. Lynch
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Damn, man. I didn't think that list would ever end. And I'm sure you could add many more.
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Old December 17th, 2012 #3
Steven L. Akins
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Quote:
Originally Posted by E.L. Lynch View Post
Damn, man. I didn't think that list would ever end. And I'm sure you could add many more.
It's far from complete since I didn't include the tangled history surrounding the Jewish takeover of Macy's and a large number of other American department stores:

Macy's was founded by Rowland Hussey Macy, who between 1843 and 1855 opened four retail dry goods stores, including the original Macy's store in downtown Haverhill, Massachusetts, established in 1851. They all failed, but he learned from his mistakes. Macy moved to New York City in 1858 and established a new store named "R. H. Macy & Co." Ownership of the company was passed down through the Macy family until 1895, when the company, now called "R. H. Macy & Co.", was acquired by Isidor Straus and his brother Nathan Straus. Straus and his brothers sold crockery to R.H. Macy & Company department store. The brothers became partners in Macy's in 1888 and co-owners in 1896.

In 1893, he and Isidor bought out Joseph Wechsler from the Abraham and Wechsler dry goods store in Brooklyn, New York, which they renamed Abraham & Straus.

Abraham & Straus (or A&S) was a major New York City department store, based in Brooklyn. Founded in 1865, in 1929, it became part of Federated Department Stores, which eliminated the A&S brand shortly after its 1994 acquisition of R.H. Macy & Company. Most A&S stores took the Macy's name, although a few became part of Stern's, another Federated division that offered lower-end goods than did Macy's or A&S.

Federated Department Stores was founded in 1929 in Columbus, Ohio. Federated was originally a department store holding company for Abraham & Straus, F&R Lazarus & Company (including its Cincinnati division, then known as Shillito's) and William Filene's Sons of Boston. Bloomingdale Brothers joined the organization in 1930. Federated moved its corporate offices to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1945.

Over the next few decades, Federated expanded nationwide, adding Rike Kumler of Dayton, Ohio (merged into Shillito's in the 1980s to become Shillito-Rike's); Burdines of Miami, Florida; Rich's of Atlanta, Georgia; Foley's of Houston, Texas; Sanger Brothers and A. Harris, both of Dallas, Texas (which was merged with Sanger Brothers to form Sanger-Harris); Boston Store of Milwaukee, Wisconsin; MainStreet of Chicago, Illinois; Bullock's, of Los Angeles; I. Magnin, of San Francisco, California; Gold Circle; and Richway Discount Department Stores of Worthington, Ohio. In 1982, Federated acquired the Twin Fair, Inc. discount store chain based in Buffalo, New York and merged it with Gold Circle.[5]

Federated was the successor to the Lazarus operation begun in Columbus, Ohio, in 1851. Lazarus family members served in prominent positions within Federated through the 1980s. In the mid-1930s, a modern merchandising standard was set when Fred Lazarus (son of Simon) arranged garments in groups of a single size with a range of style, color and price in that size, rather than the other way around. Lazarus based this technique upon observations made in Paris. Fred Lazarus Jr. also convinced President Franklin D. Roosevelt that changing the Thanksgiving holiday from the last Thursday of November to the fourth Thursday, extending the Christmas shopping season, would be good for the nation's business. An Act of Congress perpetuated the arrangement in 1941. After this date "Black Friday" became a nationwide sensation, becoming the most profitable day for Federated nationally. Other companies tried to follow suit but failed to achieve what John Albert Macy had in mind. Various Lazarus family members also held key positions on Federated's board and within its various divisions—namely, Foley's, Filene's, Lazarus and Shillito's. As of January, 2002, Robert Lazarus Jr. was the only family member still with an official role at Federated, serving as assistant to Ron Klein, then chairman and CEO of the Rich's/Lazarus/Goldsmith's operating unit of Federated, now Macy's South.

To support its huge retail operations, Federated centralized its back-office functions into several large divisions, covering financial services, marketing, merchandising, logistics, and data processing systems. Other retailers' branded credit cards are usually issued and serviced by a third-party bank; Federated was so huge that it ran its own private bank, FDS Bank, which for many years issued and maintained the majority of its own consumer credit card portfolio with a portion at one time owned by General Electric Credit Corporation, an arrangement inherited from when R.H. Macy & Company sold their credit portfolio in an attempt to prevent filing for bankruptcy. In 2005 Federated finalized an arrangement with CitiGroup to sell its consumer credit portfolio, reissuing its cards under the Federated-CitiGroup Alliance name Department Stores National Bank (DSNB) and allowing Federated to continue servicing the credit accounts from its Financial, Administrative and Credit Services Group (Macy's Credit and Customer Services)

In 1990, Federated—now under the control of Robert Campeau—went bankrupt after its hostile takeover of Allied Stores; it emerged from bankruptcy after the ouster of Campeau in 1992 as a new public company. Federated then took over Macy's in 1994 while that company was still emerging from its own bankruptcy in 1992. Federated entered e-commerce late, in 1998. FDS Bank was one of the last credit card banks to begin to allow its cardholders to access account information online (around 2004). The department store chain Stern's, a division of Federated, ceased operations in 2001 and most of its stores became Macy's stores. In 2003, Federated changed the nameplates of all their non-Macy's stores, except Bloomingdale's, to include the Macy's name. The rebranding process was referred internally to as Project Hyphen. Under the plan, Seattle-based The Bon Marche became Bon-Macy's; Goldsmith's in Tennessee became Goldsmith's-Macy's; Lazarus, Burdines, and Rich's also added "-Macy's" to their name. A year later, the original hyphenated names were dropped in favor of just Macy's, a rebranding process referred internally to as Project Star.

Federated settled an SEC investigation for $14.46 million in 1998 due to unethical debt-collection practices. Federated routinely forced credit card holders/debtors to sign an agreement that legally bound them to repay their outstanding balances instead of having the unsecured debt discharge via the filing of bankruptcy. Federated failed to file reaffirmation agreements with bankruptcy courts. As a result, the changes in the agreements were not legally binding.

On July 18, 2005, Federated Department Stores announced that they would acquire May Department Stores company for $11 billion in cash and stock. Also part of the buyout was the bridal and formal unit of May, consisting of David's Bridal and After Hours Formalwear. Federated would also assume $6 billion of May's debt, bringing total consideration to $17 billion. The deal would create the nation's largest department store chain with over 1,000 stores and $30 billion in annual sales. To help finance the deal, Federated agreed to sell its combined proprietary credit card business (but still administered by FACS Group, a subsidiary of Federated) to Citigroup. The merger was completed on August 30, 2005, after an assurance agreement was reached with the State Attorneys General of New York, California, Massachusetts, Maryland and Pennsylvania.

Federated announced plans to sell 80 store locations in 2006, having pledged in its settlement to sell most of them as viable businesses, with preference being given to a group of thirteen competitors. This number could fluctuate pursuant to Federated's negotiations with various mall landlords and its final decision regarding using former Macy locations for its luxury Bloomingdale's operation.

On January 12, 2006, Federated announced its plans to divest May Company's Lord & Taylor division (55 stores in 12 states) by the end of 2006 after concluding that chain did not fit with their strategic focus for building the Macy's and Bloomingdale's national brands. On June 22, 2006, Macy's announced that NRDC Equity Partners, LLC would purchase Lord & Taylor for US$1.2 billion, and completed the sale in October 2006.

On September 9, 2006, May Company division stores Famous-Barr, Filene's, Foley's (the prior two were former Federated stores in their own right), Hecht's, The Jones Store, L. S. Ayres, Marshall Field's, Meier & Frank, Robinsons-May, and Strawbridge's brands ceased to exist as Federated replaced most of them with the Macy's masthead, and a select few converting to the Bloomingdale's brand. The conversion of Marshall Field's in Chicago has been particularly criticized, with many customers boycotting the State Street store and staying away from the emporium. The Chicago Tribune continues to report on the poor reception of Macy's in Chicago. Kaufmann's in Pittsburgh also had a dislike to the change most due to the concern of the local parade run by the store. Other stores like Famous-Barr in St. Louis also disliked the change, but not nearly as much as Marshall Field's.[citation needed]

One of the consequences of this rebranding is that over 80 U.S. malls now have two Macy's department stores. In Downtown Boston, Federated liquidated an acquired Filene's because it already had a Macy's (formerly a Jordan Marsh) across the street. The two stores have a combined floorspace of more than 1,400,000 square feet (130,000 m2), more than two-thirds the size of Macy's New York City flagship store.

On November 17, 2006, the bridal and formal unit was sold. David's Bridal and Priscilla of Boston were sold to Leonard Green & Partners. After Hours Formalwear was sold to Men's Wearhouse.

On February 27, 2007, Federated announced that its board of directors would ask shareholders to change the company's name to Macy's Group, Inc. By March 28, the company revised its plans for the new name, opting to eventually become Macy's, Inc. Federated shareholders approved the revised proposal during the company's annual meeting on May 18, 2007.The company was previously known as Federated Retail Holdings, Inc.
 
Old January 11th, 2013 #4
Shayanna
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jewsign another addition

You can also add Care Apparel to this list. They make medical supplies such as cushions for wheelchairs, etc. There is a small factory in Pulaski,TN where they sew these items. My husband worked there for a few weeks until one of the seamstresses started giving him a hard time. (They have men there to move the bins of finished items). He went to the supervisor about it and she basically told him that's just how she is.... We looked into the chain of command to solve the problem and the next person up is the owner and his wife. David Welner and Rebecca Welner in Oceanside,NY. Looks like they have a silent partner as well,Max Frenkel in FL.. They supply many companies. Below is a link to the make up of this company, but if you search David Welner or CareApparel.com you will find more to this list


http://www.corporationwiki.com/New-Y...c-4486584.aspx
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