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Old 1 Week Ago #1
Nikola Bijeliti
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Default The Boomer World View

Intergenerational conflict is bad for our race, yet there is a lot of conflict between the generations due to lack of understanding. So let me present what I believe to be the Boomer World View.

The first thing you have to understand is that the life experience of early Boomers was quite different from that of late Boomers. Those born before 1955 were subject to being drafted to fight in Vietnam, whereas those born later were not. That definitely had an an impact on out respective world views. Also, the late Boomers were subject to a good deal of anti-Racist indoctrination in the schools, whereas the early Boomers got less such indoctrination, if they got any at all. So there is definitely a rift between the early and late Boomers. The early Boomers' world view is closer to the Flippers', whereas the late Boomers world view is closer to that of Generation X. What follows mainly describes the world view of the late Boomers, as that is what I understand better. It is also intended to describe the world view of the typical Boomer, not one who was especially racially aware.

I am a late Boomer who grew up in the Northeast, went to a public elementary school that was all-White and, as far as I know, all Catholic. Everyone in elementary school knew what ethnic group he belonged to, and ethnic jokes were common. The junior high school and high school that I went to were nearly all-White. With the exception of gym class, all my classes were all-White, except for one Armenian girl whom everyone thought of as White. There was only one Black in my gym class. There were some Puerto Ricans at the school, but I don't recall knowing any of them, and there was one girl from India.

The Boomer Attitude Toward Race

The first thing to understand about the Boomer World View is that

Boomers were explicitly race-neutral but implicitly pro-White.

One could, of course, claim that to be race-neutral is to be anti-White, and I won't dispute that. But Boomers didn't go around cursing their ancestors; that became a characteristic of later generations. Most Boomers did not believe the races to be equal, but believed that it was wrong to discriminate based on racial stereotypes. We believed that because we were taught that from an early age. The Flippers believed the same thing as adults, but they felt uncomfortable around Blacks because they had not been brought up to treat them as equals. Boomers generally felt more comfortable around Blacks because we were taught to treat them equally from an early age.

One day in my all-White elementary school, Black children were brought in for one day and we were told to play with them. We all found them very strange. We treated them decently, but after they left, everyone made fun of them. Some of the boys called them "Niggers." I corrected them and told them that the correct word was "Negroes." I did this, not because I liked them, but more out of being a "Grammar Nazi" and insisting on correct terminology, grammar, and spelling. I was "offended" in the same way I was offended by hearing the word "ain't"; it was simply an incorrect word.

Once, in high school, we were going to have a debate and had to choose a topic for the debate. It had to be something in the news. Someone suggested forced school busing to achieve racial integration, but no one would argue in favor of it, so we had to choose a different topic. We settled on the legalization of sports gambling.

When I got my first job and moved into a large city, it became obvious to me that Blacks were not like us at all. I recall someone once advising me to stay away from a particular neighborhood, telling me, "I'm not racist, but they are." This was a typical Boomer attitude, wanting to treat all people equally but realizing that, in the real world, that was often not possible. This is implicitly pro-White but could not be made explicit because most Boomers could not break through their upbringing that "racism" was wrong.

On numerous occasions I have heard Boomers make jokes at the expense of Blacks and other races, or told them myself. Never once have I heard a Boomer get offended by such jokes. We all knew how Blacks and other races were. I have never met a White Boomer who thought affirmative action was a good thing. In fact, I can't recall meeting a White person of any generation who thought it was good.

It is true that Boomers watched Black athletes and entertainers. But, professional sports being racially integrated, the only way not to watch Black athletes was to watch no professional sports at all, which, come to think of it, would have been better. As far as entertainment goes, Boomers were not the first to watch Black entertainers. Louis Armstrong, Nat King Cole, Duke Ellington, and Dizzie Gillespie were all popular among White Flippers.

The Boomer Attitude Toward the Confederate Flag

Boomers did not take offense at the Confederate flag. The Dukes of Hazard was a popular television program among Boomers and featured a car with a Confederate flag painted on top. When Bill Clinton ran for president, his campaign buttons featured a Confederate flag, and this did not stop any Boomers from voting for him.

The Boomer Attitude Toward Germany and Germans

The thing to keep in mind here is that the Boomer attitude was shaped by the Cold War, not World War II. Thus, the Boomer attitude was that

West Germany was our friend, but East Germany was our enemy.

Whereas, to a Flipper, a communist could sometimes be your friend, to a Boomer, Communists were always evil. The people living under communism were suffering under its oppression. Thus, the Boomer attitude was that

Germans were innocent victims of communism.

Both presidents Kennedy and Reagan were heroes to the Boomer generation. Kennedy went to Berlin and, to show solidarity, told the people, "Ich bin ein Berliner." That is a very pro-German statement, and, as Germans are White, an implicitly pro-White statement. Reagan, referring to the Berlin Wall, said, "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down that wall!" That is also a very pro-German and, implicitly, pro-White statement. We read stories of East Germans risking their lives to escape to West Germany and were happy whenever we learned that one had managed to escape. Boomers celebrated when the Berlin Wall came down, and all Germans could unite and live in freedom. That is, likewise, a very pro-German and, implicitly, pro-White attitude.

President Reagan is often criticized for giving amnesty to illegal Mexicans, but almost nobody today knows the reasoning behind it. We were still in the Cold War, and Reagan believed that deporting large numbers of Mexicans would destabilize Mexico and could cause it to turn communist. Although, in retrospect, that was a very bad move, in the context of the Cold War there was a certain rational behind it.

Of course, neither Kennedy nor Reagan were Boomers, but I wanted to explain the Boomers' admiration for them.

The Boomer Attitude Toward Adolf Hitler

To Boomers, World War II was a historical event and not something of burning importance. If you asked a Boomer why Hitler was bad, he would probably answer that Hitler was bad because he was a dictator and was depriving people of their freedom. I don't think that any would say he was bad because he was racist. That is because

To Boomers, the fundamental divide was freedom versus dictatorship, not White versus non-White.

Boomers believed in freedom because we were taught that was the American way. When I first read Mein Kampf, I was quite surprised at the contents. I was expecting a political treatise explaining why dictatorship was better than freedom. I was quite surprised to find what was largely a racial treatise.

The Boomers Attitude Toward Nuclear Weapons

During the time that the Boomers were growing up, the threat of nuclear war destroying all life on earth was always in the background. That led some Boomers to declare that it was wrong for the United States to drop atomic bombs on Japan in World War II, because it "let the genie out of the bottle," so to speak. If the United States had never developed nuclear weapons, their reasoning went, neither would the Soviet Union have done so. Although perhaps flawed reasoning, it had nothing to do with race. I have never heard a Boomer condemn the Allied firebombing of Tokyo, even thought it killed 100,000 Japanese civilians.

The Boomer Attitude Toward Later Generations

The Boomers lived through an era of economic prosperity in which it was relatively easy to be successful in a career. Thus many Boomers look down on later generations who are having a much harder time doing so. This is quite unfortunate, because the experiences of later generations are quite unlike those of the Boomers, just as the experiences of the Boomers are quite unlike those of previous generations.

Many of the early Boomers were able to pursue a successful career with one employer throughout their entire lives and retire in good financial condition. Some of the late Boomers were not so fortunate, and many with successful careers found themselves unemployed in their forties or fifties and had difficulty finding work. Thus late Boomers have an easier time relating to later generations than early Boomers.

The Duty of Boomers Today

The younger generations, including the Millennial generation and the Zyklon generation, deserve out complete and total support. We cannot let generational rifts get in the way of White unity. Boomers must understand the the experiences of the younger generations are not like our own, just as our experiences were not like those of previous generations.
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Flipper Generation: We killed the evil Nazis.
Boomer Generation: We refuse to fight Jew wars.
Millennial Generation: It's the Boomers' fault!
Zyklon Generation: WE take responsibility.
 
Old 1 Week Ago #2
Ray Allan
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Excellent post, Nikola. As a late Boomer myself, I can relate. I feel like I was born at a very weird and awkward moment. The older Boomers are more like the WWjew generation to me in their thinking and actions, but the people born after me I can't fully relate to either, although I probably am closer to Generation X in my age, views and outlook. These generational rifts no doubt are created by a combination of jewish meddling and their control of information and popular entertainment and rapidly changing technology and social engineering which is leaving many Whites clueless, dumbfounded and unable to cope. And this sort of thing has never happened before in history until relatively recently. I do hope more younger White people can get a grasp on what's truly going on and who is behind it and eliminate it once and for all, or else we really do have no future.
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Old 1 Week Ago #3
Nikola Bijeliti
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Here is an interesting article I found in my Inbox:

Move Over "Friends," Millennials now find "Seinfeld" Problematic

Quote:
So much of our culture today seems to be about finding reasons to hate pop culture from even a decade or two ago.

Now, one of the most popular and successful TV shows of all time is considered problematic for several jokes that were okay – or a little edgy – in the 1990s that are now offensive to American millennials. The previous victim of this new, politically correct world was “Friends.” Now, “Seinfeld” is getting the social justice warrior treatment.
Let me state that I have never watched either Friends of Seinfeld. In fact, I've watched very little television at all since I was a teenager, and the last television program I watched was the Winter Olympics eleven months ago.

But what this article makes clear is that the Boomer generation was definitely not P.C. Boomers told some pretty raunchy, off-color jokes. Comedians used to perform on college campuses, but no more, because the younger generation refuses to laugh.
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Flipper Generation: We killed the evil Nazis.
Boomer Generation: We refuse to fight Jew wars.
Millennial Generation: It's the Boomers' fault!
Zyklon Generation: WE take responsibility.
 
Old 1 Week Ago #4
Alex Linder
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nice article, nb!

yeah, they're now going thru and retrotutting not only real history and white achievements but even their own fucking PC shit that was semitically correct in the first place

Last edited by Alex Linder; 1 Week Ago at 02:23 PM.
 
Old 1 Week Ago #5
Crowe
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Difference between early millennials, (those who actually remember the 1980s) and those born in the mid 90s to 2k are pretty huge as well.

I wasn't exposed to pro-fag propaganda growing up. That really kicked into high gear during 2004-2006. Later millennials would have been in grade school. And it's gotten consistently worse since. We still used "fag" as an insult during the 90s, and there were no PC police to tell us that was wrong. People who's peers thought were gay, were in fact picked on and ridiculed for it.

Most early millennials parents were Boomers, whereas later millennials mostly had Gen X parents.
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Old 1 Week Ago #6
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Pretty good take.

Here is my perspective as a millennial

http://volkish.org/2018/08/21/a-corr...-cycle-theory/
 
Old 1 Week Ago #7
Nikola Bijeliti
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Here is a very pro-White song that was very popular among Boomers and that all Boomers know. The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down was recorded by many performers, including The Band, Joan Baez, and even Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead. Here is a version by Johnny Cash:


Virgil Kane is the name
And I served on the Danville train
'Till Stoneman's cavalry came
And tore up the tracks again
In the winter of '65
We were hungry, just barely alive
By May the 10th, Richmond had fell
It's a time I remember, oh so well

The night they drove old Dixie down
And the bells were ringing
The night they drove old Dixie down
And the people were singing
They went, "Na, na, la, na, na, la"

Back with my wife in Tennessee
When one day she called to me
"Virgil, quick, come see,
There goes Robert E. Lee!"
Now, I don't mind chopping wood
And I don't care if the money's no good
You take what you need
And you leave the rest
But they should never
Have taken the very best

The night they drove old Dixie down
And the bells were ringing
The night they drove old Dixie down
And all the people were singing
They went, "Na, na, la, na, na, la"

Like my father before me
I will work the land
And like my brother above me
Who took a rebel stand
He was just 18, proud and brave
But a Yankee laid him in his grave
I swear by the mud below my feet
You can't raise a Kane back up
When he's in defeat

The night they drove old Dixie down
And the bells were ringing
The night they drove old Dixie down
And all the people were singing
They went, "Na, na, la, na, na, la"
The night they drove old Dixie down
And all the bells were ringing
The night they drove old Dixie down
And the people were singing
They went, "Na, na, la, na, na, la"

The song came out in the year 1969, the same year as the Woodstock Music Festival that is notoriously associated with the Boomer generation, even though only about a quarter of all Boomers were eighteen years old or older at the time of the festival. The song was released in September of that year, one month after the festival, so it could not have been included in the festival program, but the first two artists to record the song, The Band and Joan Baez, did perform at Woodstock, and the song would probably have been included had it been released a couple of months earlier. Joan Baez's version reached number three on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the US in October of 1971 and was number one for five weeks on the Easy Listening chart. The song continued to be performed and heard on the radio for decades and was definitely a mainstream song among the Boomers, not just a fringe group. Although most of the artists who performed the song were members of the Silent Generation, John Kahn, who played bass in the Jerry Garcia version, was a Boomer.

I challenge anybody to name a song of a similar nature that has the same degree of popularity among the Millennial Generation that is considered mainstream and does not appeal only to fringe elements.
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Flipper Generation: We killed the evil Nazis.
Boomer Generation: We refuse to fight Jew wars.
Millennial Generation: It's the Boomers' fault!
Zyklon Generation: WE take responsibility.
 
Old 1 Week Ago #8
Gladiatrix
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Nikola, which Boomer year were you born in? I am from first year of Gen X, 1965.

I have been snapped at on jew tube from people make videos blaming Boomers for the Hart Cellar Immigration Act of 1965. I pointed out to them that the oldest Boomers were 19 that year and could not vote, as the voting age was 21 until the early 70s.
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Old 1 Week Ago #9
Nikola Bijeliti
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gladiatrix View Post
Nikola, which Boomer year were you born in? I am from first year of Gen X, 1965.

I have been snapped at on jew tube from people make videos blaming Boomers for the Hart Cellar Immigration Act of 1965. I pointed out to them that the oldest Boomers were 19 that year and could not vote, as the voting age was 21 until the early 70s.
I'm not going to give the exact year, but I was born during the second half of the boomer period, after 1955. And, yes, everything that happened during the 1960's gets blamed on the Boomers, even though the Boomers were children and/or adolescents during most or all of that decade. Only Boomers born in 1948 or earlier attained their majority during that decade, which is about one Boomer out of six.
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Flipper Generation: We killed the evil Nazis.
Boomer Generation: We refuse to fight Jew wars.
Millennial Generation: It's the Boomers' fault!
Zyklon Generation: WE take responsibility.
 
Old 6 Days Ago #10
Nikola Bijeliti
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Although the Late Boomers did not fight in Vietnam, some inlisted in the military and were stationed in Germany, but, unlike the Flippers, their role was to defend Germany and Europe from the communists. Thus Boomers thought of Germans and Europeans as worthy people who must be protected against the communists.

The West Germans admired American culture, and many songs popular in the United States were translated into German and became popular there, too. One example was the song "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" from the last post. Since the War Between the States was not relevant to Germans, the context had to be changed to something else. The obvious choice would be the fall of Berlin, but that would not have been permitted, so the German lyrics are about drug addiction. Although that may seem quite removed from the original lyrics, war and drug addiction are both tools that the Jews use to destroy White people, so the lyrics are still relevant.

Am Tag als Conny Kramer starb


Wir lagen träumend im Gras
Die Köpfe voll verrückter Ideen
Da sagte er nur zum Spaß:
"Komm, lass uns auf die Reise gehen"
Doch der Rauch schmeckte bitter
Aber Conny sagte mir, was er sah
Ein Meer von Licht und Farben
Wir ahnten nicht
Was bald darauf geschah

Am Tag, als Conny Kramer starb
Und alle Glocken klangen
Am Tag, als Conny Kramer starb
Und alle Freunde weinten um ihn
Das war ein schwerer Tag
Weil in mir eine Welt zerbrach

Er versprach oft: "Ich lass es sein"
Das gab mir wieder neuen Mut
Und ich redete mir ein
Mit Liebe wird alles gut
Doch aus den Joints, da wurden Trips
Es gab keinen Halt auf der schiefen Bahn
Die Leute fingen an zu reden
Aber keiner bot Conny Hilfe an

Am Tag, als Conny Kramer starb
Und alle Glocken klangen
Am Tag, als Conny Kramer starb
Und alle Freunde weinten um ihn
Das war ein schwerer Tag
Weil in mir eine Welt zerbrach

Beim letzten Mal sagte er
"Nun kann ich den Himmel sehen"
Ich schrie ihn an: "Oh komm zurück!"
Er konnte es nicht mehr verstehen
Ich hatte nicht einmal mehr Tränen
Ich hatte alles verloren, was ich hab
Das Leben geht einfach weiter
Mir bleiben nur noch die Blumen auf seinem Grab

Am Tag, als Conny Kramer starb
Und alle Glocken klangen
Am Tag, als Conny Kramer starb
Und alle Freunde weinten um ihn
Das war ein schwerer Tag
Weil in mir eine Welt zerbrach

Here is an English translation produced by Google Translate:

We lay in the grass dreaming
The heads full of crazy ideas
He just said for fun:
"Come on, let's go on the journey"
But the smoke tasted bitter
But Conny told me what he saw
A sea of ​​light and colors
We did not know
What happened soon afterwards

The day Conny Kramer died
And all the bells sounded
The day Conny Kramer died
And all the friends wept for him
That was a tough day
Because a world broke in me

He often promised, "I'll let it be."
That gave me new courage
And I talked to myself
Everything will be fine with love
But from the joints, there were trips
There was no stopping on the wrong path
People started talking
But none offered Conny help

The day Conny Kramer died
And all the bells sounded
The day Conny Kramer died
And all the friends wept for him
That was a tough day
Because a world broke in me

Last time he said
"Now I can see the sky"
I yelled at him, "Oh come back!"
He could not understand it anymore
I did not even cry anymore
I lost everything I have
Life just goes on
Only the flowers remain on his grave

The day Conny Kramer died
And all the bells sounded
The day Conny Kramer died
And all the friends wept for him
That was a tough day
Because a world broke in me

If you don't know German, you can listen to the song in German and imagine that she is singing about the fall of Berlin.
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Flipper Generation: We killed the evil Nazis.
Boomer Generation: We refuse to fight Jew wars.
Millennial Generation: It's the Boomers' fault!
Zyklon Generation: WE take responsibility.
 
Old 4 Days Ago #11
Nikola Bijeliti
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The sixties is the decade that is indelibly linked to the Boomer generation, and one of the things that charactarizes the sixties is its music. Every Boomer remembers the music of the sixties, and for most of us it holds a special place in our hearts.

I am a classical music lover. I listen to classical music almost exclusively, seldom listen to anything else, and don't hold a very high regard for popular music. But, not too long ago, I decided to change the station on my car radio from a classical station to a station that only plays sixites music, and I listened to that for a few days before going back to listening to classical music. This is one of the songs that I encountered.


Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhh...
La la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la
La la la la la la la la la la la la la la la ...

Good mornin' starshine, the earth says hello
You twinkle above us
We twinkle below

Good mornin' starshine, You lead us along
My love and me as we sing
our early mornin' singin' song

Glibby gloop gloopy Nibby Nabby Noopy La La La Lo Lo
Sabba Sibby Sabba Nooby abba Nabba Le Le Lo Lo
Tooby ooby walla nooby abba nabba
Early mornin' singin' song

Good mornin' starshine
There's love in your skies
reflecting the sunlight
in my lovers eyes

Good mornin' starshine, so happy to be
my love and me as we sing
our early mornin' singin' song

Glibby gloop gloopy Nibby Nabby Noopy La La La Lo Lo
Sabba sibby sabba nooby abba nabba Le Le Lo Lo
Tooby ooby walla Nooby abba nabba
Early mornin' singin' song

***musical interlude***

Can you hear me?
Singin' a song, hummin' a song, singin' a song
Lovin' a song, laughin' a song, singin' the song
Sing the song, song the sing

song song song sing, sing sing sing song
Long long long ling, ling ling ling long

Sing sing a song sing a song
yah, you can sing sing song sing a song
Sing sing a song, sing a song

Sing...

It is a song I remember well from my childhood, and I was delighted to hear it again.

Now let us compare that song with a song that popular among the Millenial generation. (The actual song starts at two minutes into the video.)


Once upon a time, a few mistakes ago
I was in your sights, you got me alone
You found me

I guess you didn't care & I guess I liked that
And when I fell hard, you took a step back
Without me

And he's long gone when he's next to me
And I realize the blame is on me

'Cause I knew you were trouble when you walked in
So shame on me now
Flew me to places I'd never been
So you put me down
I knew you were trouble when you walked in
So shame on me now
Flew me to places I'd never been
Now I'm lying on the cold hard ground

Oh...
Trouble...

Oh...
Trouble...

No apologies, he'll never see you cry
Pretends he doesn't know that he's the reason why
You're drowning

And I heard you moved on from whispers on the street
A new notch in your belt is all I'll ever be
Now I see

He was long gone when he met me
And I realize the joke is on me

I knew you were trouble when you walked in
So shame on me now
Flew me to places I'd never been
So you put me down
I knew you were trouble when you walked in
So shame on me now
Flew me to places I'd never been
Now I'm lying on the cold hard ground

Oh...
Trouble...

Oh...
Trouble...

When your saddest fear comes creeping in
That you never loved me or her or anyone or anything

I knew you were trouble when you walked in
So shame on me now
Flew me to places I'd never been
So you put me down oh
I knew you were trouble when you walked in
So shame on me now
Flew me to places I'd never been
Now I'm lying on the cold hard ground

Oh...
Trouble...

Oh...
Trouble...

I knew you were trouble when you walked in
Trouble

I knew you were trouble when you walked in
Trouble

Like "Good Morning, Starshine," "I Knew You Were Trouble" is pleasant to listen to. I'm not sure that it is representative, but, as Taylor Swift is considered an "Aryan Godess," it will do for the comparison.

I used to know a composer and attended some of his lectures. In one of his lectures, he explained the difference between Western Music and Eastern, particluarly Chinese, music. The principal difference, according to him, is that, in Western music, the melody is the most important, whereas, in Chinese music, it is the timbre. You could take any Western song and transpose it to another instrument, and it would still be perceived as the same song. For example, Mozart's "La ci darem la mano" is perceived by us as the same song as Chopin's variations on the same, even though Mozart's work is an operatic duet, whereas Chopin's is a piano sonata. You could not do the same with authentic Chinese music. You could, however, change the melody while keeping the same timbres, and it would be perceived as the same song.

Let us now consider the two aforementioned songs, considering, for the moment, only their aesthetic aspects while ignoring the lyrics and the deeper meanings of each.

My test of as good song is whether you can hum it or play it as an instrumental and have it still sound good. "Good Morning, Starshine" can be played on any instrument and be sung by any singer, male or female, or played as an instrumental work, and still sound just as beautiful. That cannot be said of "I Knew You Were Trouble." You cannot hum it or play it on a guitar or a piano and have it sound like anything. A male singer cannot sing it and have it sound like anything other than a parody. Even a female singer would have to immitate the voice and singing style of Taylor Swift to have it sound good. That is because a lot of popular music today is not about the melody but about the sound. In the case of female musicians, of which there are a lot more today than in the past, it us usually about hearing a sexy voice rather than appreciating the aesthetic qualities of the melody.

Now let us get into the lyrics and the deeper meaning of the two songs. First let me say that

No generation is responsible for the songs that they listened to in their youth.

That is because the (((music industry))) decides which songs are to be played. The reason, I believe, that "The Day They Drove Old Dixie Down" was permitted was that it could be thought of as an anti-war song, and anti-war songs were being promoted at that time. Jews are masters at playing both sides of a conflict. First, they drum up patriotic ferver to get young White men killed in war, then they promote anti-War sentiment to destroy patriotism, then, when that's run its course, they go back to promoting war to get more young White men killed.

I liked listening to "Good Morning, Starshine" so much that I decided to look more into that song. The lyrics are so innocent, it could almost be a children's song. Only the parts about "my love and me" and "in my lover's eyes" make it seem out of place as a children's song. What I found was that the song was taken from the Broadway musical "Hair." I like Broadway musicals, and I do remember from my childhood that there was a musical called "Hair," although I had never seen it, so I decided to look further into it. Here is that same song from the movie "Hair," taken in its context within the story.


If you couldn't make it though the entire clip, I don't blame you. Neither could I. The whole musical promotes sexual promiscuity and miscegenation. Also notice how ridiculous the roles are in the above clip. The woman is doing the driving, while her Negro lover just sits there smiling like an ornament. We were exposed to this propaganda from an early age. This is being done to us in a systematic manner, with the propaganda that each successive generation is exposed to building on what was promoted before.

Now let's compare that to "I Knew You Were Trouble." The latter is a song about a relationship gone wrong. Although, as I have said, I don't pay much attention to popular music, every popular song by a White woman today seems to be about ending a relationship with a man. This is clearly propaganda aimed at preventing White people from forming stable relationships.

Here are a couple more propaganda songs that we listened to.


It was pretty obvious what that song was about, but it fit in with what we were being taught in school, so I didn't think much of it at the time. Here is another.


I didn't know what the word "ebony" meant when I was a kid, and I didn't pay close attention to the lyrics, so the first word sounded like a name, "Evelyn" or something. It was a relatively pleasant song, and it was only when I was older that I realized what it was about.

My point here is that, despite what we may think, we don't choose the songs we like to listen to in our youth; they are chosen for us. Thus it makes no sense to judge any generation by the music they listened to. The sixties music has a special sound to me, both powerful and melodic, that is not found in the music of earlier or later decades. Flippers all love Frank Sinatra, but I just can't imagine anyone wanting to listen to "Glow little glow-worm, glimmer, glimmer."

The truth is that, within certain limits, people grow up liking the songs that were presented to them in their youth. I say "within certain limits" because I draw the line at rap. I think that a White person would have to be seriously depraved to enjoy rap, regardless of how much of it he was exposed to. But, excluding rap, it is normal to expect people to grow up to liking to listen to the music they were exposed to, and they should not be judged on that basis. We are less free than we think.
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Flipper Generation: We killed the evil Nazis.
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Old 4 Days Ago #12
Ray Allan
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Ray Allan
Default I'm more stuck in the 70s than the 60s

Yeah, they had a Negro drummer, but the Average White Band had a great name.

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Old 4 Days Ago #13
Alex Linder
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been out driving this week. if you cross the country, outside urban areas, where you get zambezi flow, you get christian stuff, pop music and npr.

pop music and christianity are like good cop bad cop. one is all about drinking, sex, endless emotional stuff...then when all that fails you, jesus is muh salvation. NPR is one cult's view of the world: the upper-middle class anglo-judeo type: it literally offers one perspective only and does not acknowledge the existence of validity of other views.
 
Old 4 Days Ago #14
Crowe
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Christianity acts as a retardant for cognitive dissonance. The White Christian might momentarily question something, just to later prostrate themselves before a jew on a stick for forgiveness for the "bad think".
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